Can NuCalm Help With PTSD?

Retired Navy SEAL Bob Reitz joins This Is NuCalm to share how his deployments have shaped civilian life. He elaborates on the coping mechanisms he’s developed in conjunction with NuCalm, to manage his PTSD and hypervigilance.

 

“You may be able to hold your breath for five minutes, but they want to know how you manage and how you act at five minutes and one second. Do you panic? Do you compete? Do you keep your composure? Do you stay underwater and relax even though you’re a quiet storm inside? All those things matter.”

— Bob Reitz

 

Bob Reitz is open and honest in this conversation with David Poole about what it entails to be a SEAL. He shares some of the grueling trials and training required.

 

“Everything about SEAL training is failure.”

— Bob Reitz

 

Tune into this bittersweet and motivational discussion with former Navy SEAL, Bob Reitz on This Is NuCalm! 

 

More About Bob Reitz, Retired U.S. Navy SEAL

Bob Reitz, retired U.S. Navy SEAL, spent 23 years in the Navy, with the last 16 years as an officer in the SEAL Teams.

Science Has NuCalm’s Back with Dr. Hu

Today’s guest, Dr. Xiaoyan Hu is leading the research on the use of NuCalm with various populations in China. From the benefits of NuCalm in the elderly, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s as well as children with Autism or ADHD.

Tune in for a fascinating discussion on the results she has been seeing as well as how her NuCalm business is growing.

 

“I don’t know how you manage that in the U.S., but here, if you see a teenager is very anxious, the parents will say ‘No! he is fine, it’s normal to have stress.’ So that will be an argument and we’ll say OK, let’s help your child to get better grades, to get to a better school, a better college. And that’s exactly what they need.” — Xiaoyan Dr. Hu

 

Listen to This Is NuCalm on Apple & Spotify!

 

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu graduated from the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, majoring in Biochemistry and Molecular Neurobiology. During her PhD, Dr. Hu took neuroscience as her lifelong research direction. To provide better service for the community, Dr. Hu studied social services, and studied nutrition, natural medicine, sociology, psychology, and neuro-linguistic programming. Due to this special experience, Dr. Hu made many friends in natural medicine and other fields which laid the groundwork for her later work in China.



 

Key Takeaways

 

[1:00] David welcomes Dr. Hu and invites her to share her life story and what brought her to dedicate her life to others in such a powerful way, from a childhood head injury that left her unable to walk to a Ph.D. and becoming an instructor at Cornell Medical College.

 

[8:38] Dr. Hu shares the work she has been doing in order to help the people ever since moving back to China, from non-profits to launching businesses to investing in education and since this year, NuCalm!

 

[12:04] How often does Dr. Hu use NuCalm? She shares all of the technologies and practices she surveyed before finding NuCalm and what it offered that all the others didn’t.

 

[17:39] David shares some striking practices he saw when he visited China, the large groups of elderly people training together! He asks Dr. Hu what young people do for optimal health.

 

[18:40] Dr. Hu shares an overview of the vast research projects she has been undertaking with NuCalm around Alzheimers and Parkinsons, as well as the especially interesting results she has been seeing with children with Autism and ADHD.

 

[26:15] Dr. Hu is building an entire stress management and depression management system around NuCalm since there is no similar offering in China currently. She shares a bit about the situation with teenage anxiety and depression and how her team is tackling the issues.

 

[31:32] Going the medical route — large hospital support, government support — is how Dr. Hu is gaining trust from the market and growing her business; she touches on what she sees in the future.

 

[35:34] Pharmacology isn’t the problem in China — like in the U.S. — it’s diagnosis! Dr. Hu shares her thoughts on traditional Chinese medicine.

 

[40:10] Dr. Hu shares her favorite things to do both in the U.S. and in China! She also talks about her 16,000 students, where they come from, and how they came to find her.

 

[45:16] What is Dr. Hu’s role with NuCalm?

 

[48:22] Tips for people who are resistant to fully relaxing?

 

[51:10] What about people with pacemakers?

 

[52:28] How much does Dr. Hu sleep now that she uses NuCalm?

 

[53:00] How does the cultural difference between East and West impact the adoption of NuCalm?

 

[55:28] Can NuCalm help with moderate OCD?

 

[55:46] What about volume while doing NuCalm?

 

[57:22] Favorite NuCalm track?

 

[57:37] Why is pericardium 6 the chosen point?

 

[59:15] When using Airpods, do I need to use both pods?

 

[1:01:20] Can you use bone conduction headphones instead of NuCalm?

 

[1:01:40] What growth is expected for China?

 

[1:05:12] What were Dr. Hu’s most challenging cases?

 

[1:07:56] What is your experience working with seniors 75 years old and older?

 

[1:10:15] David thanks Dr. Hu for sharing her international knowledge and expertise and signs off until next time.

 

This is NuCalm, the show for those looking to improve sleep quality, manage stress, and boost recovery. Brought to you by Solace Lifesciences, the makers of NuCalm, the world’s only patented and proven neuroscience technology that works within minutes, without drugs, every time! In over one million medical sessions, NuCalm has helped men and women around the world.

 

NuCalm: stress relief for the way we live today, technology to help you disconnect.


Full Transcript 

 

David Poole
Tonight it is a great pleasure of mine to introduce our mastermind participants to Dr. Hu. We became acquainted with Dr. Hu, honestly it was about this time last year. It was about a year ago. We went to Beijing the invitation of Dr. Hu, a generous invitation last year, to participate in one of her annual scientific platforms or discussions with worldwide experts. We learned a lot. It was a really amazing group of people. It was really generous of her to invite us, but also really beneficial for us to be there. And then we got to spend some quality time with Dr. Hu and her team. And from there the birth of a partnership. We’ve never had a partner internationally in 18 years of the company. We’ve never had a licensing agreement with anybody.

David Poole
There’s a lot of things we’ve done with Dr. Hu for the first time, because we trust her. But more importantly in Dr. Hu we see a reflection of ourselves. When we hear her story tonight is, there’s very few people that are dedicated and have a sense of purpose and determination in the world than someone like Dr. Hu. And a lot of the people we’ve talked to on these calls, Dan Selene, a few weeks ago, they have that sense of purpose. And a lot of it’s driven around their own internal inspiration. Dr. Hu is about serving other people. And once we understood that, realize that, saw the impact she was having on the population there, on the other scientists who would give up a week of their life to be there and participate.

David Poole
It was a very incredible experience for us. And it’s been a real blessing. And she’s responsible for bringing our tech and the spirit of NuCalm to a big population in China. So tonight with that I’d like to start with, thank you, Dr. Hu for joining us. I know it’s early for you. Why don’t we start with Dr. Hu. First, give us your Chinese name. I never want to bastardize it because I’ve heard people say it the wrong way and I always get insecure about it. But it’s a beautiful name. So tell us your name first.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Okay. Hu Xiaoyan. You know in Chinese name you have your last name first. Hu is my last name and Xiaoyan is my first name.

David Poole
Excellent. Xiaoyan, I’ve been calling your doctor for a year, so I didn’t know that your name was Xiaoyan. So talk to us about your history as a child, your path to the mission you’re on, when you discovered that this was going to be something you would spend your life doing and why you do what you do. I think that’s a great place to start.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Okay. I was raised up by my grandparents and that’s why I was very, very close to elderly people. And my dream when I was in primary school, elementary school, was to build a house for the old people so that no people, especially seniors, no senior people will be abundant or will not be taken care of. That’s my dream. And I have never thought about being a scientist or doing something else. And also the biggest challenge for me was I got a very serious head trauma when I was five. So I had a very different child life compared to others. I couldn’t even stand on my own, not much. That’s why I said maybe that’s why I get so interesting with the brain, because my brain is not that good from a very, very young age. And then I got to school, and study has always been very easy for me.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
So I became the head of the class and I went to university, college and then I went to graduate school. And then I realized I want to do something more. Still my house was not good at that time. I think I was giving the opportunity to go to school. That means a huge responsibility. To me doctor means you have more responsibility than others for the country or for the whole society. And then after I got my PhD, very lucky came to US for medical staff training and then become a research scientist and then went to Cornell medical college, becoming an instructor there. All the journey was safe to most other Chinese scientist who went to US but what made it different was that maybe because my experience when I was a child I just wanted to do more.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
So I started to become a volunteer the second year I went to US. And I started my own nonprofit organization and then started to work for the Chinese community. During that experience I started to work with many non-profit organization in US. I started to study in nutrition, naturopathic energy medicine, all that other stuff in US. Just want to help more because as a research scientist I have my own patent invention, a medication for Alzheimer’s disease. But I just found I couldn’t help people directly, which made me feel very weak. I want to help more. Everyday when I went to the community to be with them and then I said, “How can I help them now not 10 years later?” And when I take their group leader position for Alzheimer’s patients and their family members I realized that’s something I want to do.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
So every year when I came back to China, I [inaudible 000618] lots of seminars to help people understand what’s going on in their world and what research has been done in US already so that people can catch up the most updated information. And instead of being out of date. That is three and a half year ago, I decided to come back to China, to devote my 100% time to the Chinese people. The reason was that I have a lot of friends and most of my colleagues are in US. But in China, if we just come back and [inaudible 000656], it doesn’t doesn’t do much. It’s like you are with it. You cannot change anything here. So I decided to come back to China.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
I think maybe just destiny. To simply say, it’s just destiny. Maybe I was picked up to do this. I don’t know. I just felt in my heart.

David Poole
No, we’re glad you were. So what do you do today? The last three and a half years since you’ve been back and dedicated to the cause of helping the Chinese people, what are you doing now?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Doing now? Maybe two things and education. Three, a half years ago when I came back to China, I have been doing, before that, before I made that movement, I have been thinking about what I can do. And I’m just a very regular person. I just want to go. And I had done a lot of things. The advantage I have is that I know many different fields. I have been in research, in clinic, in being a consultant for investment bank. I know business. I started business in US also. I know the law and I also very, very familiar with these nonprofit organization. But what I truly different from other professionals is that I love education.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
I can do very well. I can tell what people need. I can share the information I want to share with them in the form that we can pick, [inaudible 000849] is in community with the people who do not understand science at all or to the clinicians or to the scientist. So maybe there’s something I can do. That’s why I chose to do education the first day I came back to China. I established project called NIES. N-I-E-S, which was supported by the Chinese government. And we have done pretty well. And without any financial interest from any companies, because I want us to be objective. We do not want to stand up for any like food industry or something like that. So that’s my passion.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
And the international forum, you and Jim and [Dr. Sandocane 000940] was also hosted by NIES. We’re the only host. The other thing I have been doing this year is NuCalm. And I told all my students. And now we have 16,000 students. I told my student that this year we will focus on stress management system and we will do from education, including public education and professional training. From education to NuCalm clinic and research and also one-on-one consultation set up. So we will do a series of things just to make sure NuCalm can land in China correctly. I know how much effort you guys have put into NuCalm, and I really respect that. And to show my respect is that to be very careful and very culturious to give a [inaudible 001041] protection, I can give two things education and NuCalm.

David Poole
So talk to us doctor about your experiences with NuCalm. I know that you’re a Type A and you work really hard and you don’t give yourself a break. How many times have you done NuCalm in the last year? We’ll start there.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Oh, last year. In fact before I met you and Jim, I think late October last year, I didn’t do that much. Maybe twice per week. I feel I’m always busy but after I met you two in person, I just realized I can not do things like this. So I started to do everyday. So in the last, let’s say, eight months, every day and I benefit a lot.

David Poole
And what about your students? I know that you’ve had a lot of good positive feedback when you were evaluating NuCalm. NuCalm, wasn’t a no brainer to you. This wasn’t, “Oh, wow. This is exactly what I’m looking for.” You were looking for other technologies and techniques to help with stress management. What other technologies were you’re looking at?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
In fact, and before I came back to China. And I’m personally, very into mind body medicine, I started NLP hypnotherapy and CBT and biofeedback and also music therapy and aroma therapy, all those things in US. And when I came back to China, I realized, “Okay, in order to help people, I need to train someone to become an expert or consultant or coach, at least coach in that field so that they can help people.” But the thing is that how easy can that be? It’s very hard. And for the doctors, they’re super busy. And even if I want to train them it takes a lot of time, they cannot do that. For others like nutritionist psychology center or just psychology consultants, they do not have a very strong background in biology or, let me see, medicine. So it’s hard to train them as well.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
When I realized I have been searching [inaudible 001308], in fact, last year before I met NuCalm, I have tested so many different instrument and systems, none match my criteria for the go-to for China, because in my opinion it has to be safe and easy to use and also need to be very effective. When people will say, “Oh, it’s effective.” It’s not good enough. In China, we have a lot of people, if it takes months to see a result or improvement people do not have that patience. They need to be very effective, especially in certain field. If someone has insomnia and they are taking medication, they want to get help from you. And you say, “Okay, try this, maybe one month you will see a difference.” They will ignore directly. So I don’t want to try that.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
But if you can tell them exactly what they are going to expect based on the mechanism we understand about what’s going on in their body. Like, if someone is taking [inaudible 001426] like medication, obviously, it works on the [inaudible 001431] receptor. And if that works for him and we are pretty sure in other bio signal processing discs should work for them. So we started to work from that and go that it has to be effective, very effective. And another thing is that it can be used by professionals. There’s a difference between professionals and regular people because professionals they have some idea. That’s why we separate people.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Like, the NuCalm version we have in China now you can use it by yourself and it will not hurt you. We have a standard procedure. But if you have a one-on-one consultation with the house professionals you will expect a better result. So in that case, we image NuCalm as a professional tool. So in that way, we found basically something we need. Because for all the psychological therapy methods, you truly need people. And it takes a lot of effort. And in the future, I believe technology will replace human being in certain ways. And we should see that they’re professionals we train so hard and to do more dedicated things, not just the regular.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
We wish NuCalm can help 80% of people just by itself and another 20% in the hard case of complicated cases, we can help them with our professionals. I can not find something that can compare to NuCalm, very honest. I have been looking for it.

David Poole
So doctor, can we talk for a minute about culturally? I remember when I was there, I was there for a week and every night I’d go for a walk and every night I’d see gatherings of older people doing breathing exercises, Tai-Chi in mass. I mean, I’m talking about hundreds of people in parking lots doing these exercises. And the same thing was happening in the morning. I didn’t see any young people. What are the young people do to manage stress and to… Have they adopted those or abandoned those kinds of techniques and methodologies?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Yeah. For young people, really, most of them just stay at home, watch TV, play games. Most of them.

David Poole
Sounds familiar. We started those bad habits here and passed them on to you sadly. I’m sorry about that. So let’s talk for a minute about… I know when we talk and you get really excited when you give me an update it’s usually an hour long, you don’t take a breath and it’s about the research you’re doing and the astounding results you’re seeing. Can you share with us some of the case studies you’ve been working on?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
And I told you that they’re two things I have been working on, one is education and another is NuCalm. For education, we have already hosted three international forums, which help us gain a very good reputation in three different groups of people. One is ASD, Autism. The second is Alzheimer’s. And third is ADHD group. And we have all those families with us already. So when we first introduced NuCalm to China, my idea is to help them first. They already learned how to take care of their family members through dietary intervention, through environmental medicine.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
But we want NuCalm to be another tool for those families. I think NuCalm is a great tool for whole family stress management. And when we introduced NuCalm to them, which is pretty different from what’s going on in US. And I know but from the website of NuCalm.com and you can not find that much information about [inaudible 001845] especially the new special [inaudible 001849]. And the one we use NuCalm to help all the state children we found amazing results. Like one, is for the emotion behavior sleep problems, it helps them in very short periods of time. And the parents can see the difference for the Autism.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
And after two weeks usually, the children start to show improvement in social skills, in their language skills. In order to make it more productive we ask the parents because parents are our students as well. We ask them not to change all the parameters. So that they just do NuCalm and during these month to see what’s going to happen. To not change the guide, to not add any extra exercise, to not do any other things. So we are pretty sure it can help those child to get better sleep, control their emotions [inaudible 001957] better and improve their language and social skills in one month, which is pretty amazing.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
And at the same time, I think that’s expected play. But when we see the result, we still are very, very, very happy. And we ask the parents to do the NuCalm at the same time because for those families, the parents are so anxious and [inaudible 002028] fluctuation of emotion, very strong emotion. So when parents start to have a stable emotion, they sleep better and their children started to change. The reason we know that because some children are so sensitive to the [inaudible 002048], to the eye mask, because if you touch them, they’re very, very sensitive. So we can not put NuCalm on them.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
And for those family, we have done a couple of them. And we ask the parents to use it. But when we see that parents change then the children did not use NuCalm yet. So in that case, if they showed us, we have many ways to apply NuCalm to the family oriented stress management or house management. And that’s one thing. Another is for Alzheimer, Hutchinson, NuCalm can definitely help them sleep and also when the sleep already increase, especially if they did not get up that many times at night, and then they reduce the risk to hurt themselves. And also during the daytime, they will be more active and their memories, their combination function start to be improved, especially for Parkinson’s.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
We are going to work with the hospital to do a do a [inaudible 002200] clinical trial to see how exactly it helps Parkinson’s disease, the patients, because we noticed their sleeping is reducing. The [inaudible 002215] or the way they walk start to change. Very amazing. Other things are for the [inaudible 002222] or accurate stress response And for hyperthyroid problems. It’s just amazing. For those people, I have a student who is leading a group of people that are using non drug intervention massage to help [inaudible 002245]. It’s a huge population in China. Before we used [inaudible 002249] intervention we had Dr. Gersh came last year and we have all the seven staff to help them. It worked pretty well.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
But then we found if we add stress management into it, it can be faster. And also for those people who don’t show an implement based the medication and they want to try, but they do not want to try that intervention and they start to use NuCalm, usually one to two weeks they start to say their anxiety level go down and many other symptoms have started to reduce. So we are going to work with different hospitals. Now, we have four hospitals that we are work on four different fields. And for addiction, remember I told you that we are going to work with Gansu province. And they have eight huge place, I don’t know [inaudible 002353], a places that host people, each of them have one to 2000 people in and they will stay there for two years, there many things we can do.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
And the government spent a lot amount of money to help them to quit drugs but it doesn’t work that well. And even one province start to use aroma therapy. Let’s test these measures but it won’t work, but I believe NuCalm can work. We will start from the beginning of where we cut off the drug to see how it can help to reduce the symptom or relieve some sleep problem during the first stage of their training, I will call them training. And then we have a professor who is going to host the whole project. Once Gansu province finish the project it will be an example for all the province to follow. This is how we do things here. You only need to set up one example and then others will follow.

David Poole
Wow. What are your goals for this year, Dr. Hu with not just NuCalm, but with your entire team? What do you hope to achieve this year?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Okay. So this year, first, for the stress management is a blue ocean here in China. Not much information, no reading books, not many solutions. And NuCalm is very, very special. So we will use NuCalm as a tool to build a whole stress management system. And we want the professionals who come to these field later can see how we do things, no matter [inaudible 002553]. I believe there are many other good products on the market, but we need a rule. We want to be the one who set up their standard to show, “Okay. Do not just treat on people.” And if you say your method works okay, compared to NuCalm and if you say you can help people with depression, okay, what’s the clinical criteria and what’s an assessment we are going to use? What kind of parameters we should look at even it’s biomedical or imaging?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
We want to set up the standard for some specific field. And if we do that and stress management field in China will grow very fast and also in the correct way. Otherwise, there’ll be many people using the same term in very different ways and the public will feel very confused. What exactly should we believe? And why should I believe you? Why you said is correct and why others doesn’t work? We want to use the same standard for all the people. And the NuCalm will be one to show others what our scientific tool should look like. And also this October, we will have the force international forum and the theme will be depression. That’s huge. That’s huge in China now. I don’t know the number, but based on the news in China, they said 90 leading people with depression, I don’t even know where they are.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
And now we are working with the biggest depression association here. The number they have is 16,000. So maybe there’s a lot of things we can do to help depression. We can focus on that field this year as well.

David Poole
What about teenage anxiety and stress? Are you guys going to focus on that at all?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Yes. And in fact, we already have two students who focus on, one is for the… It’s getting dark. Teenager depression and Like Kiki is one of my friend. She is working on teenager depression, and we found a serious problem here because the teenager is one who has a problem, but they do not have the right to make a decision for himself or for herself. So we are tying to change the situation here first, like get all the family members together and then start to introduce NuCalm to them. And also based on the investigation you asked and the FDA already gave the back box warning and therefore those teenagers they cannot, or they need to be very, very careful of using drugs and SSRI, antidepressant drugs.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
So it gives us opportunity to introduce NuCalm to them to help them. But now we are focusing on help them change some symptoms like, their appetite and sleep, their emotion. We have already created some case studies. Pretty impressive. And for a teenager anxiety, we work with their school who will focus on how NuCalm increase or increase their grades, make sure they can get very good grades in the exam. Otherwise, it’s hard to manage the anxiety in the teenager. I don’t know how you manage that in US, but here if you see a teenager is very anxious, the parents will say, “No, he’s fine. It’s normal to have stress.” So there’ll be argument. And we say, “Okay, let’s help your child to get better grades, get to a better school, get to a better college.” “That’s exactly what I need.” We can go from there.

David Poole
It’s interesting watching you grow the business. So it seems to me, you’re doing things around defining the categories, going the medical route. Getting the blessings from top hospitals, top government officials, and that’s how you build trust with your target market. In the US, it’s more of a, you buy media heads and you broadcast, it’s a shotgun approach and then it’s a big reach, a big funnel. It’s less about trust and more about trial and error, I think. It’s been really fascinating watching you guys grow so quickly. coming up with a bunch of case studies, we just touched on a few. Where do you see the business going in the next couple of years? What are your goals personally?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Personally, I think that’s our team goal. We had a 10 year goal when we first set up, we wanted to do one mental illness per year. So we have already done three and we will keep doing that. And this year is depression, next year anxiety. And then we go to bipolar. So for those specific mental illnesses we’ll be the first one to introduce systematic intervention, especially non-medication into non drug intervention to China. So by doing that we build our reputation and gain our credit in both common side and professional side. So that’s our basic. And for NuCalm, and this year is our first time to introduce this wonderful system to Chinese people. And we will do the clinical trial. We will do some research. We will start to work with mass media here to let more people know there’s action.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
And then from next year, that’ll be fast growing period because after these years in the national forum, and I believe more and more people will realize how important stress is and how terrible it is to live with a huge stress and from no know to know something, very easy. And it’s very, very good for a large population like China. And that’s why we want to keep our leadership in this field so that more people can follow us. And we have that confidence. When you say I work as [inaudible 003312] because I have the motivation. In China, we have a saying, like, [foreign language 003319]. That means, you are making a great product like NuCalm.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
And others may say, “Oh, that’s a good opportunity.” They will copy you. They want to try to take the shortcut. They may ruin the whole market because the quality of all the stuff they have is not as good as NuCalm. But people will say, “Oh, it doesn’t work. Something like this doesn’t work.” In order to avoid that situation we have to go as fast as we can. And also that’s why I work with the government and also their top hospitals here, because I do not want to give other people these kinds of opportunity to do wrong things. When they say how strong your background is then they will say, “Okay, do not touch the field theory.” Because they have pretty good power in this field.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
So maybe that’s a different strategy in US and China. In China, things can go very fast and with all the foundations you guys have built in the last 17 and 18 years, I have confidence that we can do pretty well here.

David Poole
How pervasive is Pharma over there?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
What?

David Poole
How pervasive is Pharma, so drugs for medicating kids and medicating adults and depression, anxiety. In the US it’s at a ridiculous amount. It’s bad news. But what’s happening in China?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
In China, it’s under diagnosed. It’s not [inaudible 003508]. They’re even not diagnosed. That’s the situation. And for people who, like for a child or for teenager often they are diagnosed and they will get medication like, 20 or 30 years ago in US.

David Poole
Let’s switch gears for just a moment doctor and talk a little bit about traditional Chinese medicine. We have discussions about that on and off. Can you talk a little about what that does? I know that you’re trying to bring it back. And that was a topic of discussion at the last international forum but what is it? What is traditional Chinese medicine and how does it work, generally?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Traditional Chinese medicine in fact to me is a philosophy. It’s not like science. It’s a different field. And traditional Chinese medicine, it’s very powerful. And we have a lot of masters. I can manage a lot of recipes and from our ancestors, but during in the last 100 years we didn’t make much progress and that we are losing. And the major reason in my opinion is that people in it do not want to open their mind. They just keep saying, “Okay, there’s no way for us to purify or to recognize what’s truly in it. There’s no way for us to standardize it.” So we just say it’s impossible. When we say it’s impossible then nothing will happen.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
I have two missions when I came back to China. [inaudible 003650] the support of my mentor. And one is to introduce the most updated information from the world to China in the house management field like nutritional medicine, environmental medicine and mind, body medicine. And another thing is that to bring Chinese traditional medicine to the world and I’m working on it. And I found that’s very interesting. It takes another strategy. If you tell them we should do this, we should be open-minded, we should use scientific medicine to… Like, the high throughput message, to find out the way to standardize our old recipe so that we can make it on a larger scale. It’s impossible.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
So from 2018, I started to introduce international experts who are Americans, to come to China to tell Chinese traditional medicine doctors what they are doing. They are doing exactly what I just recommended. So it started to change, but it takes time and our masters are getting old and old. So I hope I can do a little bit faster, but there’s our gap, the government truly wants something [inaudible 003818]. But there are people who are working in these field, like the doctors. They’re a little bit more conservative. They do want to… Like, they will tell you, “I have a recipe who can help hypertension [inaudible 003833] and how powerful it is and you will see a lot of patients and benefit from him.” And then I said, “Okay. Now, how about we work together to make it go on large scale so that more people can benefit from it?” He said, “Hmm, I do not want to give you my recipe.” I said, “Okay.” So that’s the-

David Poole
It’s a trust factor. Yeah, sure. Anything like that is hard to scale. There’s no doubt. That’ll be a very challenging exercise. Let’s pivot to some personal stuff. What do you get excited about personally Dr. Hu? When you get to do something fun, what would that be?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
In fact in US I have done a lot of things interesting. Like, I like driving a lot. In 2015, I just drove nine hours per day. And in continuously 11 days from Las Vegas to Yellowstone and come back with different path. I want to see the nature. But to me, sky, anything relating to sky is amazing. And I like skydiving. I like hot ballooning but when I come back to China the only thing, the only fun I have is working because I find this very, very interesting. Maybe I have done what I like already. Car racing, anything related to speed is very exciting to me.

David Poole
Yeah, me too. We’ll get you a motorcycle next year when we come back to China.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Sure.

David Poole
So tell us a little bit about your students and your student base and how your tracks, I mean, 16,000 students is pretty remarkable. How do you educate them? What’s the platform you use? What are they attracted to in your content?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Okay. There are many different platforms we have been using, but the major one we use is called [inaudible 004037]. It’s a very good starting and learning center platform in China. And we use it because they are very, very serious platform and then all students can find all our courses and classes on that platform. And from there, they will join our Beta group, it’s like a Facebook group in US. And in the Beta group I have assistants which are some of my students and they will be there to serve all the people, all the other students everyday.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
So we have very, very high, interactive activities every day. So if I want to announce something like, I want to tell them, “We will have the NuCalm book coming next week and we will do the pre-sale or we will have our international forum and instead of [inaudible 004139] October [inaudible 004141] we will do the preregister.’ And I just need to tell 10 people, which is my co-team member that I do not need to do anything else. So it’s so close. And if they want to find me and very easy as well they can go through WeChat and I can use most of my time very effectively just by working with 10 people.

David Poole
Wow. And your reach is 16,000 from that [inaudible 004211]?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Yeah.

David Poole
Yeah. That’s unbelievable. The magnitude of population you have in China is hard to comprehend from us, I mean, for me personally. Well, excellent. Thank you so much, Dr. Hu. I’m going to open up to some questions. That was really nice. That was really nice for you to get up this morning and spend time with us of course. It’s nice to see you again. We usually do WeChat and it’s just a dumb digital box where I can see you every day. I think we’ve some questions here.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Okay.

David Poole
We’ve got a comment from Martin. I’m impressed with Dr. Hu already within her first few minutes of speaking, what a wonderful person she is and so focused on helping others. That’s absolutely true. It’s interesting. I love technology that connects people. I love air travel, where you can get on a plane and go halfway around the world and meet people. And people are pretty similar everywhere you go. And when you meet someone special and talented and driven it sticks. So this is one of those relationships. And I told this to Dr. Hu when we first met. Our board of directors, our business advisor says, “Don’t bother with China, they’re really difficult to work with. They’re going to steal your stuff.” Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. It was always negative.

David Poole
They’ve never met you. They didn’t have the relationship with you. And when I came back, I didn’t listen. I said, “Shut the hell up. Here’s what we’re going to do. Here is why, and you don’t know Dr. Hu. We found somebody that’s just like us and is more determined.” And as a bigger challenge, we’re trying to help 300 million people in the US and others. You’re trying to help 1.4 billion people. It’s really remarkable. We’re really proud of the work we’re doing together. And really very blessed to have this relationship. We’ve got a comment. [inaudible 004406]. Adam has a question. So her role in China outreach as a partner? Is that a question? I should have read that one first, sorry for not screening it. Adam, can you clarify the question there and we can get you an answer?

Adam
Yeah. I was just wondering what her role is. I’ve been listening the whole time, but-

David Poole
I can answer that. Because I’m the one who authored an engineer and I’ve said no to a thousand requests from people around the globe, from big players to small, unique businesses. She’s doing in China what we’ve done here in the US. We spent a lot of time in November, December, January setting her up and that was it. Since then it’s been her business, her initiatives. We talked all the time and she’s literally doing the marketing, doing the business development, doing the strategic partnership, doing the IP protection, doing the translations, building the website, everything we would want to do there but would have to have an installation there and have to hire a team there.

David Poole
We started that process six years ago with a different organization and it flopped, which was another cause for our board and our advisor to be like, “Hey, we’ve already failed once why do you want to try this again?” But Dr. Hu, she talked about the efficiency of… She works with 10 people and she’s got reach of 16,000. She’s just got, and you can tell from this interview an intensity, a compassion and a drive where failure is not an option. We’re doing very little. We talked and it’s mostly about her victories and my jaw dropped I [inaudible 004556], “Wow, it took us seven years and we worked just as hard to get to that point. Holy crap.”

David Poole
So it is truly a partnership. And it’s all on gut instinct and what we can do. We’ve always said to people, “Show me what you can do, don’t tell me. I’ve heard it all. Everyone’s got a big ego, everyone’s a hero, everyone’s got tons of access and listens to them and they’re influential.” That’s great. We used to buy into that story very readily because you want to hear that, you want the fast way. Like Dr. Hu said, “You want the easy way.” Well, it never works out. And at the time when we committed those resources it was the end of the year, it was the biggest year we’ve ever had. We were pivoting to a new platform.

David Poole
There was so much complexity going on and we redirected our resources, we said, “Hey, let’s build this right for Dr. Hu because we trust her. We think she can do it. She’s already shown us enough, and then we’re done. We can just watch her grow and build a very interesting business, but do what she wants to do, which is help people.” Which is near and dear to our heart too. It’s not easy. If I could find 10 Dr. Hus, like she’s got with her group I would never have to work again, which would be really nice. So Drew, a question from you. Do you have any techniques for people whose brain nervous system can be resistant to fully relaxing with NuCalm? It’s a question for you Dr. Hu.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Yes, we do. Especially for the entrepreneurs we work with here in China and the recommendation we gave to them is that we use a disc first. Just use a disc. And after one week they started to get more relaxed and they sleep better. And then they started to use the whole NuCalm system. And the four children we have the same thing. We are not sure if their nervous system relisten to NuCalm, they just [inaudible 004800]. They just say, “I don’t know how to use it.” “Sure.” And we find a way to communicate with them. Like, we asked them to pick up the errors by themselves, the eye mask with their name on it. And we have group of people who are very good working with children. But for the [inaudible 004825] question we just use disc first to get them slowly into a stage that they would like to try.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
And for the very anxious people, we just start to talk to them and get them prepared, maybe one month later. They just need more confidence sometimes, and they need to feel it. And I remember one case [inaudible 004853] and we said, “[inaudible 004857], why don’t you just try the disc, help you relax?” She said, “I do not want to spend any money.” “Okay. Sure.” And then change of heart. We started her on a very specific diet called gluten-free diet and then one week later she feels the difference then she started to sleep better. She starts to be more optimistic.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
So we have many all the ways to help them. That’s why we are doing NuCalm very differently, because we have already had a solid background in nutritional medicine and environmental medicine. If it doesn’t work we can use other methods first.

David Poole
Thank you. A question from Adam. What is the biggest impact from NuCalm for you personally?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
[inaudible 004949] sleep less, work more.

David Poole
Oh dear. Yeah, of course. Yes. That’s a curse and a blessing. Sleep less, work more. If you want to be like Dr. Hu, the NuCalm is the product for you. A question from Deb. What is the situation when people have pacemakers? Is there no way for them to benefit from NuCalm? My husband just had one inserted. There’s no negative consequence of having a pacemaker. We use to contraindicate the quaint electrotherapy stimulation device because it was a STEM and we didn’t want to mess with the legal ramifications of someone having an untoward event with a pacemaker.

David Poole
As a matter of fact your husband’s heart’s going to beat really predictably. There’s no negative consequences to using NuCalm at all. And we’ve proven over time, and Dr. Hu can talk about this, I think she’s doing some HRV. When people do talk about HRV, they talk about the aura ring and stuff like that. We’re talking about very complex mathematical algorithms not related to consumer level instrumentation and for people with heart issues, cardiovascular issues NuCalm is a very valuable tool because it’s going to increase HRV, increase the complexity in between beats and the electrical frequency. So I would encourage your husband to use NuCalm as much as possible. Adam has a follow-up question. How much did you sleep before NuCalm and how much do you sleep now?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Because I had trauma, I slept always more than others. So before NuCalm I slept like eight to nine hours to feel pretty well during the day. And often NuCalm it’s five to six.

David Poole
Wow. I believe it. I mean, we talk all the time and I call you on a time and you pick up, which is not respectful of me, I know. I’ve got a question from [Chee 005157]. How’s the cultural difference between the Eastern and Western world impact the adoption and penetration of NuCalm in China?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
I don’t see much difference. The [inaudible 005211] difference is just how you share information with people. That’s what I’m good at. So we just use a way people can accept. Even in China we do not say Western or Eastern. And we only say for house professionals I will show them the data. I will talk about the mechanism as a neuroscientist, but for the public, and I will train my students how to share information with them. Just focus on their symptoms. They want to change. They want to improve and share information with them. If you have all the options, try other options first, before you try NuCalm. It’s a very, very useful technique. And then people say, “Okay, you are so confident.” Like, for the [June 005303] which I say, “Okay, if you purchase NuCalm, if it doesn’t work in one month then you get it for free.” We are very confident. That’s how we do things here.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
When people will say, “I’m not sure if it works for me.” I said, “Okay, you have two options. One is that you do not try it you just miss the opportunity to help yourself or your family members or you try it and gave yourself opportunity. What we can do is to reduce the risk as much as we can. So you can rent NuCalm or you can use NuCalm for free during the [inaudible 005344].” But we are asking them to exactly follow our orders. We have consulted with them the whole [inaudible 005354]. It’s not like they purchase it and not using it and by the end of the month they say, “Oh, it doesn’t work.”

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
By doing that, we get a lot of people’s attention. And then some people who are happy to use and we will start to pay more attention to it. So we are so confident about NuCalm and maybe I should give it a try. I think it works for both cultures. It doesn’t have much difference.

David Poole
According to Neil, can NuCalm help people of moderate OCD?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
We did say it helps. You didn’t see that in US. OCD is not that hard more related to anxiety.

David Poole
Okay. Yeah. Question from Rusty. I’m wondering about volume when doing NuCalm, any comments?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
For partner, and it really depends on the situation. Based on our experience not much yet, now compared to you… If I’m using it at home and do I try to turn down the volume as low as possible. And sometimes I use the [inaudible 005508] high-speed train probably [inaudible 005510], it [inaudible 005513] to cover the background noise. It really depends.

David Poole
Yeah. And Rusty to add to that, the signaling, so it’s not about the listening experience, it’s about presenting the midbrain with two disparate signals. That’s why you need the both channels. So you need to have headphones. It can be low volume, no volume. You can be legally deaf, as long as we’re presenting those signals your midbrain is going to do the math and the entrainment happens in the midbrain. But we always say, “Hey, let it be a comfortable level of volume.” In day surgeries and loud environments. Yes. You want the noise canceling turned up and you want to obfuscate as much ambient noise as possible. But at home, it’s whatever you’re comfortable with.

David Poole
Absolutely, a lot of times I’ve got some hearing issues. I’ll put NuCalm on and be in a place where I’m pretty quiet and I get blast like, “Oh my God, I’m deaf. Wow. That was really uncomfortable.” I’ll turn it down then of course I end up turning it off. A question from Adam again. You’ve got a fan in Adam, I think Dr. Hu, what is your favorite NuCalm track and which do you use most often?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Recovery two.

David Poole
That was quick. It was a good answer. It’s my favorite also. A question from Jessica, why is pericardium six the chosen point?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
I don’t think that’s a question for me.

David Poole
No, I can answer that one. I mean, you already know the answer. You’re a lot more talented in neuroscience than I am. So the pericardium six is the access point because we’re going after the pericardium which is rich in vagal nerve fibers. So it’s two and a half fingers from the joint, from the left wrist. That’s an acupressure point. If the signal is going to insert itself into your [inaudible 005705], travel up the left arm to the pericardium SAC, the pericardium SAC like I said, is rich in vagal nerve fibers, your vagus nerve is your T1 line, it integrates the brain at cranial nerve 10, exits and travels through the entire body, integrates all of your vital organs. And it’s a communication pathway all the way down to your feet.

David Poole
So we want to bring it to the pericardium SAC. It’s going to broadcast a message from there to your midbrain to slow down the over fired neurons, up regulate GABA production. Adam is very excited. Yay. Recovery two is his favorite also. I’m not sure we’re leading people to that, but Tony Robins, the same thing. A lot of people I talked to recovery two. A lot of athletes I work with. My personal favorite is recovery two. I’ve only listened to recovery three maybe once or twice. I’m very much… With someone talking about [inaudible 005802] I’ve got probably a heavier case in mile [inaudible 005805] personally. Richard has a question. When using AirPods, do you need to use pods? Yes, absolutely. That binaural delivery system is mission critical to get in the entrainment.

David Poole
Now, you can have a reduction in stress playing it ambiently. We’ve got some daycare centers that use NuCalm. They broadcast over the speakers at rest time and they’re reporting good results. It’s not scientific by any means. But you’re not going to get the same effect. London has a question. I use deep recovery one a lot. Maybe I’ll try to do recovery tomorrow. Deep recovery is new. And I can share this. And I think Martin told us the last time, he’s been using deep recovery a lot. It’s 18 months of more engineering, more horsepower. It’s a very powerful version. To me it’s like getting hit in the back of the head with a hammer. I use NuCalm for energy. I don’t use it like Dr. Hu to reduce my sleep time but I use it to pick up my energy once or twice a day. And I love the recovery track.

David Poole
And my brain is very well conditioned. I’ve been doing this for 10 years, so I’ve got a bit of a headstart. But the deep recovery, I did it three days in a row a few weeks ago in the middle of the day when I generally make time for NuCalm and I was out for over 50 minutes each time. I didn’t lack energy. I lacked enthusiasm. I didn’t care. I was like, “Hmm, my life isn’t going to get any better if I leave this environment, I’m in bed right now. This is great. I know it’s three o’clock in the afternoon but why?” I was having trouble answering that question. Three days I called Dan I said, “Dude, what are you doing? This deep recovery thing is… I need to be busy. I’m doing this because I’m overwhelmed and overworked and I can’t get enough done.”

David Poole
And he said, “Oh yeah, I probably should have warned you, do that first thing in the morning. It’s a great way to start your day. And that energy will carry you through eight, nine hours. Middle of the afternoon you can have that effect of hmm, I’m so relaxed I’m lacking ambition.” Okay. Next question, Jessica. Can you use bone conduction headphones instead of NuCalm? Yes, you can. And we can send you some recommendations. That can be very expensive, the effective ones, but we’re doing some R&D right now for the US military on phone bone conduction delivery systems.

David Poole
What kind of growth do you expect in China and to outpace the US? Hey, that’s not fair, Adam. She’s got a much bigger market and she’s much more disciplined, right? We’re silly capitalists here. We’re easily distracted. It’s been 11 years and we’re… Yes, I quit. We’re not going to outperform Dr. Hu in the head to head race. What do you think Dr. Hu?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
In facts, China has this advantage, like especially for my team. In the organization we help build is like I’m the teacher and they’re my students. So there’ll be very little argument when we make a decision. When we decided to move to one direction, we will put all our effort together, like 10 of us. And I also have partners who have very strong [inaudible 010133] either with government or with special hospitals and they are top leaders in the country already. I wish we can sell more in China, but I know that’s never been our goal [inaudible 010150], not the number of sales. Especially at the beginning I want us to go most steadily.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
Like, if we have 1000 NuCalm system out I want to know exactly who are using them. I can track them down. If I want to say, “Okay, what exactly is the problem? What the problem do they have and how can I help them more?” But in the future, maybe next year we will grow pretty fast and three years from now, not sure. And I think we just follow the flow. Do the right thing.

David Poole
No, I totally agree with that. It’s never been a money play for us. I mean, we were practically insolvent for years and all of us were personally bankrupt that’s because we believed that it was so fascinating. And you went through the same experience yourself, Dr. Hu with your students, like, “Wow, I had no idea it could help this and I had no idea it could help that. Maybe it can help this.” But we’ve got to refine the technique a little bit and educate more. It’s just been a really interesting discovery and anything about the brain is personal. We all have brains. We’re all excited by them. We’re all confused by them. We’re all intrigued by it. So if you can afford to do it and it’s a mission you accept. Once you accept a mission, you can’t stop.

David Poole
That’s the craziest part I say to people, “Hey, you want to be part of the team. You’re going to earn it.” Once you’re part of the team you can’t leave. It’s very much like a non-violent mob group or mafia group, and maybe we will be violent. No, one’s really tried to leave us yet. So I can’t tell you what those consequences might be, but it’s been a really interesting ride for all of us. Let’s see. Rusty has a comment. I’ve been using aftershocks bone head set with ignite during exercise and getting a big kick in performance personally.

David Poole
Thanks rusty for that. Dr. Hu, are you using ignite at all? No, you don’t need it. You’re naturally ignited. That’ll be a secondary application we’ll provide later, I guess. Martin has a question. Could Dr. Hu expand on a couple of our most challenging patient cases that have succeeded with NuCalm? So what are the ones that look like they wasn’t going to work and you got them converted?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
For challenging and to me, what do think as a challenging patient cases?

David Poole
[crosstalk 010433]. Martin do you have any examples or you’re just thinking… Your own personal story. I know you’ve been very dedicated to NuCalm and you’re trying to break through and you’re not getting the results you’re looking for. Right? Can’t hear you Martin.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
[inaudible 010452].

David Poole
There you go. You’re unmuted. Go ahead Martin.

Martin
Okay. No, it was just an open question to Dr. Hu what the… Some of our most interesting cases were… You’ve had great success with NuCalm where you just have very challenging cases where you weren’t sure that you could succeed with NuCalm and yet you did.

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
That’s why I said, what do you mean challenging? What kind of challenge? Is it from a TV’s part? It’s very hard house conditions that cannot be solved by traditional medicine, or it’s just challenging because a patient doesn’t work with us. It’s different.

Martin
Okay.

David Poole
[crosstalk 010543] Dr. Hu, it’s someone who’s working with you but has an extreme health condition and have you been able to convert people in that regard?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
That was really interesting. Like the [foreign language 010557], there’s no integration in China now for [inaudible 010602], the antibody. How can we get an antibody reduced? We tried dietary intervention, like [inaudible 010610]. We can get those young girls get their period back, get them started to… They’re pregnant, but still their antibody level is still high. Their immune system is not going back to normal, but often NuCalm we see the antibody goes down within two months. Is that challenging? That really interesting.

David Poole
Yeah, that’s really interesting. Do we need to increase your population? Maybe you don’t want to help those people. That’s a philosophical debate. Of course. A question from a [PurVida 010652], what is your experience working with seniors, 75 and older? Is NuCalm safe for people with pacemakers. So we answered the pacemaker question. Yes, it is. It’s safe with anybody. All we’ve done with NuCalm is mimicking your body’s own process for winding down and preparing for sleep, and we know you need to sleep to stay alive.

David Poole
So there’s nothing inorganic. So it’s very much an entrainment function. We’re using systems, mathematical models and chemistry to mimic the process of winding down. That’s really all it is. That’s why it’s safe. That’s why we can do it and leave the room and not care. It’s never going to cause an untoward event now, people who are anxious or have PTSD and have psychological issues and subconscious issues, yes, they can have an uncomfortable NuCalm experience but their heart rate is not going to increase, their blood pressure is not going to increase, their muscle tension doesn’t increase. They’re physiologically in capable of responding to the stress, but psychologically like, “Wow, I don’t really want to be here. This is a really uncomfortable place for me.”

David Poole
So the other part of the question though, for Dr. Hu is, what is your experience working with seniors, 75 and older?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu
That’s my favorite group. So I have a student who is leading a project just to cast and collect all the data from how NuCalm works for that specific group. The oldest person we have in NuCalm is 96 and the major improvement we say is that sleep quality and cognitive function. And among those people some of them already have diagnose [inaudible 010836]. And some of them are very healthy, they’re just 80 year old. They get up at night like three times. And the whole sleep quality increase. And for them, it’s hard to do the depression, anxiety assessment but we focus on sleep quality and cognitive function. Very safe, easy to use and they love it.

David Poole
Excellent. Well, that’s it Dr. Hu. We’ve come to the end of this amazing journey. Thank you so much. That was a real pleasure. I’m really excited. We know how great you are now. And now some of our mastermind participants have a glimpse of it too.

 

Can NuCalm Manage Stress and Anxiety in Teenagers?

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu is leading the research on the use of NuCalm with various populations in China.

From the benefits of NuCalm in the elderly, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s as well as children with Autism or ADHD.

 

 

“I don’t know how you manage that in the U.S., but here, if you see a teenager is very anxious, the parents will say ‘No! he is fine, it’s normal to have stress.’ So that will be an argument and we’ll say OK, let’s help your child to get better grades, to get to a better school, a better college. And that’s exactly what they need.”

— Dr. Xiaoyan Hu

 

After dealing with a head trauma as a young child, Dr. Hu developed a strong interest in education.

 

“To me doctor means you have more responsibility than others for the country or for the whole society.”

– Dr. Xiaoyan Hu

 

Tune in for a fascinating discussion on the results she has been seeing as well as how her NuCalm business is growing.

 

More About Dr. Xiaoyan Hu

Dr. Xiaoyan Hu graduated from the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, majoring in Biochemistry and Molecular Neurobiology. During her PhD, Dr. Hu took neuroscience as her lifelong research direction. In a blink of an eye, two decades have passed, but the passion about neuroscience has never changed. After graduation, she went to the U.S. for her postdoc training. Dr. Hu worked at the University of Washington School of Medicine, followed by Cornell University School of Medicine as a senior neuroscientist.

In addition to the research at medical school, Dr. Hu has been working as a volunteer in the community since the second year of her visit to the United States, and has established two non-profit organizations to provide various health science education for Chinese immigrants in the American Chinese community. In order to provide better service for the community, Dr. Hu studied social services, nutrition, natural medicine, sociology, psychology, and neuro-linguistic programming. Due to this special experience, Dr. Hu made many friends in natural medicine and other fields which laid the groundwork for her later work in China.

Why Western Medicine is Failing with Larry Trivieri

Author and integrative medicine expert, Larry Trivieri Jr. joins David Poole for a show about how to circumvent our failing Western healthcare system.

From ancient knowledge to alternative journeys and technological advances, Larry shares his 30 years of research in how to care for our health and move beyond managing disease.

 

“The journey of a thousand miles starts with the first step. But where? Larry you idiot, get in your chair, turn on the computer and take the first step, just start writing! And I did… By the end of the day I was thinking ‘Wow, I think I can do this!’”

— Larry Trivieri

 

Listen to This Is NuCalm on Apple & Spotify!

 

Larry Trivieri Jr. is a bestselling author and nationally recognized lay authority on holistic, integrative, and non-drug-based healing methods, with more than 30 years of personal experience in exploring techniques for optimal wellness and human transformation.

 



Key Takeaways

[1:00] David welcomes Larry Trivieri and asks him how he came to be an integrative medicine author — sickness forged his path.

 

[4:25] From acupuncture to homeopathy, Larry shares his journey through disbelief towards functional medicine.

 

[8:11] Los Angeles begins its siren’s song! Larry gives in and moves across the country to find that it would mark the start of his career as an author.

 

[10:00] Larry shares his writing process as it occurs while writing with doctors as well as by himself.

 

[16:15] The western healthcare system isn’t really a healthcare system, Larry shares what his perspective is and how.

 

[19:10] Stress is the underlying cause of 95% of illnesses today, Larry shares how NuCalm helps mitigate this and why this is the only device he has ever agreed to write a book about.

 

[21:05] Though we’re all different in terms of nutritional needs, diet is the cornerstone of health. Larry shares one trick to know if you’re on the right track with your food choices, and offers one simple — yet powerful — thing people can do every day to get (and stay) grounded.

 

[26:30] Want a shortcut for diaphragmatic breath? Get yourself some NuCalm!

 

[28:45] Sherry Edwards is a magnificent human, Larry shares a personal anecdote.

 

[34:20] The future of integrative medicine according to Larry is towards its roots. He also shares where to go for information as laymen.

 

[44:32] David thanks Larry for sharing so much of his process and knowledge and signs off until next time.

 

Continue on your journey and until next time, breathe deep, relax, and keep looking forward.

 

Mentioned in this episode

NuCalm

Books by Larry Trivieri

Sharry Edwards

 

This is NuCalm, the show for those looking to improve sleep quality, manage stress, and boost recovery. Brought to you by Solace Lifesciences, the makers of NuCalm, the world’s only patented and proven neuroscience technology that works within minutes, without drugs, every time! In over one million medical sessions, NuCalm has helped men and women around the world.

NuCalm: stress relief for the way we live today, technology to help you disconnect.


Full Transcript

David Poole
Good evening, everybody. My name is David Poole. Welcome to the Solace Lifesciences master series. Tonight, we’re featuring a dear friend of mine and my brother Jim’s, Larry Trivieri. We’ve known Larry, geez, I think it has been six or seven years. We’re going to talk tonight about his experience in life as an author. He’s a great author. If you look him up on Amazon you’d be very impressed, how he got into integrated medicine and how he is trying to help people through books of wisdom, inspiration. Larry, let’s start with how you got into becoming a professional writer.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
I got sick. Twice in New York. First year I slept under an air conditioner and the filter hadn’t been changed. It was the first time it was used following summer and I caught chronic bronchitis. I went to every doctor said chronic bronchitis, gave me prescriptions drug, didn’t work. I labored with it for a long time. A friend of mine called me up. She told me about this… I was living in Manhattan at the time, New York City. She told me about this Chinese woman that was in the country of illegally in Chinatown, who was living with her daughter, who was in the country legally and who was a practitioner of acupuncture. She was described to me as a miracle worker. I didn’t believe it, but I was desperate.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Long story short, I went to Chinatown. This woman didn’t speak a word of English, but her daughter did. Did all the translation. She looked at me for a minute and then she put three fingers right here. There’s a pulse that the acupuncturists use. First, no pressure, then the pressure. Jim, you might know about this, I don’t know. But anyway, from that, she proceeded to tell me my whole health history, including the year I had my tonsils out as a child, the year my head was split open by accidentally through a friend. I’m looking at her like siesta daughter, is your mother’s psychic. She translates and the mother kind of barks at me like, no, you idiot. It’s in your pulse. I didn’t know anything about this.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Next thing you know, I’m half dressed, half undressed and I look like a porcupine. She put all these needles in me and then she left. She had her daughter tell me to just lie there and she would come back when the session was over. At first, I thought it was just a waste of money and I looked foolish and blah, blah, blah. All of a sudden this really wonderful warmth started to build up, right around here. I didn’t know anything about the Meridian system. These are energetic pathways that somehow the Chinese figured out about 5,000 years. Anyway, it started to just slowly move down my body and it felt really pleasurable. It came all the way down on one side of my body, then it came all the way back up and then started to move down this side.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
It got to a point just below my belly button, and all of a sudden I felt like I was getting stabbed. It really, really hurt. I knew enough to keep breathing. What it turned out was that was where the underlying cause of my bronchitis was. I had an energetic blockage at the point, the synergy had traveled to. I just kept breathing. All of a sudden it released. I was diffused with… It just felt incredible. My whole body felt incredible. I found out later acupuncture triggers the release of endorphins in the brain, which makes you feel happy and pleasurable. But I just felt incredible. No sooner did that subside, when the woman came in, did my pulse, told the daughter to have me dressed and immediately go home and not stop anywhere. I asked why, she said, because you’re going to cough up a lot of phlegm.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
No sooner did I get home to my apartment, sounds gross, but I literally coughed up a handful of phlegm and my bronchitis went away. I couldn’t believe it. I had been to doctors, all the stuff, and the treatment costs 10 bucks. That got me curious. I started to read about stuff like that. The following year I developed a kidney stone, which was large enough or small enough to pass, but it didn’t pass. Intermittently it started causing pain. Someone told me about this man from Trinidad who was visiting. These people were all from outside of the U.S. This man from Trinidad was visiting his daughter in Brooklyn and he was an homeopath. I knew nothing about homeopathy. I went to see him, very sweet man.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Again, the consultation was very inexpensive and he kept me there for two hours asking me all these questions. None of which seem related to my kidney stuff. He was asking me, was I an active dreamer when I slept, yes. Do you sleep on your side? Yes. What side? Typically, my right side. He kept going like this. I kept going, what does this have to do with my kidney stone and very calmly, very sweetly he said patience Larry, patience. Long story short, two hours passed. He pulls out this huge book. They call it the Materia medica. It was a really ancient copy with onion paper and more like this. He goes, I just want to verify, I think I have your remedy. Yep. Then he reaches into a satchel, pulls out a little brown vile glass vile, a bottle of homeopathic remedies. He says, this is your remedy.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Now I have to tell you how to take it. You’ve never touched the tablets. You’ll deactivate their power. I’m thinking this is all woo. He had me take my first dose right then, and thereby tipping two capsules or two tablets into the top of the cap and then pouring it underneath my tongue. Not chewing it. Well, I need it to dissolve. I’m thinking yeah. Yeah. Okay. Tastes like sugar, this isn’t going do anything. He told me to repeat that process every hour on the hour until I went to bed. The next morning, he said, when I got up to pee, I would pass the stone and it would be painless. I thought it was nonsense again, despite having been cured of bronchitis from acupuncture, but I did what he told me.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Every hour on the hour before I went to bed I took two capsules under my tongue. Didn’t chew them. Let them dissolve. Next morning, I get to pee. All of a sudden, my stream shuts off and then stone pops up and the rest of my urine popped out. I felt this incredible energetic rebalancing. I passed the stone after struggling with it for about two months. Just as he said, it was painless. I called his daughter to thank him and she said, oh, he’d be so happy to hear this but he already flew back to Trinidad last night, blah, blah, blah. Well, now I was really, really curious. From that point forward, I didn’t have any other health issues, but I was really baffled that doctors, mainstream doctors didn’t know about this stuff.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
I started to read about it. I started to check out different therapies. Over the course of about three years, I became pretty well informed about these therapies, how they work, I’d experienced it for myself. In the end of 1990, the beginning of 1991, I started having a whole series of dreams that I was supposed to move to Los Angeles. I resisted at first, but the dreams are very powerful and they kept saying you’re supposed to move to Los Angeles. Finally, I said, okay, I’ll move to Los Angeles. I was a complete fish out of water there. I didn’t even have a car at the time. I’ve lived in Manhattan for 11 years, completely different environment. Well, anyway, long story short, once I got there, by this time I had written articles and things of that nature. I really wasn’t making a living as a writer, but I was writing professionally. I met the guy who ended up becoming my mentor and their friend Burton Goldberg. We created an encyclopedia called alternative medicine, the definitive guide.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
From that, I got to meet literally hundreds of top doctors and other health practitioners from all around the world. I also got to meet their patients. Many of whom were had been given up for dead, particularly the cancer patients that were not alive 10, 15, 20 years later, complete remission. That was my education. It took about two and a half years to create that book. It went on to become a major self published bestseller. It’s sold about 800,000 copies in two editions. From there I had my career. I had met a lot of doctors. I stayed in touch with all these doctors and I added more doctors to my network of friends, and people I consult with. That was from 91 through 94.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Since then, I’ve been writing books ever since. I’ve written, currently working at my 33rd or my 34th book. As David said, I met him and Jim about seven, six, seven years ago. One of the books I wrote with my friend, Dr. Michael Galitzer was “A New Calm” which we’ll be updating since the technology has changed so much since then, and that’s my story.

David Poole
Larry, can you walk us through the writing process? You’re not writing an autobiography, you’re writing about what other experts in the field learn, understand, and want to capture and share, and then their patient experiences. Walk us the process where like you and Dr. Galitzer, when you guys decided to work together on a book.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Well, Michael’s book was easy. I had known Michael for long time. I knew most of the stuff that he wanted to put in the book. Most of the books, I do the actual writing, but a lot of times I co-write them with doctors. What I’ll do is with the doctor, I’ll create a table of contents based on what they want to write about. I tip the creative and then the doctor and I will then flush it out and create a synopsis or an outline of each of the chapters. I have my roadmap. Chapter one is going to cover all these things, chapter two, et cetera. Then I write it. I’ve been doing this now for so long that I have a really, I’m not bragging, but I do have a strong working knowledge about most of these therapies and how they work and how they could be useful for a wide range of health conditions.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
I’ll write each draft of the chapter, I’ll send it to the doctor or whoever else my co-author is, and they’ll review it. Sometimes the last minute, make some additions. Sometimes they’ll say this is great unto the next one. That’s how it typically works. From my own books, that I write by myself, I just rely on that information that I’ve gathered over almost 30 years. I stay current with the research. If I need to call some doctors and I’ll pick their brains and sometimes I’ll fold in their information in the book, if it’s appropriate. That’s what I’ve been doing. I’ve done that as a said for about 30 something books. Some of them I’ve ghostwritten. I don’t have my name on the title. But most of them are either co-written or written by myself.

David Poole
Can you share with us. Larry, the writing process? Do you start with the thesis statement and go? Is it linear for you or do you just write down notes and stack them together?

Larry Trivieri Jr.
No, I don’t write down notes. I typically, once I have a discussion… If I envisioned the project on my own, I usually get the table of contents very quickly. It’s not later at all. It’s just kind of a right branding experience. I just sit down and write down the table of contents. It just comes to me quickly. If I’m doing it with a doctor based on his or her research, then I have a discussion with them first. Then based on what they say, I’ll create a first pass at a table of contents, and then we may have to fine tune. Then once it’s done, as I said, I have an outline of each chapter. I know what needs to go in each chapter. I know what sequence it needs to be in, and then I just write it accordingly.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
You and I talked the other day, David, about writer’s block. I don’t get writer’s block because I’ve been doing it so long. The only time I ever had writer’s block in my life was when it was early in my career. After I’d done the guide, they moved back here to Utica. I was looking at Los Angeles when I worked with curtain and I decided I wanted to continue being a health writer. As soon as I put that intention strongly inside of myself, I got a call from an acquaintance of an acquaintance. He had had lunch that day. He was based in New York City. I’m in upstate New York. He had lunch that day with someone who had become, he’d just been appointed as the senior editor for John Wiley & Sons, which is a very old and very prestigious publishing company.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
They started in London more than 100 years ago. His bailiwick was going to be self-care books, self-help and health books. The guy that called me who had had a meeting with him that day, a lunch meeting, asked him now that you’re the senior editor, what type of book do you want to publish? He reached in his briefcase and he pulled out the guide and he goes, have you seen this book? It’s taken the whole publishing world by storm. It’s self published. It’s sold hundreds of thousands of copies; blah, blah blah. I want to do a book just on the therapist. The guy he’s having lunch with this, I just met the editor and writer of that book. I was put in touch with this guy and long story short, very rapidly, I had a conversation with, and they asked me to create a proposal. I did. He accepted it. He took it to the bean counters. I call them the people that approved the contract. I was awarded a contract.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Now for the first time in my life, after dreaming about it for years, I had a book contract that I was solely responsible for. The first month after I received that contract, I was basically paralyzed with fear because I was overthinking it as I got, there was so much to do and how do you do it? Then I remembered, I don’t know if it’s Lao Tzu but anyway, the journey of a thousand miles starts with the first step. It’s like, Larry you idiot? Get in your chair, turn on a computer, take the first step. Just start writing and I did. By the end of the day, I was like, wow, I think I can do this and I did. Oddly enough, that book ended up becoming, it was never intended to do so, but it’s now used widely as a recommended reference texts in medical schools across the United States and Canada, which amuses me because I’m a college drop off.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
My education was getting to know all these doctors back in the time I was working with [inaudible 001556]. That was my true college education. But anyway, so that’s how my process goes. I typically write in the afternoons. I’ll typically research in the morning if need be. Otherwise, I’ll just catch up on email and do some exercise, whatever else I need to do. Typically, I’ll write four or five hours a day. That’s been my process for years.

David Poole
Thanks for sharing that Larry. What are some of the secrets that you’ve learned that frustrate you when you see what’s happening in the world of medicine and traditional Western medicine? What should we know about in terms of like supplementation or how to beat cancer? Every time I call you, I’ve got duty and ailment or something. I say, and you say, well, geez, Dave. It’s abundantly obvious to me what to do.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Well again, I stand on the shoulders of all these wonderful doctors that I’m friends with and I’ve learned from. What frustrates me the most is that I don’t want to get too conspiratorial, but our healthcare system is not a healthcare system. It’s a drug and symptom management system. It’s controlled by the pharmaceutical industry. It has been for many years. They pretty much control most of the curricula that medical schools teach medical students and blah, blah, blah. For instance, given an example, the average medical school education, if you’re going for an MD in the United States is eight years. During that entire eight year period, I’m not making this up, the average medical student gets 23 total hours of education in nutrition and diet, which is the most foundational aspect of health. Garbage in, garbage out. Good gas, you get good performance.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
They don’t know the first thing, doctors. It’s not their fault; it’s the system’s fault. They’re not trained to know anything about anything that has to do with health. When I talk about our healthcare system, always say, we don’t have them and we haven’t had them. Health is not about getting rid of symptoms, it’s far more than that. It’s basically similar to the experience you have when you have a great NuCalm session. When you’re done with the NuCalm session and if it really works, you’re ready to go. You’re charged up, you’re energized, you’re relaxed, you’re optimistic. Your stress levels are way down. All these things that NuCalm does to you, you can do for yourself as well if you learn how to. We’re not talking about too. That’s my biggest frustration.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Now tying into that without babbling too much, so what do people need to do on their own? Well, I just wrote a whole book about that, which hasn’t come out yet because this COVID nonsense has impacted the publishing industry quite severely, but it’s called No Doctors Required, and it actually features my recommendations plus the recommendations of 15 really top health experts. What you can do from a self-care perspective. First and foremost, you probably know what this is, David. First and foremost, it starts with stress. Stress is the underlying cause of 95% of all illness in our country. This doesn’t come from me. This comes from people like Bruce Linton who’s a performer Stanford University, a PhD. It’s been documented by the NIH. It has been documented by all sorts of different studies.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
People don’t know how to manage their stress. That’s why I was so impressed with NuCalm when I first experienced it. That’s why I wanted to write a book about it. It’s the only book I’ve ever written that is about a specific product. I’ve had offers to do this in the past, but I’ve never put my name on a book just to write a book about a product until I experienced NuCalm. It was based on my experience with it. Way back in the day, the first tracks and different headphone and the CES and all that stuff and the cream. Actually wouldn’t even have the cream at that point. We had the tablets, the [inaudible 004657] tab. As soon as I experienced for the first time, it was like, Holy, I got to do this every day. And so I have.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
I don’t do it every day now, I do it about three or four times a week. It’s made a tremendous difference, not only in terms of my stress levels, but also my physiology, because I don’t have the stress. I don’t really have a lot of stress to begin with, but this is dramatically improved my resilience during stressful times, which we’re all in right now. Obviously because of the lockdowns and all the other stuff that’s going on, and all the fear associated with the virus. I don’t have those fears. I don’t have most of the frustrations that most of the people I personally know are experiencing. Unfortunate, I make my living out of my own so I define myself as an essential worker and so I keep working. That’s where it starts. It starts with stress management and then of course diet, but there’s no cookie cutter formula. I can’t tell you what to eat.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
If I did, I’d be doing it just service because we’re all biochemically and bio energetically unique. For instance, a paleo diet might be perfect for some people, a low fat, high carb diet, as long as it’s healthy carbs and healthy fats might be far more appropriate for another person. You have to determine what’s good for yourself. I can share something right now that you can do to help you figure out if the foods and beverages you’re consuming are good for you. You basically get in a state of relaxation, sitting down, not lying down, sitting down and take a pulse. Count your pulse. Right here in your carotid artery. 20 minutes before you eat.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Just notice what your pulse is. You don’t even have to do it for a minute, just for 20 seconds. See how many beats you feel and then multiply that by three. There’s your pulse per minute. Then eat or drink. 10 minutes after you’re done eating, do the same thing. If your pulse rate has gone up by 20% or more of your original pulse count, you have a sensitivity to that food, which means at that point in time, that food was not necessarily good for you or that beverage. Obviously you can’t do it if you eat a whole meal, you have to do it food by food. If you suspect you have a food sensitivity, everyone talks about food allergies, but 98% of food allergies are actually sensitivities.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
If you suspect you have one, just do that and eat that same food three or four days in a row alone, without anything else. Do the pulse count before and after. If it’s consistently elevated by 20% or more after you eat the food, don’t eat the food. At a certain point, your body may adjust where you’ll be able to reintroduce that food. But for at least a few months, don’t eat that food. Very effective. Hardly anybody knows about it, but it works. A doctor developed it. I’m at a loss to come up with his name right now, but it’s named after a doctor.

David Poole
Larry, can you talk for a minute about grounding, and the work you’ve done with Steven Sinatra, and that whole phenomenon?

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Yeah, that’s another wonderful thing anybody can do. Get outside, barefoot, on the grass, even on concrete, but not tarmac, not paved streets or something like that. But you also want to be careful that you’re doing it in a field or lawn that doesn’t have a lot of electrical wires running underneath it because otherwise you’ll pick up the electricity from the wires. This is all discovered by a man named Clint Ober, O-B-E-R, who then, Dr. Steven Sinatra found out about and did his own double-blind studies with, improved how effective it was for reducing chronic inflammation in the body. There are two things that cause disease and perpetuate disease, chronic stress, chronic inflammation. If you’re chronically stressed, you’re going to be chronically inflamed, even though you may not know it.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
If you can reduce both of those levels, you’ll start to shift back towards health. He brought Ober and started to do testing on people. All you need to do is go outside anywhere from 20 to 60 minutes a day and do it. If you want to do it for a full hour, you can do it in the morning after your lunch break and maybe before you eat dinner, 20 minutes at a time. You just stand barefoot on the ground. The ground has a negative charge. Mother earth has a negative charge. What that does, your feet absorb that negative charge. It reduces the inflammation. It’s more complicated than I can get into now. There’s actually a book called “Earthing”, which is another name for grounding that Dr. Sinatra and Dr. Ober wrote, which I highly recommend. It’s a great book.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
There’s a lot of research validating the effects of grounding that they conducted and other researchers have conducted. Really simple. Doesn’t cost anything. Now, in the winter, obviously Erica and I, David, we live in, where it snows a lot. If you have a basement that has a cement floor, you can actually get most of the same benefits, by just grounding yourself barefoot on the basement. You don’t have to go outside in the cold. Really simple thing. You can do it every single day, and it won’t cost you anything except 20 of the 60 minutes of your daily life.

David Poole
According to Dr. Sinatra, 20 minutes is the minimum kind of exposure time?

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Yeah. Similar to meditation. Like TM is 20 minutes, twice a day can sit on meditation. You can get a lot of benefit if you do things. Even also, another thing I can share is, breathing exercises. With NuCalm, what you’re doing is you’re putting your physiology in your brain chemistry into a parasympathetic dominant state, which is rest and restore and recover as opposed to a sympathetic state, which is fight and flight syndrome. Well NuCalm does it far more powerfully, but you can get similar benefits just by breathing through your diaphragm. Deep breathing. In other words, if you want to find out if you’re breathing properly through your diaphragm, put your hand on your chest, put your hand on your belly and take a breath in and out through your nose and see which hand moves. Ideally, your hand on your belly will move outward far more than the hand on your chest.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Most people are shallow breathers. They breathe through their chest. This hand will move. You don’t want that. You want the belly. If you ever look at traditional martial artists from China or Japan, they’re not into that six pack belly. Most of them have have what’s called a soft belly. It’s almost like a little potbelly. It’s really soft but if you watch them breathe, it’s inflating and exhaling like a balloon, particularly when they’re competing. Well, if you take a deep breath, in and out without pause, it should not be rigorous. It should be very relaxed. Just as if you’re sighing. You do that 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 20 minutes a day, you’ll start to train your physiology to be more in a parasympathetic state. It’s very useful for instance, when you don’t have NuCalm with you. You might be in a meeting and you’re getting stressed out. If you’re going just remember to start taking those deep breaths, you’ll calm your physiology therefore you’ll calm your brain. You’ll be more effective in the meeting, et cetera.

David Poole
You’re telling me after 51 years of working out, my 12 pack is not cool.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
You don’t need it. Soft belly. I have a soft belly.

David Poole
Jim is in good shape. He’s been working the soft belly angle. One of my favorite stories, Larry, of all the stories I’ve heard you tell is your experience of Sherry Edwards. Can you share your experience with her and the whole frequency phenomenon?

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Well, that’s a long story. Sherry’s one of the most interesting and wonderful people I’ve ever met. She was born with the ability to hear sound emanating from people’s bodies. She was also born into a rural area in Ohio, where there’s a lot of superstitious people. When she was about six years old, one of her relatives came to visit. By this time, Sherry thought everybody had this ability just like everybody can see, everyone could talk. Anyway, this relative came in and prior to that, whenever Sherry interacted with anybody, they were healthy. She heard a full spectrum of sound, do re mi fa so la ti do. She heard the whole scale. This relative came in, who Sherry loved. I believe it was either an aunt or a grandmother, but anyway, the woman came in and there was a missing note.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
That’s how Sherry interpreted it as a six-year-old and the woman laughed. She told her parents she’s going to get sick. She’s not right. Then they thought she was nuts. Well, it turned out a few years, or a few months later, she was diagnosed with cancer, the woman, and died. By that time, Sherry’s parents took her seriously. Sherry, if she determinate and have all the notes in there, what she calls the signature sound, she would say, you’re going to get sick as a little girl. They would. [inaudible 003202] these people in our community. I’m laughing, but it was actually kind of sad. They thought she was possessed by the devil. I’m not making this up. She stopped. She basically suppressed her ability. She could still hear, but she never told anybody anything more.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Then when she got to college, she became close to one of her professors who was really intrigued with her, because she’s a bright person. Anyway, he mentored her and at certain point of their mentorship, she felt comfortable enough that maybe he would understand and have an explanation for what her ability was. She shared it. She shared it with him and as soon as she did, he got all excited. He goes, come with me. He took her to the research lab and there just been a study that he had read that had recently been published that proved that the air, our ears emanate sound frequencies. We don’t only hear sound frequencies, our ears emanate them. That’s what she was picking up on. He did a lot of research with her, verified her abilities, and she has the ability vocally, which is amazing.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
She could produce sounds with her voice that are unlike anything I’ve ever heard. They’re absolutely beautiful. I wanted to interview her and meet her. I wrote a book years ago, one of the only two books of mine, it’s out of print, but I’ll send David a link. He can send it to you. I put the entire book online on a WordPress page. Anyway, there’s an interview with her in the book. When I spoke to her initially, she didn’t know me from Adam. We were just on the phone. Would you like to hear your signature sound, Larry? I said, yeah, sure. Not knowing what to expect. She produces for lack of a better term, it was like she was a human synthesizer creating the most beautiful harmonic sound. I was holding the phone like this. I didn’t want it to stop.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
It was incredible. Well, anyway, so we’d become friends and obviously she has this gift, but most people obviously don’t. She’s found a way to reproduce her ability to diagnose things via computer. If you go to her website, it’s sound health.com or something. Sound health portal, sound health portal.com. She’s given away a ton of information for free. You can literally download her programs. You can self-analyze your voice, it’ll pick up. There’s one program, for instance, it can tell you, where are you nutritional deficiencies are that day. What you should consider eating, because for that particular day, you don’t know the frequency for say vitamin C or vitamin D or whatever. It’s just a brilliant woman. I’m trying to get her to meet David and Jim, because I really think there’s a tremendous potential and overlap for what she’s doing in the technology of the Blake’s come up with. She’s truly one of the most remarkable people I’ve ever met. She’s also one of the humblest and her work is definitely worth knowing about.

David Poole
That’s very cool. Thanks for sharing. Larry, where do you think integrative medicine is going? It’s funny how their platform is based on thousands of years of medicine. How far back do you need to go and where can they go in the future with all of the technology advancements without the pollution of –

Larry Trivieri Jr.
If you trace the origins of “integrative medicine,” where do you end up? If you go back in time. You end up with traditional Chinese medicine. You end up with the Ayurvedic system of India. They’re both between 3,000 and 5,000 years old. Now, apparently all those many years ago, and this was always intrigued the heck out of me. There wasn’t that much commerce between India and China and yet they both came up with these systems that in many respects are very similar in acupuncture. You had the acupuncture points in the meridians, and I have a reading of the chakra system. You have, what’s called the naughties. In traditional Chinese medicine, you have Tai chi and Qi gong. Ayurveda have yoga and pranayama exercises, the breathing exercises on and on. But if you go back and I had to do this for the book I told you about that I was paralyzed to write originally.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
There was a chapter in there about traditional Chinese medicine and the chapter about Ayurvedic medicine. I did a lot of research because I love history. Their perspective was really fascinating. This goes back, like I said, 5,000 years. They looked at human beings first and foremost, as systems of energy, bio energetic systems. They both look at health and disease from that perspective. If you’re healthy, you have a vibrant bioenergy system. All systems are go, your energy is flowing freely. If you’re not healthy, you’re deficient in some level of energy. Where I see integrative medicine going is away from biochemistry and back towards bioenergy because as my dear friend, Valerie Han another brilliant woman and scientist, and also mystic that I was privileged to know and write about. She’s also in my book, it’s called Health On the Edge. I’ll send David a link. He can send it all to you so you can read it for free.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
But anyway, Valerie had a saying that chemistry is the downstream event from energy. For instance, why is it that some people do everything right, “from a biochemical perspective.” They have a healthy diet. Everything’s organic. They exercise, they’re taking the proper nutritional supplements that their doctor says they need, and they stay sick. The answer is because they’re dressing their symptoms for biochemical level, but what really needs to be addressed is the bio energetic level. What impacts negatively on bioenergy? Unresolved emotions, past life, past event trauma, something that might’ve happened to you that you always get upset about if you think about, limited beliefs, things of that nature, poor breathing. Breathing is the interface between what I call spirit and the physical.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
What acupuncture does, what certain Ayurvedic practices do, what a lot of new energy medicine techniques do, is they free up that energy and they heal the associated traumas, beliefs, unresolved emotions that science has literally proved resonate at the cellular level. These are called cellular memories. As long as you have those cellar cellular memories, you’re always going to be the effect of them whenever they get triggered or reanimated. That’s where I see it going. Michael Galitzer who you know well, David. Michael is one of the pioneers of conventional MD who moved into integrative medicine. When you go to his office, he has all these different devices, energetic devices, where he can tell you very accurately, okay, this is off. This is off. In ways that even the most sophisticated CT scans, MRI scans, things of that nature cannot do, because they don’t pick up everything that’s going on in the energy field, which is commonly called the aura, which exists.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
It’s been proven scientifically to exist. That’s where I see it going. But the most wonderful thing about it all that makes me the most optimistic about the future is, the more we become aware of this, the more we will gain control over our own physiology and health and wellbeing, because there are so many self-help techniques we can do that will maximize the energy levels of our bio energy systems. Ideally, everything I write, I try to write in a way that empowers the reader to not have to rely on an expert. In other words, sure. You want to try NuCalm. You have to go get new calm, or you have to work with a practitioner. But if you can’t afford it, or if you don’t want to get it, try these breathing exercises, you’ll at least get some benefit that way or try this or try that.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
There’s a lot of information that you absolutely require a competent health practitioner to help you with, but at the same time, there’s even more information on what you can do on your own, because that’s my own personal orientation to life. Self-reliance. Despite knowing all these doctors, I rarely ever go to doctors for anything. I monitor my own wellbeing because my body gives me a signal. I don’t wait until it gives me a real hard signal. It’s like, Oh, okay. What’s that twitch telling him. I know enough now to usually I can figure it out on my own.

David Poole
Larry, you have an advantage because you’ve done 30 years of dedicated research and you’ve got great partners and thought partners. What happens to us? We’re all going to get sick, it’s inevitable. What happens to us –

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Hold on. It’s not inevitable. That’s not another law. That’s an erroneous belief. Get rid of that. Cancel that right out.

David Poole
I was just testing you.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
It’s just as easy to say every day in every way, I’ll get better and better and better. I’m getting better. That’s [inaudible 004254]. You know about him? He was a French physician. He actually told his patients to repeat that out loud. I’m translating obviously, it’s English because he was French, but it’s every day in every way and getting better and better and better. He instructed them to do that before they went to sleep. Get in bed, turn off the lights, don’t fall asleep yet. 10 times. Then when you wake, before you get out of bed, say it again, 10 times. People think it’s nonsense, but it’s an actual affirmation that he proved helped relieve all sorts of serious ailments that his patients had. Every day and every way, I’m getting better and better and better.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
However, to make it work most effectively, you don’t say it the way I just say it. You say it in a very soft voice, almost as a whisper because, if you ever noticed in your room, if you’re in a room or a restaurant and you hear someone whispering what happens to your attention? You’d be having the most fascinating conversation with someone right in front of you. Someone over here is whispering. Most of your attention goes to the whisper. When you whisper to yourself, the same thing happens. Your unconscious really pays attention.

David Poole
Very cool.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Yeah. That’s why… I don’t mean to interrupt you but yeah.

David Poole
No, you’re not interrupting. I was just curious, where do we go as laymen for reliable source to get information about, like you just said, “Hey, I got a soft warning about something happening in my body.” I’m not going to go to my general practitioner for example.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Well, you can read some of my books. A good book, actually was one I wrote with Michael. It’s based on his expertise. Outstanding health is the title of it. You can find that as both e-book and a trade paperback. Sherry Edwards’ site has a lot of stuff you can download or use just through the microphone on your computer. That can give you a lot of information. You can email me. Larry Trivieri, gmail.com, T-R-I-V @gmail.com. If I can help you, I will.

David Poole
I just want to ask one question completely unrelated. What’s the most favorite concert you ever went to?

Larry Trivieri Jr.
Pink Floyd, 1975. Erica Kingston, Canadian football league stadium. Kingston, Ontario. Wish you are here chemo two or three months after the concert. This is in 1975 again. In a football stadium. They had the most clear sounds system I’ve ever experienced. It was [inaudible 004612]. It was incredible. They did all dark side the moon together concert with a film that corresponded with it. This is before anybody was doing videos and stuff like that and it went on from there. In terms of just shear spectacle and upliftment, and just awe, it was Pink Floyd 1975.

David Poole
Nice.

Larry Trivieri Jr.
I’ve seen over a thousand concerts –

David Poole
I know and that’s why I asked. That’s why I asked. Well, thanks Larry, I really appreciate it.

 

Is There A Healthier Type Of Medicine?

Author and integrative medicine expert, Larry Trivieri joins David Poole in an episode of This Is NuCalm.  Trivieri shares how to circumvent our failing Western healthcare system.

From ancient knowledge to alternative journeys and technological advances, Larry shares his 30 years of research in how to care for our health.

 

“The journey of a thousand miles starts with the first step. But where? Larry you idiot, get in your chair, turn on the computer and take the first step, just start writing! And I did… By the end of the day I was thinking ‘Wow, I think I can do this!’”

— Larry Trivieri

Tune into this insightful discussion, as Larry elaborates on how stress is an underlying cause of illness, and how he turns to NuCalm as an aid.

“People don’t know how to manage their stress. That’s why I was so impressed with NuCalm when I first experienced it. That’s why I wanted to write a book about it.”

– Larry Trivieri

 

Listen in as Trivieri shares intricate details on everything from writing to medicine!

 

More About Larry Trivieri Jr. 

Larry Trivieri Jr is a bestselling author and nationally recognized lay authority on holistic, integrative, and non-drug-based healing methods, with more than 30 years of personal experience in exploring techniques for optimal wellness and human transformation. During that time, Trivieri has interviewed and studied with over 400 of the world’s top physicians and other health practitioners in over 50 disciplines in the holistic health field.

Trivieri is the author or co-author of 20 books on health, including Outstanding Health: The 6 Essential Keys To Maximize Your Energy and Well Being – How To Stay Young, Healthy and Sexy For The Rest Of Your Life, The Acid-Alkaline Lifestyle, The Acid-Alkaline Food Guide, Juice Alive, The American Holistic Medical Association Guide to Holistic Health, The Self-Care Guide to Holistic Medicine, and Health On The Edge: Visionary Views of Healing in the New Millennium. He also served as editor and principal writer of both editions of the landmark health encyclopedia, Alternative Medicine: The Definitive Guide, and has written over 200 articles for Internet-based health sites. He has also written numerous feature articles for a variety of publications, including Alternative Medicine, for which he also served as contributing editor from 1999 through 2002; Natural Health, Natural Solutions, and Yoga Journal. He has also been written about in a number of national publications, including The Washington Post.

Trivieri is dedicated to sharing the wealth of potentially life-saving information he has learned about with as wide an audience as possible in order to help usher in a new era of wellness and health care in the 21st century. To that end, he also lectures about health nationwide, and has been a featured guest on numerous TV and radio shows across the United States. He is also the author of the all-age tale of adventure The Monster and Freddie Fype.

To find out more about, Larry Trivieri visit him on Facebook or contact him at larrytriv@gmail.com 

 

You Don’t Have to Be the Best, Just Do The Best You Can with “Air Force Ken” Corigliano

“Air Force Ken” Corigliano joins This Is NuCalm today to share his incredible journey from a terrible brain-damaging accident to qualifying for the Olympics, becoming a Major in the Air Force, and, oh, did we mention he served in Iraq and won a medal for heroism?

You really don’t want to miss this talk about how to set goals, achieve them, and overcome incredible odds in your journey towards optimal performance.

“I believe that athletics is a fantastic way and training and working out is a great way to systematically and precisely exercise the stress response in a controlled format for a beneficial outcome versus a destructive outcome or an uncontrolled outcome.”

— Ken Corigliano

 

Listen to This Is NuCalm on Apple & Spotify!

 

Ken lives a life of service to others and has over 20 years of wearing the service member’s uniform, loving nearly every minute of it. He brings the joy of being alive and being human to the people of the world. Ken has generated and influenced many things you enjoy today, without expectation of return. Many companies and organizations seek out his advice. He has owned trademarks, copyrights, and patents many times while knowing that Ideas are never original and are always a result of life influences.

To find out more about Ken Corigliano, visit his website.



Key Takeaways

[1:00] David welcomes Ken Corigliano and asks him to share the journey that took him to where he is today — a Major in the Air Force — by way of a disadvantaged childhood, a troubled academic journey, and a terrible accident that left him with some spinal cord and brain damage. Enter NuCalm!

 

[6:00] Ken has synesthesia, he shares what exactly he can see, taste and smell, and it’s really weird.

 

[7:00] A few weeks before deploying, Ken was in a horrible car accident. He opens up about finding out the extent of the damage while in a war zone.

 

[9:45] From injury to superpowers, Ken shares when he figured out what his synesthesia could help him do — and the overwhelming aspects of it.

 

[12:33] From failing the Air Force fitness test — an embarrassing moment — Ken shares his process for achieving his goal of having a shot at the Olympics.

 

[14:57] On winning a medal for heroism.

 

[18:45] Academic excellence requires work; Ken shares the dedication he applied to both his studies and triathlon competitions. His TBI interrupted his Ph.D., he couldn’t read anymore.

 

[20:18] Ken shares how he integrates NuCalm and Ignite, as well as why training your stress response is the key to optimal fitness.

 

[27:05] Ken did some outrageous tests with NuCalm! He shares some of the protocols he ran (ice baths? Yup).

 

[32:25] A week in the life of Ken’s training regimen is both fascinating and a little scary! He also touches on what he does to prepare for competition; it is a handful, take out your pens!

 

[40:13] Travelling with NuCalm is something that Ken calls the most amazing unsung benefit. He also touches on his diet both personal and professional, and while competing.

 

[44:45] Any R&R? Ken shares his downtime and takes a moment to highlight his awesome wife’s accomplishments! He also touches on how NuCalm has helped his three-year-old son maximize his potential.

 

[50:45] David asks Ken what his next big accomplishment is going to be and thanks him for sharing all of his experience before signing off until the next episode.

 

Continue on your journey and until next time, breathe deep, relax, and keep looking forward.

 

Mentioned in this episode

NuCalm

Air Force Ken

 

This is NuCalm, the show for those looking to improve sleep quality, manage stress, and boost recovery. Brought to you by Solace Lifesciences, the makers of NuCalm, the world’s only patented and proven neuroscience technology that works within minutes, without drugs, every time! In over one million medical sessions, NuCalm has helped men and women around the world.

NuCalm: stress relief for the way we live today, technology to help you disconnect.


Full Transcript

David Poole
Welcome, everybody. It’s my great pleasure to introduce you to Ken Corigliano. His code name internally, when I first heard about Ken, was Air Force Ken. We met at CES, the Consumer Electronics Show, probably four years ago, and Ken quickly became a power user and then quickly a big fan of NuCalm, but more importantly, just a nice, genuinely good guy. Ken is a lifelong Air Force person, he’s now a major in the Air Force after being an enlisted man, which is no small feat. And he’s one of the top athletes across all the branches of the U.S. military.

David Poole
So let’s get started, Ken, by first, talk to us about your path to the Air Force and then your struggles and setbacks and accomplishments and how you kind of reached the path of glory that you’re on today.

Ken Corigliano
All right, so I do like to have a conversation with folks and with everybody, so I’ll speak a little bit and then we can kind of go down certain rabbit holes or whatever you guys are interested in, just make sure I’m hitting the nail on the head. But I grew up a disadvantaged young man, I was homeless for a little bit and I got kicked out of schools multiple times, more than once, so I didn’t really have that great of a future. But I was lucky enough to meet a guy who was in the Air Force who told it to me straight, and I really respected that. I liked the immediate feedback approach to mentorship, and it really appealed to me.

Ken Corigliano
My test scores were not great and I didn’t really feel like I deserved a good job, relatively speaking, so I told him to put me in the dirtiest, grossest job there is, and that’s aircraft mechanics. So I was a crew chief on an airplane, which just happens to be the first one that was overseas after 9/11, so that was very fortunate; I got some experience there and I actually got a medal for heroism that was signed by the president, and I got commissioned as an officer. So I went back and went to school at a school called St. Leo University in Florida, and then I was able to get a gubernatorial fellowship and I was able to kind of catch a rising star and be part of that momentum for a while on my trajectory up.

Ken Corigliano
Also fell in love with sports while I was in college because I failed my fitness test as an officer candidate and they disenrolled me from the program, and I learned hardcore that your past doesn’t mean much unless your present is secured and is meaningful and valuable. So fell into sports, and then became a world-class athlete. I actually went to Beijing for the Olympics in 2008 as a liaison and as an observer, got a letter to the Olympic team for 2012, got into an awful accident right before the trials, and that’s kind of where we are now with NuCalm.

Ken Corigliano
I damaged my spine and I got brain damage, affected my monkey mind, my reptilian brain was damaged. At that point they didn’t really understand TBIs, except for the executive-level functioning, which is I don’t know what a pen is, I don’t know what day of the week it is, but not like I can’t control those processes that the reptilian brain controls. Man, those are a whole different animal.

Ken Corigliano
So I spent six or seven years not being able to sleep, having anger outbursts, of course, as everyone’s probably well familiar with brain injury, TBI and PTSD and everything. Sleep was the worst, my hair started falling out, my nails weren’t growing and my eyes started to sink in my head. My face started getting realigned and all this other stuff. It was awful for that respect, and then just trying to rehabilitate my nervous system, I was just always in fight, flight or freeze mechanism all the time. I couldn’t even remember where I parked my car after five minutes of being in the building, so sometimes I had to write it down, I never remembered any password … nothing was being encoded, my brain just was not working right.

Ken Corigliano
I would go to CVS to try to find technology that would help me on any of these things that were bothering me in my life, and I met a guy who looks just like Chuck Norris, it was his double, and he knew about NuCalm. He had this sixth sense about him, he’s like, I think I know what you need, pal. He brought me over to the booth, and Jim and the guys made me skip the line, it was amazing. I sat, and for the first time in seven years I had a dream, and it was beautiful and amazing and I felt calm and relaxed. At that point, I was just sold, man.

Ken Corigliano
So I hope that answers kind of the trajectory of where … I’m an analyst, big data analyst, artificial intelligence, quantum technologies, cutting-edge stuff. I’m all over it. As a side note on my injury, I have synesthesia in a way that allows me to kind of see and taste cause and effect relationships, and I can see and taste and feel and smell data, which is really weird. So I used all those skills to help Jim and the team kind of figure out the effects of NuCalm on an elite-level athlete, heart rate variability and wattage output and all that other nerdy stuff.

Ken Corigliano
Jim, I hope that hits a little bit. I’m willing to expand or retract anything that I need-

David Poole
That’d be fine if I was Jim. Thanks, Doug.

Ken Corigliano
Aw, man, your name’s not on here. Dave, I’m sorry.

David Poole
No worries, brother.

Ken Corigliano
Your face is, like, this big.

David Poole
I believe it. Let’s talk for a minute about the crippling effects. I know a lot more about your story than you just glossed over from the injury … first of all, let’s talk about the injury at the point of origin. What happened, and why did you have the TBI?

Ken Corigliano
Oh, yeah, sorry. So I was deploying to Iraq and I was going to do this race and see my parents, and this was an Olympic qualifying event where it’d give me some points and stuff. So I was in great shape. The very first day I went out on my ride, which was just a few days before the deployment, I got hit by a vehicle, a sports car, crossing traffic at a high rate of speed, and I got hit. I kind of hit the side, I aimed for the wheel, I went into the windshield, crushed the roof, and then she hit the brakes and I flew off and hit my head.

Ken Corigliano
So I hit my head a couple times, but I didn’t really know kind of what was going on or who I was and all this other stuff. But the test they had for pre-deployment were so rudimentary that I still passed them, and so I deployed just a few weeks later. I spent six months in Iraq with that brain injury and that recovery area, which we were getting bombed every night. I didn’t realize what the problems were of rehabilitating in that environment, which were awful because I just felt like I was being attacked for the next five or six years. Even the sounds of trains would sound like the whistling sounds of missiles and mortars and stuff, so that was a big problem of the injury, was recovering in that environment with no medical care. We didn’t have doctors in the middle of a-

David Poole
Well, you had to keep it a secret, from what you told me. If they had discovered that you had this injury, you didn’t feel like you had any other options anyway. You loved the Air Force, you didn’t want to get booted from service. So I remember you told me that you had to schedule release times for peeing and pooping because you’d forget, you were incontinent, and that’s how screwed up your brain was. But you had a dirty secret that you couldn’t reveal in combat.

Ken Corigliano
Yeah, and I couldn’t read. I literally lost the ability to read words. I could do a few at a time, but looking at a piece of paper, it was just a bunch of squiggly marks. Yeah, I had to hide that big time because I really thought that they were going to take my career away. As I said before, it was all I had. They rescued me from the gutter, and there was no way I was going to let that go. I was going to serve as much as I could, as hard as I could, even if I got in trouble for forgetting things or not reading documents or regulations, which has happened often. I just didn’t care, because I was going to wear this uniform and serve in any form that I could, you know?

David Poole
So Ken, can you talk about … the huge disconnect from having a paralyzing injury like that to being one of the top analysts in the military and addressing the joint chiefs of staff and understanding data and cause and effect better than almost anyone on the planet from your condition, when did you realize you had this new superpower from the injury?

Ken Corigliano
It was just a few days after, where people were talking to me and I would, they would say any noun, I see it, I taste it, I’ll feel it sometimes, I’ll smell it. So I was just like, people are talking to me and I’m just like … because I’m seeing all these words, I’m seeing all this stuff, and the very interesting thing, I think the analysis part didn’t happen for a while, where I could see really, really complex data sets in my head in kind of a four-dimensional environment, almost like the movies … not The Matrix, but there’s another one where Tom Cruise is manipulating the data in 4D space and time. That’s kind of how I see things.

Ken Corigliano
What was happening is, and I can’t talk about most of it, but I would see little trends in data that was coming through for protecting American interests and American values and stuff, so for the information streams I would say, “Whoa, something was over here, but something’s over here and then something’s over here. Is anyone looking at all of this?” I’d string it together and literally, we were able to save a lot of lives many, many times faster than the computers could do it, just because I would be able to visualize these connections between things.

Ken Corigliano
Also, there was an empathetic part of this where I could kind of feel people, I could kind of feel their emotions a little bit. That was a very difficult thing to explain and to deal with because it’s kind of woo-woo stuff, but I could sense their heartbeat many times, where their stress level, I could feel that. Someone behind me, I could totally … it would just make my shoulders rise. So not only was I dealing with my own stressors in fight, flight or freeze mechanism, I was dealing with everybody else’s. So it just magnified the stress that was in my life; even on the phone with someone I could tell whether they’re stressed out. And I could even pick it out, like their son or their aunt or whatever, I just could feel it.

Ken Corigliano
It was so overwhelming, a lot of times I just couldn’t even get out of bed, especially with the bad sleep.

David Poole
Yeah, I bet you couldn’t sleep. That’s an unbelievable story. You still have that talent today, it’s what you’re doing right now in your service, right? You’re a systems analyst?

Ken Corigliano
Yeah. Well, I won’t say systems, but yeah, national security.

David Poole
Amazing. Let’s talk for a minute about your sports career and how you got into fitness, obviously inspired by the failure to achieve the standard minimum requirements for officers. What triggered in you, and what did you do? What was your training at the beginning?

Ken Corigliano
Yeah, so I was very fortunate as a crew chief to be very technologically inclined; we read a lot of technical data, so pressurization of the brakes and what brake lines did what. I was quite detail-oriented from that training, so when I failed the fitness test, it was very embarrassing, because the month before I was awarded a medal of heroism. Then four weeks later, they kicked me out. It was so traumatic, it was just so traumatic. So I said, okay, I can’t do this. I can’t do something, not want to do something that is necessary.

Ken Corigliano
So if I’m going to lead troops or whatever, I’ve got to love things that I hate, and I hated running, I hated it, I just hated it. And so I couldn’t even run a half a mile. So I got the videos of the world’s greatest athletes; back then it was 2001, 2002, so back then we didn’t have internet as well as we did now. But I went out, got the books, got the videos, and I watched the best runners, I watched the best cyclists, and I watched the best swimmers, and I recorded myself doing all the athletics, doing them all, and then comparing them on two screens and doing live technique modification.

Ken Corigliano
And then I got coaches, the best coaches, right, two-time Olympic developmental coach of the year was my coach. I said, okay, look, this is my goal. I don’t care to be the best, I just want to do the best that I possibly can with what I have. That’s how my athletic career started, was just doing it absolutely right from the first step and not encoding any bad habits. I didn’t know that language back then, but that was my goal.

Ken Corigliano
And I wanted to set a big goal that would push me, and I told them I wanted to have a shot at the Olympics. I don’t have to go, but I just want to be able to say that. And everybody laughed at me because I couldn’t run a half a mile, but I didn’t care. It took many years, but within 18 months I was winning triathlons. Big ones, too.

David Poole
And where were you serving at this time? [crosstalk 001516]

Ken Corigliano
Huh?

David Poole
Were you stateside or were you international?

Ken Corigliano
No, I was up in D.C. with Air Force One.

David Poole
Excellent. So can you talk today … first, before you even do that, and I apologize, can you tell us a little bit about how you earned the medal of heroism? I think that’s a pretty interesting story.

Ken Corigliano
Yeah, so it took two situations the first one, we were flying special operations troops into Afghanistan before we owned any real estate there, so we were flying from a third country in. It was very far, so one way was about eight to nine to 12 to 14 hours. That was just one way, so we had to bring these dudes in, and early on, we had to try to seize land so that we could create bases. That’s what we did. So we had dudes in the back, snake-eating badasses, who we would land at these places, no kidding, in the middle of the night, very low lunar illumination, drop these guys out of the back, and they would attempt to take the area with the assistance of some airborne paratroopers and stuff like that.

Ken Corigliano
It was a two- to three-pronged approach, where we literally land on that place and the Taliban, they couldn’t see us, but they could hear us, so they would, of course, try to shoot us, whatever. But anyway, it was a very risky mission, the plane’s got to work, right? We can’t be stuck at the place that we don’t own, so we had to fly with the planes. What happened on one trip, we had dudes under fire who were trying to take part of the airfield and we were the reinforcements, but this little device that protects the plane from missiles exploded on top of me, covered me with all this liquid fuel coolant stuff that’s hazardous.

Ken Corigliano
I had to take off all my clothes, I shoved it in the little thing and got everybody on masks and got oxygen flowing. We were able to get those guys in there to back fill the guys who were getting shot at. So I was in the hospital a couple weeks from that, so they say, that’s a great job, Ken, awesome patriotism, blah-blah-blah. Well, the next trip I fly out and the liquid oxygen starts to leak, and we land and we need oxygen to breathe, so pilot’s like, get down there and figure out what’s going on, because we may not have enough to get back if it keeps leaking.

Ken Corigliano
So I go in there, and the whole thing’s a bit snow cone, Dave. I couldn’t see shit. And I was like, oh my God, how the hell am I supposed to figure out … oxygen has an 860-to-one expansion ratio, okay, that’s why they use liquid oxygen on planes, by the way. I was just digging through it and everything, but I took a wild guess and I went in and tightened this thing, and I was like, okay, I think it’s good, man. I think it’s good. I knew a lot about the system, and I guessed from our hard landings and everything that this thing was, whatever.

Ken Corigliano
So I tightened it up and sure, it was a lucky gamble, and we made it back safe. And when we landed, because the trip is so long, they had already done the award paperwork. It took them four or five hours to do the award paperwork, so when I landed, they actually had it signed by the general, and they said, okay, man, we’ve got you nominated for a commission slot, general’s going to put you through, but you got to find a school to get accepted into.

Ken Corigliano
I had the worst grades in the planet, so for four weeks, no school would accept me. We need your school report, but I had a 2.15 GPA, and only a private school, St. Leo, they said, yeah, you’re a hero, you’re down range, okay, forget about the transcripts, so they never saw it.

David Poole
Wow.

Ken Corigliano
That’s a funny story. Yeah, there you go.

David Poole
And this whole time, you had the TBI, yes?

Ken Corigliano
No, this was way before. [crosstalk 001940] This was when I was in enlisted.

David Poole
Good. Well, let’s talk a little about your academic success. You’re very modest and very humble, you are a true American hero. You excelled academically when you took school seriously, right? Really, you’re not a dumb guy.

Ken Corigliano
Yeah, I was tired of being dumb, you know? When I was crew chief, I read every instruction manual I could get my hands on, and that’s when I won multiple awards and I knew more than some of the guys who’d been out there 10 or 15 years, just because I would read the tech data. I didn’t go come, I stayed at lunch, read it all.

Ken Corigliano
When I started my studies in school, I applied that same methodology where it’s like, I am on a mission, everyone else is drinking booze and getting laid and all this other stuff, and I was just like, no, man, this is the taxpayer dollar, I am going to return that investment to them. So I studied really, really hard and I did the cross-country and triathlon stuff, too. It was just non-stop. I got all As every single semester except for one, which was really hard, because I was a gubernatorial fellow, so I had to kind of do that stuff from a distance. I did really well, I was very fortunate to be driven.

Ken Corigliano
And then as soon as I commissioned, I went right into my master’s program. I blew that out in 18 months or so, and I got my master’s degree. And then I started my PhD, and that’s when the accident came. I couldn’t read any more books, so I stopped at that point.

David Poole
That’s amazing. I don’t have goosebumps, but I feel like I’m one big goosebump. Ken, every time we talk I’m always supremely impressed, and honestly, I can’t beat you in a race, just so you’re not insecure about that. So now let’s talk about fitness, because a lot of folks on this call and a lot of folks who are involved, are interested in NuCalm are fitness enthusiasts, and you’ve got quite the regimen and quite the way of training and adapting and staying … being the best is hard to achieve for anybody, obviously, right? There can be one winner, but staying at the top is probably even harder, because you’ve got everybody, you’re the target, right?

Ken Corigliano
Yeah.

David Poole
You’re the gold standard and you’re the person that they’re putting your picture on their wall for training and inspiration. So talk to us today about what it is you’re doing, where you’re training, where you’re competing, and what your regimen is like.

Ken Corigliano
Sure. So the first part of your question was try to relate this to the folks on the call, right? So I think it’s important that your body undergoes stress. I do believe, and I know you guys do too, that your fight, flight or freeze mechanism has to be exercised every day. It just to has to, and it will look for an excuse to do that. And that’s why people throw their cell phones, right, that they don’t work. And I believe that athletics is a fantastic way, and training and working out is a great way to systematically and precisely exercise the stress response in a controlled format for a beneficial outcome versus a destructive outcome, or an uncontrolled outcome.

Ken Corigliano
One of my main goals was using athletics to recover, and I do believe that I would be in a wheelchair, not being able to walk, if I didn’t have athelia, driven mentality and a sound training regimen, because I know folks who’ve got through what I’ve gone through, and some of them are vegetables. It’s just how you exercise that response.

Ken Corigliano
You need to have it part of your habit routine, as part your stress response physically. So the next part you asked about, being at the top of your game if you’ve never been at the top of any game, you have no idea what it takes, and you have no idea what you’re capable of. The real unleashing that NuCalm and Ignite does is gives you a key, or rather a snippet or a glimpse of what you’re capable of in a controlled environment, where you’re able to control that stress response and operate it systematically and precisely.

Ken Corigliano
At the top of one’s game they’ve mastered that, and it’s very hard, because I’ll tell you, if I eat so much as a cookie in the evening time, I know that, in the morning, I’m going to wake up 10 to 12 minutes later because I’m just going to feel like shit, well, more shittier than normal, right? And if I have an entire pizza, which I’m fully capable of doing, I’m not getting up to work out the next day. So that kind of discipline is really hard, but it takes that to be the top of the game, and you’re fully capable of doing that if you’re not completely overwhelmed with stress and compensating for the stress response and self-deprivating and all, all that other stuff that you do to yourself as kind of this unconscious punishment.

Ken Corigliano
You can’t do that at the top of the game, because people win from .5 to 2%, and if you talk about a two-hour race, that’s 1.5 minutes, two minutes, three minutes. Sometimes people are winning for a few seconds over the course of a six-hour race, and if you think of the margin of error on that, I mean, it’s insane what could go wrong. Your shoelace comes undone and you’re now not a medalist, right?

Ken Corigliano
There’s a lot of that that’s involved at the top of the game, and also, some of the most important things is systematically sequencing the stress response on certain areas of your body. You don’t follow a long workout with a speed set, and you don’t do a speed set back-to-back, you don’t tax the nervous system. Workouts are in three categories cardiovascular, which is delivery of the oxygen, right, neurological, which is delivery of the electrical system, and then muscular, which is essentially the body’s ability to push around wait or move around.

Ken Corigliano
Each of those workouts have to be divided in the muscle groups in a way that complements the stress response and gives a precise reaction from the body. What’s amazing, what I’ve discovered with NuCalm and Ignite too is you can do that mentally. Your body does not know any difference whether you do it in your head or if you do it in the real world. It is in charge of sending the reaction to those muscles of stress, whether it’s perceived or actual stress.

Ken Corigliano
So what you can do is double or triple your ability to maximize your capability by inserting NuCalm and Ignite into your regimen, and you can do this, if you’re a financial trader, you can operate this law where you can maximize your recovery after you maximize a stress response. So your body and mind, they don’t realize any difference between you doing it in your head and you doing it in real life. I have tested this, and you may remember, you may not know, but where I stopped training for six months and I did all of my workouts as planned, but I did them in my head, and then afterwards at NuCalm, or before at NuCalm.

Ken Corigliano
I wore my heart rate monitor during the mental sessions, and if a workout took me 45 minutes in real life, it took me 45 minutes in my head and I’d visualize every step. And that is gosh-darn mentally hard, I will tell you that those are way harder than the actual workouts, just sitting there visualizing each step. So the mental aspect of what the tools give you is way tremendously more important and more powerful than the physical response.

Ken Corigliano
Literally growing back neurons where I literally now can read, and I am piling two to three books a week. I’m not kidding with those numbers, with my now-ability to read, because I’ve been systemtically using these tools to pretend that I’m reading in my head, and then NuCalm, so all of myelin gets wrapped up, all the responses, all the proper responses go down, and then that six-month period where I didn’t work out, I came back, I ran for two weeks just to shake off the cobwebs, and then I gold-medaled.

Ken Corigliano
So that proved it right then and there, that the mental aspect of these tools at the elite level is totally tremendous. And I recorded all of this data and shared it to you guys, of course, and that was last year.

David Poole
I remember, I remember the conversation we had, I recorded it, and we talked about when you were testing NuCalm, you did pain sensory conditioning by doing ice-cold baths.

Ken Corigliano
Oh, yeah.

David Poole
Oxygen intake by using an oxygen vest and swimming in the ocean.

Ken Corigliano
Yep.

David Poole
You did some outrageously interesting … can you walk us through a little bit of that, your testing phenomenon for fitness?

Ken Corigliano
So as you guys should know, I tried a lot of stuff, right? And there’s all kinds of things out there, as you guys probably know, so I knew from the first bit, that first experience, it was something about this, but I had no idea. So what I found kind of accidentally is elite athletes, we do the same shit every day, man. Sometimes you just want to gouge your eyes out. But the workouts just repeat every single week, every single week.

Ken Corigliano
I know that last week I did this course under the same conditions, and I did a 17-45, right? On the bike, we have the privilege of having watts, which are pretty precise, they’re really good. What I found is the sets after a NuCalm night, my heart rate … I had to do this three times, because I didn’t believe the data because I’ve never heard of it. I knew where my heart rate would set at exactly what time during exactly what period at what wattage it was at, and my heart rate was literally 20 beats lower, but my watts were 15 to 50 watts higher.

Ken Corigliano
I’m going to tell you, my power sets on my bike are between 300 and 350 watts. If you talk about, if I’m going to do a 20-minute set, I’m probably going to hold about 280. I’m now holding 315. And that, my friends, if you remember my statement I said before where races and competition are being decided from .5 to 2%, and you’re talking about a 15% increase or a 10% increase in wattage output? That doesn’t translate to a 20% or 15% increase over the distance. That can be a really big influence over where someone was at before, just from the impact of using the NuCalm.

Ken Corigliano
I was like, holy shit. So I literally started fooling around with all the tracks, and I did a couple where I would just put them on repeat all night. I would do six, seven hours on repeat over and over again, and that’s when I really started seeing very interesting impact on oxygen uptake was very interesting, cold tolerance was also, I discovered that your fight, flight or freeze mechanism will cause your cold tolerance to dramatically decrease, and you will notice this with people who are always very anxious, they’re always cold. They get cold pretty easily because their thermo-regulation system doesn’t work as well because the body’s not allocating the resources to that.

Ken Corigliano
I knew how long I could sit in an ice bath, I did them every day. And I was like, holy cow, I can sit in this thing for two hours. I literally did. One day I sat in, I just wanted to see how long I could go. At 95 minutes, I got bored and got the hell out. I could’ve gone another half an hour. So it was very interesting to see some of the results that were happening in all these different domains, of being able to read and retain and then the heart rate and the oxygen uptake, and then my breathing in the pool. Everyone knows their breathing rate in the pool, that’s just the thing. Everyone knows that they got to either breathe out of the corner, whatever.

Ken Corigliano
Those details, I mean, if you can take one less breath per lap, that’s 1.5 seconds faster for the 100, okay? So I’m doing a mile, that’s 16 of those hundreds. So you’re talking a 1.5 over 16, you’re going to be doing that thing in 40 seconds faster or something like that, and especially if you can draw that up in a geometric format. I mean, you’re going from, say, a 22-minute mile to a 20-minute mile, and all you did is NuCalm. You didn’t even have to train more.

Ken Corigliano
So those are really very interesting results that I was finding and I was documenting for you guys, and recovery, too. Now, still, permanently, 38 seconds my heart rate can go from 170 to 124, in 38 seconds, no problem, no matter what. I mean, over and over. 20 sets, 20 rounds, and I can do that. That seems to be a permanent change, physiologically, as a result of two years on the NuCalm, absolutely. And I haven’t even talked about Ignite, man. That’s a whole different … that’s some crazy stuff. You throw the Ignite on there, I will throw 80 more watts in my session, I will pay for it, okay, and I realize that too. At a hormonal level, I will pay the Ignite, and I have to make that up at a six-to-one ratio with the NuCalm.

Ken Corigliano
But I will throw down big time with the Ignite, and I have done repeats and repeats for two years, hundreds of them, where I will do three or four or five or six one-mile repeats running, okay, and this is five 20s, five 15s, this is no messing around. Okay, on the third and the sixth, I’m going to Ignite, and it is light and day, where I’m a 5-28 and I’m a 5-10. That’s hard data. You can’t fake that on the last one, you’re gassed, man. You can’t make that stuff up.

Ken Corigliano
So very interesting data, and I hope I’m answering, I’m not going too much-

David Poole
This is extremely fascinating, Ken, I love this stuff. Can you walk us through a week in the life of your training regimen, which is equally disturbing, fascinating and inspiring?

Ken Corigliano
You sure?

David Poole
Yeah.

Ken Corigliano
All right, so we’ll start with Monday is I do three 5Ks for time with a mile or so warmup, mile or so warm-down with drills and stuff. It’s a disgusting course, okay, you don’t want anything to do with it. It’s 600 feet of climbing and everything. So I typically break 18 minutes on that, both rounds, and I’ve done those, one with Ignite, one with nothing, but anyway. So that’s Monday, and then I swim in the evening time, which is typically 700 descent, so I’ll do a 500 warmup, 700, 600, 500, 400, 300, 200, 100, bring that down and a 500 warm-down, so it gives me two miles, whatever.

Ken Corigliano
Tuesday is bike from Hell, so that’s 60 one-minute repeats with 40 seconds all-out, 20 seconds heart rate recovery. Of course, there’s warmup, warm-down with that. And then I’ll do legs and the weights in the evening time, and then Wednesday I run, that’s my speed sets, where I’ll do eight hundreds, okay, with a couple mile warmup, couple mile warm-down, whatever. And sometimes the alternating weeks, even-odds, there will be four hundreds and miles as well, and then sometimes I have 5K for time, which would probably be low 17s or whatever.

Ken Corigliano
And then Thursday is another bike from Hell with, we call it a brick, run off the bike, bike run, brick … people don’t like those, they hurt. And that is a max-wattage for 20 minutes, 25 minutes, and then 15 minutes, or we’ll do three 15-minute rounds, if it really … oh man, holding as much wattage as possible for 15 minutes straight with eight minutes’ recovery. And then that gives me an opportunity to either Ignite or switch around or whatever it is.

Ken Corigliano
And then on Friday, sometimes I recover on Friday, but I always do weights and I do ninja training, so I’ll do flagpoles and flaunches and stuff like that. If you’ve never seen flagpole, it’s kind of funny-looking, but it takes a lot of core strength. So I do a lot of core. And Saturday, you don’t want anything to do with this I go to the Appalachian mountain with a 50-pound rec bag, and it’s about a mile and a half up, about 1,500 feet or so, and I carry the 50-pound weight on my back, I run up there, and then I do two 5K for time on the top of the mountain, and then I run down with the rec bag. Yeah, I know, I see your face. Run down with the rec bag, which is a real pain in the ass at that point.

Ken Corigliano
And then I do weights, sometimes I swim on Saturday. And then Sunday is two to two and a half-hour bike ride for distance to try to hit about 50 miles, and then I do a little bit of core work. So there you go.

David Poole
And you’re doing this with your wife the whole time too, right?

Ken Corigliano
Well, until she got a bun in the oven, yeah.

David Poole
Good for you, congratulations, by the way, that’s amazing.

Ken Corigliano
Thank you.

David Poole
When you compete, how do train, how do ready for a day of competition? When do you slow down the training, the intensity, and recover and prepare?

Ken Corigliano
Oh, man. That’s an art more than a science. That’s been a hard code to crack, mainly because I’m all over the place. I race so much, but what I would do if I were to do what we call peaking, we pick a race and we decay our racing volume in favor of intensity, so we bring up the intensity but we bring down the amount of time that we’re overall training, so we would decay.

Ken Corigliano
What I would do is I would super-load the NuCalm in front of that, so 10 days out I would super-load where I would do it three times in one day, just to kind of get everything back in sync, and then maybe take that day off. And then the next day, start in on it where I would systematically end the day on NuCalm. Not so much in the mornings during that time period; that would be in the back end of it, where my volume is lower but my intensity’s way high, so I would begin my workouts in a more calm and relaxed state because I know that the session duration is less.

Ken Corigliano
I don’t know if that makes sense, so it’s kind of like a V-shape with the amount of NuCalm that we’ll be using. And then I would pepper in my Ignite, because that’s a weapon, it’s very interesting, it’s very, very powerful. So I would use that on the sessions that would replicate the race. So I race in my mind in the course; no matter what I’m doing in real life, I invent the course in my mind. I bring the audience, I bring the sounds, and sometimes I put my phone on where they’re recording me racing last year or whatever, and I put it in my pocket and I’ll play that with my buds. This is where it’s going to get really cool, okay?

Ken Corigliano
I will play that with my buds, and then I have these bone-conducting headphones from Trekz that I play the Ignite. I call it seasoning, so I season my workout in the beginning for the first three of four minutes with Ignite, and then I shut it off. And I let that resonate in my brain so that my subconscious now plays it, and then I try to recreate those frequency modulations in my head while I’m listening to me racing in my mind.

Ken Corigliano
And that does two to three things first, it creates my workout as an actuality of the day and I don’t know any different. And I crush it, okay? I just destroy the workouts. What that also does is it won’t overload me too much with the hormonal response of the Ignite, and I kind of want to be careful on that in advance. But it gives me some of the benefit, and the third part is when I do the race, I now play it in my head because I can’t not do it, because they’re wired together. So that’s what I want, is no matter where I am, I can turn that on, and then I just want it to turn on, I don’t even want to have control over it. So I just call that seasoning.

Ken Corigliano
And then the last portions of the tapering period, it’s full-on Ignite, man. I am rocking and rolling and I’m crushing it, and I know that I have the time to recover and I’m going to make sure I do the ice baths to reduce inflammation and hit the NuCalm multiple times, because I know I’m going to start and I’m going to end the day on the NuCalm so I can really plug in the Ignite and just crush it.

Ken Corigliano
I will tell you another thing too, is I did this during the financial trading, so when oil was, like, -40, I was employing the same methodology to try to get in tune with universal consciousness, whatever you want to call it. Worked really well. The same premise proved to be true, where I would NuCalm before the day starts, thankfully the markets open 930 Eastern Standard Time; people sleep on Wall Street, I guess. I’ve been up for five hours. So I’ve been using that also, and that methodology, because I don’t think that this is just a physical tool.

Ken Corigliano
These are not just physical tools, these are, you need your mental acuity, you need to be able to … if something goes down, your stock or your commodity or whatever, it’s the people who can weather the stress that ultimately come out in the end, don’t sell a loss. I just wanted to addend that at the back end there, Dave.

David Poole
I like that, thanks for the stock tip. So Ken, obviously the races aren’t in your backyard, how do you account for travel and acclimating to the environment and all that?

Ken Corigliano
Using NuCalm has been incredible. It’s actually one of the most amazing benefits that I’ve noticed. Not only with the, I don’t care about colds or anything like that anymore, I don’t give a shit, right. These guys, I don’t know if you know, but I swam Alcatraz last year, and I did half the course without a wetsuit, okay? They require a wetsuit when you start, but I went back and I did as much of the course without a wetsuit, and that’s 52 degrees. So I don’t care about that.

Ken Corigliano
One thing is very interesting is I don’t give one shit about jet lag. I don’t believe in it anymore, I don’t need it, I don’t care about it, and so on that plane, I NuCalm and I fire and forget, man. And that has been a serious advantage, because a lot of times races are starting … I got to be there 545 in the morning, and I just flew in at midnight, and I got to find a hotel and all this other gobbledygook. That in itself is stressful. Not only would someone be lacking the sleep, but they’re stressed about it, and so it just compound the whole thing.

Ken Corigliano
I’m sliding in, man, I don’t give a shit, I got to sleep in the trunk of the car, which I’ve done, and I won the race the next day, by the way. I don’t care about how much time I need to sleep, I know that I’m going to wake and I’m going to feel good. And I have tested this multiple, multiple times over many races and had just crushed it.

Ken Corigliano
So I hope that answers your question. And also, doing races at altitude, I don’t care about altitude anymore. It doesn’t even affect me because my oxygen uptake is so well, all I need is … I don’t even need it, but if I can get one night sleeping there, because … you probably know this, but when you got to altitude, your diaphragm is not used to pulling in that air pressure. You’re at 14.7 pounds per square inch, I believe, at sea level, if I remember my data right.

Ken Corigliano
You go up 12 and even 13 and a half, you can’t suck it in, your diaphragm’s too weak. You’re a weakling. So when you go up to altitude, 5,000, 6,000, 9,000, I did a nine and 10,000-foot races. I don’t even care anymore because my diaphragm has been stretched and strengthened so much due to the quality of sleep and the oxygen density that’s in my blood because I’m sleeping so well. I don’t even give a shit about altitude anymore.

Ken Corigliano
That has been really, really cool, because people are really stressed about some of these races that are up there, it’s snowing on them, it’s 9,000 feet in Utah, and I’m just chilling. Just great out there. So I hope that hits …

David Poole
[crosstalk 004653] What about your nutrition, Ken? What’s your diet generally like in your civilian life, and then pre-race and all that stuff?

Ken Corigliano
Yeah, I’m thankful to be alive and I understand the fragility of life, and I just can’t stomach putting garbage in this amazing thing that we’ve been given that just doesn’t … there’s no equal in the universe that we know of. Especially on this planet, there’s no equal. So I really don’t do artificial stuff, I do not do artificial preservatives, colors, especially colors, and I don’t do anything that’s not humanely treated, because I do believe that that genetic code is affected by the treatment of that animal and all that stuff.

Ken Corigliano
So my diet is pretty clean, and I definitely don’t do anything from a cow. I believe that there’s a lot of bad stuff that, you know, whatever. What I’ve noticed is that my palate is incredibly good now, because dairy has this stuff called whey in it, and whey blocks the taste receptors in your mouth, a lot of them. That’s why companies put whey in their food, because the artificial preservatives that they have in there actually curdle in your mouth, and they put whey to block your taste receptors from tasting the curdling that’s in your mouth.

Ken Corigliano
So my nutrition is lots of greens, I have salad every single day, I focus a lot of vegetables, I have reduced the amount of sugar that’s in my life and in my uptake, and I attempt to reduce all added sugars, which is incredibly hard in America. So I don’t do anything that I don’t need. But a lot of vegetables, particularly a lot of vegetables, and then I do some high-quality meats, depending on where they’re from and all that stuff.

David Poole
You’re saving us from the bad guys, you’re eating responsibly, you’re winning races, you’re a father and a husband. When do you take a moment off? What’s your R&R look like? That wasn’t a trick question, Ken.

Ken Corigliano
I meditate; those are some of the best moments in my life, because I relive some of the best moments of my life, and then I invent the best moments of my life that have yet to come, and I create them. So I love it, and what I really love, and man, that new track, oh my God. [crosstalk 004943] I call it my nuke. I used to call NuCalm my time machine, because I’d just be like, oh my God. It felt like four minutes, but I’ve been out for forever.

Ken Corigliano
That has helped me kind of get in touch with me, so I give a lot of gratitude during my meditative sets, and I just thank that I’m alive and I just say, look, you know, if it’s to be, let it be me. If not me, who, if not now, when? I say those kind of things, and those are my moments. And then a lot of my workouts are, I just go out there and I just want to fall in love with what I’m doing right now. I had to do that last night. I went out to the reservoir and I got in a kayak and I just put my arms in the water and I just felt the water in my hands and the birds and just truly just revered this nature that we’ve been given and this world and this existence that we’ve been given. I reconnect with our Creator in that way.

David Poole
Can you talk a little about how proud you are of your wife and her … now you’re not training with her, but every we talk about a race, like, yeah, I crushed it, I won, but oh my God, my wife got a personal record and she destroyed the competition. Share some of her successes with us, I’m always really impressed.

Ken Corigliano
Yeah, and I know that we’re approaching on time, so I want to do two things my wife’s from Ohio, and she is the most critical, non-believing human being I’ve been with, and it’s great because it really forces me to proof’s in the pudding kind of stuff. And the first day she used NuCalm, she was like, I have never experienced this, anything in my life, and this is the greatest thing, this is awesome.

Ken Corigliano
So I know that if she believes in something, it’s the sealed deal. She used it through pregnancy with my son, we literally played it through the belly, okay, we got special headphones, all that stuff. And I am willing to bet that my son is maybe the only person in the world that has listened to NuCalm every day of his life, I don’t think anyone else can say that. So he’s super-smart.

Ken Corigliano
But my wife has used it, she beats me in triathlons and in races, she won multiple triathlons while five months pregnant, by the way, and actually ran a 5K on her due date. So, yeah, beat that. It’s legit, okay, everything is solid about it, and she uses it systematically even now.

Ken Corigliano
We actually, I called Jim, who’s not on the phone right now, I called him when we were having some problems recently, and this is a personal story for me, but we had to run her to the hospital, very concerning situation, and it was a stress response from something, we don’t know what it was, but she turned the NuCalm on and literally, that was the cure. It relaxed her, it stopped the contractions, and stopped the potential fatality in our family from happening.

David Poole
Wow.

Ken Corigliano
It’s great stuff. So she uses it … oh, and by the way, she’s a schoolteacher for kindergarten, and she plays it in the class to chill the kids out, and she has the number-one class in the county. She’s a brand-new teacher, by the way, she just got hired, okay? And they’re like, whoa, we’ve got to see what Rachel’s doing over here, because her kids are scoring all the highest, they’re the calmest and she’s got these outstanding kids, and she truly believes it’s the magic of music and her playing the NuCalm strategically in the class.

Ken Corigliano
And she was a caretaker on the Air Force base last year and the year before, and she could get four screaming kids all asleep at the same time on the ground, she’d put the music on the kids were just … Anyone who has four or five kids from four different families, okay, that’s tough, getting them to sleep all at the same time. That just doesn’t happen. But she executed it every single time.

Ken Corigliano
That was a bunch of different examples there, but my son is incredible and I really believe that NuCalm had a total role or a lion’s role on his ability … he’s three, he has memorized over 40 books verbatim. He can’t read, okay. Three-year-olds don’t read. He has memorized them all by the pages, we can pick a page out and he can say what’s happening on the page.

Ken Corigliano
My wife is a teacher, okay, so elementary school. Her kids in the elementary school can’t do that, and he’s doing math and multiplication now at three. So his ability to grasp data and encode it, I believe, has been increased by using NuCalm in that developmental period. If you know, there’s priming going on and trimming, priming and all that other stuff happening in the neurons right now. If I can convince that process to either slow or be more efficient, I do believe that we can have pretty incredibly humans on this planet as a result.

Ken Corigliano
There you go. I know that was more than …

David Poole
Sounds like you and Rachel are breeding a super-race.

Ken Corigliano
That’s the goal, man.

David Poole
Don’t stop at two, man. We need a lot more of that.

Ken Corigliano
Yeah, our next son, oh man, now we’re way smarter now, too, so it’s going to be pretty awesome, I think.

David Poole
So Ken, what’s your next big accomplishment besides being a new dad?

Ken Corigliano
I don’t know. I don’t know yet. 2020 has really … I was going to win three world championships, so that would’ve been my answer four months ago, but I don’t know yet. I think just coming out of here being more in tune with the universe, so I’m using NuCalm and Ignite to get in tune with the universal consciousness at this point. I just want to be more in flow, you know? I think that is just-

David Poole
Lofty goal, yeah. Hey, Ken, how many pull-ups can you do?

Ken Corigliano
40? I don’t know. Yeah.

David Poole
All right. Well, I accept your forfeit. We were supposed to race yesterday and you never showed up, so I’m 1 and 0.

Ken Corigliano
Yeah, okay.

David Poole
All right.

 

Can Stress Impact Your Body’s Growth & Performance?

“Air Force Ken” Corigliano joins This Is NuCalm to share his incredible journey from a life-threatening injury to serving for our country.

Despite his brain-damaging accident, he stayed strong and completed feats such as qualifying for the Olympics, becoming a Major in the Air Force and serving in Iraq.

 

“I believe that athletics is a fantastic way and training and working out is a great way to systematically and precisely exercise the stress response in a controlled format for a beneficial outcome versus a destructive outcome or an uncontrolled outcome.” — Ken Corigliano

 

 

Ken Corigliano credits NuCalm for helping him through times of recovery. He recalls having his first dream in seven years after one session!

 

“I sat, and for the first time in seven years I had a dream, and it was beautiful and amazing and I felt calm and relaxed. At that point, I was just sold, man.”

– Ken Corigliano

 

Don’t miss this inspiring discussion on overcoming incredible odds during a journey towards optimal performance.

 

Ken lives a life of service to others and has over 20 years of wearing the service member’s uniform, loving nearly every minute of it. He brings the joy of being alive and being human to the people of the world. Ken has generated and influenced many things you enjoy today, without expectation of return.

Many companies and organizations seek out his advice. He has owned trademarks, copyrights, and patents many times while knowing that Ideas are never original and are always a result of life influences.

To find out more about Ken Corigliano, visit his website.

 

 

Melodic or Magnetic? The Best of Purposeful Music and Why it Works with Dan Selene

On his way to living to be over 120 years old, Dan Selene joins this episode of This Is NuCalm to talk in-depth about longevity and the power behind music. Working as a sound engineer, Selene shares his process behind creating soundscapes for NuCalm and Ignite!

Tune in to find out why the NuCalm soundscapes work and why as well as Dan’s personal long-life optimization program.

 

“Whenever you hear nature sounds, those nature sounds come from 3D holophonic microphones that we had back in the record company days and we recorded a series of nature sounds from exotic locales like Sedona Arizona in a vortex night to get those crickets.”

— Dan Selene

 

Listen to This Is NuCalm on Apple & Spotify!

 

Dan Selene of SoundTonics® began his career as an educator, taught at the Krishnamurti School, and co-founded Higher Octave Music. Dan’s mission is to create audio programs, sound environments, and music to inspire everyone to attain their highest level of performance.

 



Key Takeaways

[1:00] David welcomes Dan Selene, the wonderful sound engineer for NuCalm, and asks him how he came to be where he is today, from teaching in Ashrams in India to entrepreneurship and healing sound engineering.

 

[7:50] Dan speaks to the emotional moment he discovered the healing power of music and the miraculous series of moments that changed his life trajectory and brought him to purposeful music.

 

[12:50] Dan meets NuCalm for the first time and finds that deepest place within, the one he’d only reached a few times with TM.

 

[14:10] A musical program is purposeful and by design, Dan shares part of the process and why he builds music to be magnetic, not melodic as well as the equipment and frequencies that he works with.

 

[21:28] Dan talks about the difference between the NuCalm, Ignite, and Tony Robbins’ NLB work.

 

[23:43] The difference between NuCalm sound and off-the-shelf sounds.

 

[25:06] Dan recommends tracks for specific issues: getting to sleep, Deep Recovery is knocking David out, why?

 

[30:21] Working with ancient instruments is something that Dan has been doing for a long time, he shares how special those can be in terms of frequencies.

 

[31:28] Dan explains how he cured himself of an auto-immune disorder in his thirties which launched his personal longevity project, he shares his program and tools with listeners.

 

[36:36] Dan shares what he listens to when he’s not listening to purposeful music.

 

[38:00] Q1: Do you practice TM or only NuCalm?

 

[39:09] Q2: Can you tell us about the sleep tracks?

 

[41:00] Q3: Will new sounds be added soon?

 

[41:48] Q4: Tracks are massive, can you elaborate on the size of the tracks?

 

[42:49] Q5: Is there a difference between NuCalm and binaural beats?

 

[45:00] Q6: How do you translate physics into sounds?

 

[45:54] Q7: Should we repeat the music daily or change up tracks?

 

[46:42] Q8: I’ve not found a good track to relax this week, any tips?

 

[51:43] Q9: I wake up as soon as I hear the track is over?

 

[54:05] Q10: My mind wanders through the whole session, what should I do?

 

[55:21] Q11: What does Theta state feel like?

 

[58:04] Q12: I use deep recovery for sleep, what track do you recommend?

 

[58:39] David Thanks Dan for sharing all of his experience before signing off until next episode.

 

Continue on your journey and until next time, breathe deep, relax, and keep looking forward.

 

Mentioned in this episode

NuCalm

Jiddu Krishnamurti

Eckhart Tolle

SoundTonics

 

This is NuCalm, the show for those looking to improve sleep quality, manage stress, and boost recovery. Brought to you by Solace Lifesciences, the makers of NuCalm, the world’s only patented and proven neuroscience technology that works within minutes, without drugs, every time! In over one million medical sessions, NuCalm has helped men and women around the world.

 

NuCalm: stress relief for the way we live today, technology to help you disconnect.


Full Transcript

David Poole
It gives me great pleasure to introduce Dan Selene. Dan is an amazing human being. He’s been unbelievably beneficial to us with NuCalm, and I appreciate his talents every single day, because before Dan we had access to four tracks, I was addicted to one. I’ve got my own peculiar OCDs. And now, I mean, Dan’s part of my life every day, I want to do a NuCalm. So tonight we’re going to talk openly about Dan’s passion, Dan’s drive. Another thing that’s interesting about Dan is he’s on a quest to live to be over 120 and I think it’s a layup for him to get there.

David Poole
You can see him on the screen here. He’s a little bit older than I am and he’s in much better shape, so I like his chances. But let’s get started, Dan with your journey through life. What pivots, turns, surprises and walk us through how you got here today.

Dan Selene
Well, thank you for inviting me first of all, and hope I could be helpful to the Mastermind Group. The things we’re going to talk about tonight are things that I have hardly ever think about, which is the past. So I really had to apply myself a little bit and even after I talked to David this afternoon, a few more things came into my mind and I’m thinking, “Oh my God, I totally had forgotten about that and that was such an amazing experience.” But you could say that my journey with music really started 37 years ago, and I have now been doing it for half my life. So I was a late bloomer and I didn’t really find my purpose until a specific day happened in 1984.

Dan Selene
Before that, during my 20s, I always had a bit of a discontent because I grew up in the Midwest and I had a very normal life where I went to college, I became a school teacher. I really enjoyed that, but I knew that that was not my purpose, but I didn’t know what my purpose was. So I started reading books, I just knew that there was something more that existed. So, at a certain point, when I really realized that I wasn’t going to fit in, and this is after about six years of teaching, which I really enjoyed, but then I realized I needed to do something different.

Dan Selene
So as usual, when things got to… before you could make a break through, there’s usually a break down and that’s what happened. And so I basically took off and traveled around the world. I spent two years in my 20s traveling around the world on one trip, which was about over a year. I had a 20 pound pack and it was as late as could be and I took a motorcycle from Amsterdam down to Athens, and I went across Asia over to India. And I was always looking for the purpose in life basically. And I kept all this advice as I was going across Asia.

Dan Selene
And I’d do things like be up all night long on a train in Pakistan, miserable. And it was like I didn’t mind it at all, it was just something I knew I was just going through it. I mean, I was actually very happy, it was a very freeing experience, not to be mowed down by comforts that didn’t even matter to me. And as many people before me, including The Beatles and so many people, I ended up in Rishikesh in Northern India, and I had my own first awakening there. And basically it was that there’s nobody outside of oneself that’s going to give us the answers, that everything’s inside.

Dan Selene
And that directly relates to the programs I’m doing today with NuCalm, which I call in my mind that the inner journey series, really. So I had that experience and I came back after a year. Actually, I think after having just an amazing life in India for three months, I never got sick one day. Then on the last day, when I went into the Nepal, I came down with hepatitis and I was like seven days, I think, into a track and it was one of those things where I could have died there and somehow came through and I remember thinking I was ready to go, if that was it, that was it.

Dan Selene
But I came back and I found one philosopher that I really appreciated, a guy named J. Krishnamurti, who had a similar message to Eckhart Tolle. And I came the first in the first group of teachers at a school he had an Ojai. And it was like an ashram type of a school and we got $500 a month plus room and board. And it was a phenomenal experience and he would come and be there three months a year, we’d have dinner together and things like that. So I did that and then I realized there was a certain point when you get into your 30s as a male, it’s like, “Wait a second.” You start to think about, you do want to get the material question handled.

Dan Selene
And so I thought that something arose in me that, “Okay, I did that.” And it was the highlight of my teaching career, it was my 10th year, I thought I was ready to do something else. So I set off on my next journey, which was to be an entrepreneur and my method was I would get all the sound tools and programs that they had at the time and study those basically. And there were things like what we’re doing now, and it’s very infancy back then, that was in like the late ’70s, early ’80s. So I did that for a period of time, I left the teaching role and it’s very challenging to go from being a teacher to an entrepreneur.

Dan Selene
So I spent four years of pretty intense struggle, it was also great at the same time, but it was kind of a struggle. And then I get to a point where things got very, very difficult and it was almost… in the ’80s we had a big recession, it was almost like now, except I was the only one that was really as affected as I was, which was very disheartening. So I was in that situation and it lasted quite a while and then I got to a point where it became totally intolerable to do any kind of work that was just to get by. I mean, things I didn’t want to be doing, like trying to sell things to people or just things that weren’t in my heart.

Dan Selene
So at one point I just let everything go and I said, “No matter what happens, I’m just not going to do this anymore.” And I just left everything. And that was in 1984, and I went on a trip up to Northern California to Mill Valley and I went to a yoga class, I think it was, and there was a sign there that said, “Expect a miracle,” from of course, the miracles I believe. And I remember saying to myself, because I was really almost like a nervous breakdown type of a thing, where it’s like I really had a difficult period. And I just remember saying to myself, “That’s what I need, is a miracle.”

Dan Selene
And that very afternoon, I went to a used record store in Mill Valley, which was a famous store at the time. And I picked up a couple of albums and one was by Kitaro, what I remember, who was a new age artist in the early ’80s like that. And when I played that music, something shifted inside and I felt like I was plugged into a universal energy. And I had no experience in music before that, I mean, I loved it, but I never would have dreamed I would be doing anything with it. And even when I heard that, I just was enthralled for myself and it was so healing that it was something I just couldn’t take off.

Dan Selene
I would be listening to one album for days. And at the time I lived in Santa Barbara, when I got back to Santa Barbara, I was walking along the beach and listening to the music. And the next thing you know, I met a guy who had a radio program on and it was one of the first new age radio programs on in the country. And he was at the Santa Barbara College, I think. And so we became friends because I was so into the music and he was like an expert. And then in a few months, his wife inherited enough money to buy two houses in Montecito. And so we took 10% and that became the financing for the first thing, which was going to be a syndicated radio program. It was such a miracle, it was amazing.

Dan Selene
Also, when I got back from that trip, I got a call one morning at about eight o’clock in the morning, no one ever called at eight o’clock. And it was a person I used to be the teacher of her kids in Ojai and she said basically, “I’ll pay you whatever you need to live on, if you could help me do such and such.” And she had this project she wanted me to do. And it was the answer to my dreams. It was such a respite from the regular world of how people live that I just felt like I was in an exalted place. And then in six months I met my partner who started the record company, he started the record company, but he was much more experienced in business and had been a management agent in Los Angeles and so forth.

Dan Selene
So that was the origin story of how we started Higher Octave Music, that company. And what’s amazing is that that lasted for 20 years of my life, that experience. And that’s very rare for a record company. And then after the 20 years, then my next step was to be, and I used to say, it’s purposeful music. That’s what I wanted to do. And again, the whole 20 years, I was also listening to every sound tool I could. I was avidly working on things, I would make my own programs, make my own music and all that.

Dan Selene
So then I thought I was prepared to do that after that time. Then after that, I studied another four years studying NLP, hypnotherapy and various other techniques, alternative techniques that I wanted to combine with the music and make these master programs. And my goal was to have a program that someone, no matter how much they needed help, they just put on their headphones and they’d get a relief from that program. And like a glimpse of a real life, which is more of an inspiring scenario, how life really is, which is there’s more than what meets the eye. And there’s more to life than what most people are experiencing.

Dan Selene
So after that four year period, I decided… Oh, then 2008 came and that was another one of those disruptive moments. When your world is destabilized, that’s part of the hero’s journey. It always starts with your world being destabilized and at that time I thought, “I need to do some things now,” because I was in my ’60s, I think. “I want to do some things now that who knows what the world’s going to be like?” That I just want to make sure I get those in. And one of them was, I loved to ski. So I moved here just outside of Park City to ski at Deer Valley and I spent five years doing a ski sabbatical.

Dan Selene
And during that five years, I was out in nature four to six hours a day, every season, because my soul was craving that at the time, just to be in nature. And during that time I made a thousand programs that I still have on my computer today with various types of music and that’s where I come up with the first thing I did with NuCalm, it was one of those programs that I got the idea for the music in those early days. So that was five years more there and a skied about 8,000 miles downhill, I had a GPS with me all the time. And I just loved it.

Dan Selene
I did that because I wanted to do something that I loved so much that I could transition into my third career. I did 10 years as a teacher, 20 years in the record company. I thought, ” I’m going to do 30 years at my next thing and that’s going to be based on what I love to do the most.” Which was doing the purposeful music. So I just kept moving in that direction and then in 2016, when I met Jim and I heard NuCalm for the first time, it was like another moment of… and I told him, I think this is a calling, and that got us to here.

David Poole
Amazing. So walk me through your first experience with NuCalm and how you knew it was one of those special moments for you.

Dan Selene
When I traveled to India, I really was into meditating. And one time I did TM, I did that every day for five years, morning and evening. I loved it, I still love it. But I didn’t keep it up during that part of my life, and so the first day I did NuCalm, I did it in the morning and it was one thing. And then in the evening it was confirmed to me that, that is that place, that deepest place that I had been to, that’s what I was experiencing. I just said, “This is for me. I love it.” I think I’ve done it every day since.

David Poole
Yeah. And you’ve got a very exhaustive habit, NuCalm we appreciate that. So, well, walk us through, Dan everyone on this call and myself including Erica, we’re very curious. I mean, we can’t hear the physics, you can’t hear the algorithm. We listened to the music schematics you build, can you walk us through how you design a track, how you find inspiration? What a program is like?

Dan Selene
Yeah. I think one thing I wanted everyone to know is that what we do, it’s not masking sounds. We’re not masking the science per se. What I’m working on is actually enhancing the science so that the experience is even deeper if possible and we’re always working on improving that. And one of the things is that the music is not melodic, but it’s magnetic. It has to be magnetic not melodic, because if it’s melodic, your mind can get caught in certain loops or certain memories, or brings up certain emotions, and that’s not what we want. It’s more to be clear. So we work on making the music magnetic so that people can still be totally engaged with it until they go into that, maybe they go into the other state. But it doesn’t hook you like a melody hooks one.

Dan Selene
The second thing is that we combined acoustic and electronic instruments, and ancient and futuristic instruments. And we really looked for sounds that people haven’t heard before. And if anyone’s been listening to Deep Recovery, just an example, just in the second three minutes segment, there’s just some resonances and vibrations that are quite unusual. And then in the next section, there’s a Tibetan singing bowl that really carries that segment of that track. Then there’s eight segments altogether, it’s kind of going through this certain journey. And that’s part of keeping it magnetic without having a really strong melody any place, it really hooks you.

Dan Selene
Third is, whatever you hear in nature sounds, those nature sounds come from a 3D holophonic microphone that we had back in the record company days. And we recorded a series of nature sounds from exotic locales, not necessarily exotic, but Sedona, Arizona, like Vortex night to get those crickets, the Big Sur in the morning for the ocean and birds. And we wanted to get really an amazing healing stream, and so we found a stream at a monastery in Japan. One of our producers was there. And so the monks there put the rocks in certain places, so the stream had a certain resonance.

Dan Selene
So those are the types of environments that we put in. And we mix those in sometimes with some of the music. And just as a thing people might not know, but when you hear birds, that’s a signal to the unconscious mind that everything is safe because as hunter and gatherers our brains were always looking for danger. And that was one of the signals that things were clear in nature as the birds are singing.

Dan Selene
And then besides that, the fourth thing we’d do is we put in some universal healing frequencies, and two of them are, really the two now we’re using are, solfeggio of 528, which I’ll describe in a second and a 432 tuning. And both of those really are Dr. Holloway’s recommendations. Even more he really wanted those. And so that was part of what we wanted to do and he said that would really enhance the underlying science.

Dan Selene
So the solfeggio tone, that’s like a note and you can hear that in all of the recovery tracks, all three of them. In the first track, you can pick up that note at the very beginning, actually that’s something people can meditate on and you can just stay focused on that note and it goes to the very end. A lot of times you won’t recognize it, because other things are going on, but it’s there all the way through. And if you really listen, you can hear it. And it’s the very first sound and the last sound. So you know what that sounds like.

Dan Selene
But really the reason it’s there is that tone has been recognized as something that allows the body to relax and heal. It’s called the miracle tone. And there was a study in 2018, when was it? Yeah, 2018 in Japan that said that people could start to release stress within about five minutes with that tone. So there’s studies on it as well, but it’s generally recognized. And you can see for yourself, you can feel that.

Dan Selene
In the second recovery track, the first 15 minutes does not have that tone, but it starts after that in the meditation portion. And then in the third recovery track, it’s actually in the instruments, we have either a vocal or a flute or a violin playing that tone. And it also is the first thing you hear when the track starts and the last thing when the track is over. So that’s one way to actually experience that and not just read about it or hear about it, but feel it for yourself every day or whenever you want to.

Dan Selene
Then the 432 it’s a frequency, that everything is attuned to that frequency. All the 200 albums I did with Higher Octave, the standard frequency is 440, that everything is tuned at. But the 432 has some special properties that are linked to nature and linked to the mathematics of the universe and sacred geometry. So how you can experience that as with the power nap two, and with the new deep recovery track. And so you can see for yourself what that feels like. So with those aspects, those are all built to help accentuate the science and support everything that Dr. Holloway is doing.

David Poole
That’s amazing. Dan it might be nice to, maybe we can catalog some of these things are indicators. I didn’t realize there were a couple of yawns embedded in power nap one until you told me, now I can’t not hear them, right? Like a Where’s Waldo thing. Very interesting. So, how do you come up with these phenomenon, you and your team, what do you-

Dan Selene
First, I’m really into the science myself and often I start listening just to that and seeing what starts to come into my mind. And then I’ve also, of all the years of experience of listening to everything else that’s out there, probably I’m connecting dots from everything I’ve ever done. But there seems to be a vision that comes just even doing other NuCalm sessions. Something comes in that bubbles up that this feels like this would be the right thing for this particular track. And it’s not something you can’t really make happen, it’s got to come to you and it always does. It’s very interesting how that works. The ideas start to flow and then we just start, we work on different sounds that would fit with that and the track just starts to be developed.

David Poole
What about your work with Ignite? Because those are two polar opposite kind of phenomenon. So sometimes when you’re searching for a NuCalm tune and does Ignite kind of pop into your heads like uh, oh.

Dan Selene
Two different things, but I love the Ignite tracks. I mean, I’ve listened to those avidly, the ones we have now, and I’ve got several that we’re putting together. And for the gym and for my skiing and my mountain biking and things like that, I love the Ignite tracks. That was the first thing I did with Jim was to make them an Ignite track. That was one of the tests that I went through when we got started.

David Poole
How’d you like working with Tony’s NLP stuff when we got that catalog?

Dan Selene
The hardest project I’ve done would be the Tony Robbins project with the Golden State Warriors, I think it was, well, both of them. Where in each of those I did 10 straight days, day and night and I loved it because I learned so much, I started to absorb all of the principles and the lessons. So it was phenomenal. And so it wasn’t something that was played all the way through. I picked out the key moments and then put them to the music, because one of the things that happens when you’re reprogramming yourself or transforming your state of mind and so forth is that if you could connect the emotion with the words, that’s when it really goes in and means something.

Dan Selene
And Tony would be the first to say that, then he’s like incantations. And so it’s beyond affirmations, it’s like you really put your energy into it. And so I matched his key words and key teachings with that emotional feeling. And that’s what people can feel when they’re listening to that. And I think I listened to that, I mean, for probably 30, I mean, 30, 50 times, I don’t know, I’ve listened to it so many times from the time I started music, I first did it, and then myself, I used it in the gym and it was phenomenal.

David Poole
Can we talk for a minute about, there’s hundreds, maybe thousands of vinyl beat apps out there, there’s meditation apps. What’s the difference, because we’ve been trying to explain it for years. It used to be a really exciting subject matter for us now it’s really raw and I’m fatigued by it. But how would you best summarize the difference between just getting something off the shelf, listening to natural sounds, White Noise versus what you get with NuCalm?

Dan Selene
Well, the reason I was excited most practically about NuCalm was that I could do the soundtracks, because that’s what I wanted to hear, because I’ve been avidly working with these types of things for years, and they all have their value. I think they all have a value to somebody, people are in different stages of their journey. But for myself, I never heard or felt anything as powerful as when I did the first NuCalm session. And that’s before we had the discs, that was really a different level practically, but it was phenomenal. And I could be listening to anything every day, I’m always looking for great music and great things to get inspired by.

Dan Selene
But I love to spend my time with NuCalm. I try to do one session and try to do one session in the morning, usually just as I’m getting up. A 50-minute session and then a power nap in the afternoon, as a minimum and often another session in the early evening. I’ve never really felt anything else that compares.

David Poole
You want to talk for a minute, we get a lot of these questions all the time. I know Erica does on the front lines a lot, can we talk through some of the algorithms that might make sense for different people at different times. So say I’ve got sleeping issues, very common phenomenon and a big request for us. What track would you recommend for someone who’s trying to go to sleep and stay asleep through the night? So this is a primer to get them into that sleep state. What would you choose?

Dan Selene
Well, I think that usually what’s been recommended that I’ve read from other people is that they don’t use the NuCalm 2.0 at night, which would be the relaxing recovery tracks, because it could keep you up. I’ve not found that myself because I do those sometimes without the disc for sleep, because then they don’t put you into that other state, but they’re still very relaxing and have a certain energy for that. And actually any of those could work for that only because we just finished it, I’ve really been working a lot with the Deep Recovery track these past few weeks. And I’ve found that very powerful for that time and also for the morning.

Dan Selene
As part of what I do now, I work very late because that’s when the energies flows for musicians and I work with other musicians. And so, starting my time, 1000 maybe till midnight or one o’clock, that’s normal for me. And so when I get up in the morning sometimes it’s just, I’m not quite ready. And so I put on the Deep Recovery or one of the other recovery tracks, and that’s a great way to start the day. If I haven’t had a really deep sleep or didn’t have a chance to have the sleep, as long as I wanted to. I would say that maybe you wouldn’t want to do the power naps then because they would be a little, maybe a little disruptive to the sleep.

Dan Selene
But I haven’t had any problem myself with the 2.0, but I’m such an avid user that I wouldn’t necessarily recommend that to somebody else. It’s just my experience. But I would say any of those, Deep Recovery is working for everything for me right now.

David Poole
When do you use the power nap tracks, Dan?

Dan Selene
Late afternoon. I love them for late afternoon. Sometimes if I don’t have time in the morning for a longer track, I would do it in the morning as well. I think it’s very good to maintain that morning in between feel. So you don’t jump into the day with email and with getting back to life as it was, you buy a little space when you have either the power nap or the 2.0, because remember the 2.0 you don’t need to, or the recovery tracks, those can be shorter. Those can be a half hour, you don’t need to have them be the full 15 minutes unless you need that. So I find the nap anytime 20 minutes, anytime I can get that in, I would do that.

David Poole
What’s so new and special about the Deep Recovery? I can’t speak for Erica, but it feels like I’m in a fight with Mike Tyson and get knocked out in the first round. I mean, it’s really potent for me, and I’ve been doing NuCalm for many years.

Dan Selene
Yeah. It could be that your nervous system needs more rest. I mean, it could be that it’s signaling that that’s something that you could let it play out, do it a couple of hours at some point, and just see what that feels like.

David Poole
Interesting.

Dan Selene
One of the reasons it’s so deep is because that was the first one we did during this quarantine, this COVID-19 period. And we were home for, whatever that period of time was. We started it before, but when we finished it, we really did a lot of work on it was during that time. And I just felt like I needed to go deeper, just in light of all that was going on, I just wanted to go as deep as possible. And I think that that’s what was going on there.

Dan Selene
Also, I had that in mind for a sleep program, we were working on which we’re going to be doing in the future. And while I was working on that, I thought, it’s interesting, we’re going to do this and people are going to fall asleep in 15 minutes regardless. And as you can tell, it’s very detailed all the way through every minute. And while I was doing it, I was thinking, “Boy, this is amazing. It just keeps going like this like it needs more and more.” And then at the end I realized it wasn’t supposed to be for sleep, it was supposed to be for that deep recovery.

Dan Selene
And I think that that’s why it became that way. It’s very powerful, but I find it very… because I’ve done it so much, I’ve kind of gone through the stages where I need more rest with that one. And so I come out of it and feel really great.

David Poole
We just got some feedback from someone from the FBI Hostage Rescue Team, and he’d done a 14-hour shift and he did deep recovery for over six hours.

Dan Selene
That’s what I’m saying.

David Poole
Pretty interesting feedback about that recovery side.

Dan Selene
Maybe that’s also the 432 Hertz is in there. The whole thing is too, 432 it’s a good experience for people to know that, that’s part of it. And then part of it is there’s eight segments and it brings you through different, almost different chambers or it goes through different spaces and it is different than any of the tracks we’ve done before actually in that way then it’s so pronounced. So it’s a real journey all the way through. So really you could listen to it a long time because it doesn’t get old because there’s so many different things that are going on, even though a lot of people won’t even recognize that because they’re just in an altered state very quickly, but over time, you’ll see that there’s really a lot there.

David Poole
How do you research and find ancient instruments? You talked about using ancient and kind of futuristic.

Dan Selene
Well, the ancient, it’s just things like the Tanpura, various Indian instruments, things like the sitar. I don’t know if that’s ancient, but the thing with it, in the sitar, there’s, I think 30 strings that aren’t even played, they’re just resonances. And so that’s what we like is when we have those resonances, because that also amplifies the science underneath. And so it’s just something we’ve collected over years and that it could be tuning forks could be anything like that.

Dan Selene
And for the futuristic type sounds, we are always looking for just different sounds. And there are several and Deep Recovery as an example. The idea is we want sounds that people haven’t heard before. And so it’s something that is novel for the novel where they’re going to be feeling as they get into the deeper states, more relaxed states.

David Poole
Let’s shift gears for a moment and just talk about your longevity project. What’s your recipe for optimal health? In fact you’re skiing, let’s say 800 miles a season?

Dan Selene
In five years I did 8,000 miles, but I’ve shifted gears a little bit. What happened to me was at a certain point, I ended up getting my first ever real serious health problem and I had an autoimmune disorder. And it was one of those things where there’s no cure for it, they say you just have to live with it, and make the best of it or whatever. Spondylitis was a back thing and it’s in the genes and all that. So when I heard that, I thought, “Wow, what does that mean?” And so after doing my own research, I realized that the antidote was exercise and I’ve always been into exercise, noticed by the skiing and so forth, but I wasn’t an avid gym goer or anything like that. I was always wanting to be outside.

Dan Selene
However, after that I changed my diet. I took all the classes at the National Association of Sports Medicine, became a personal trainer for myself, also a corrective exercise specialist, senior fitness specialist, nutrition specialist, all the classes that they have. And I applied those to myself and I did that with programs as well. Where I would have words to myself about visualizing myself being in perfect health and having total great posture in my 80s and this whole thing, I had a whole visualization that I put together and basically worked on that. That was I think in 2012. And I actually built myself into better health than I’ve ever had been in my life.

Dan Selene
I stopped doing gluten, so gluten causes inflammation. And so I wanted to get rid of all the inflammation. I started doing what’s called cryotherapy, which you experienced when you were here. And that’s where you go into this chamber with nitrogen, I think it is. And it goes down to about 300 degrees, but it’s not really cold as funny as that is, it’s cold but it’s not cold like being out when it’s 20 below in Minnesota. And so I did that about, I don’t know, over 500 times, over three years. I was doing five days a week of that.

Dan Selene
So that, NuCalm, the right diet and the exercise. Even in my house, I keep a gym in my house downstairs. I’m in movement all during the day. I believe the body needs to be moving, I’ve got an inversion table, so I’m hanging upside down, mini trampoline, so you get the lymph nodes, the lymphs clearing out. Infrared sauna, things like that, tools to have around that are easy to access. And if you don’t have that, just being outdoors and walking, but somehow keeping the body in motion all the time.

Dan Selene
And I really treat my body like a temple. I totally treat it the best I can and to me it’s all fun and interesting. It’s fascinating to see what can be done and try to get better every day and have good habits.

David Poole
What’s your sleep like, how many hours of sleep do you try and get a night?

Dan Selene
I try to get seven and then do NuCalm, the last one to one and a half in the morning. That seems to be ideal. And the sleep is great. It hasn’t always been great. I’d say NuCalm has helped tremendously, I definitely had an issue during part of the time in the last 10 years, but now it’s excellent.

David Poole
So you said that your first job was, first crew is 10 years, your second was 20s, then mid 30s, so that’s four years ago. So you have 26 more years. So how many more tracks are you going to create in 26 years?

Dan Selene
I intend to create as much of a catalog as I can create. That’s my goal for as long as I’m alive, basically. I’d like them to get better and better, deeper and deeper, and try all different kinds of music. As you know, I’m doing not just the meditative music, but the music for Ignite as well. And we’re going to get some outside tracks with license, but also we’re doing some. And that’s such a full spectrum of things to be doing. That’s what makes me probably the happiest is being totally immersed because you’re in the flow in doing that and there’s nothing that compares to that.

Dan Selene
And in the flow like that, you’re also receiving all this inspiration from whatever the sources are, the news that comes in and it’s extremely gratifying and there’s nothing more enjoyable than doing a NuCalm session and having ideas come in and think, “Wow, I’m working right now.” It’s the greatest.

David Poole
Excellent. Let’s do a little bit of exercise here, what do you listen to if you’re not listening to the programs you’ve created? Who’s your favorite pop artist?

Dan Selene
I don’t really look at it that way. What I’ve been really enjoying recently, it’s I go on YouTube and I look for great live performances. And I try to find performances that give me the chills, that I just want to listen to over and over again. And just recently I was listening to, I watched the documentary on Coachella and I saw that there was a Prince performance of the Radiohead song Creep. So I looked that up and that was also aligned and that’s an example of, wow, it was just phenomenal. And it could be any kind of music just across the board, I’ve listened to a lot.

Dan Selene
Even sounds strange, but Folsom Prison Blues by Johnny Cash from that album, there was something about that live album that is it’s just a statement. There’s something that’s there where you just feel that even though you think it’s as far ways, you can think of it in the kind of music I like. But it can be that it can be any of the… I like all the great classic and not so much pop, but the rock artists. So I like music across the board, but I really focus on this stuff we’re doing because that’s my favorite of all.

David Poole
Excellent. Well, let’s move toward some questions here, Dan. So we can get you back to work, because I know your day job starts in a couple hours. Question from Philip, do you still practice TM or NuCalm only?

Dan Selene
Right now, I’m doing NuCalm only, but I still know my mantra. I still appreciate that system. It was a great place to start. But now I love the, I put the headphones on, and also keep in mind I’m working on new things all the time. And so it’s very exciting for me to try new things. And so basically that covers maybe two hours a day of NuCalm, or various aspects of NuCalm. So I don’t really have the time, but I totally respect and appreciate TM definitely. I got a lot out of it, did it for five years, as I said, every day.

David Poole
Did you ever try and use your mantra during an early stage NuCalm?

Dan Selene
That’s a great question because I had never even thought about it, but no, I haven’t. Now I just go, I’m so used to it and it goes very deep, very fast. My whole meditation practice has just taken it to another level. And that’s all I do now with that.

David Poole
Question from Mitch, can you tell us about the sleep tracks, they sound awesome? And tell you Mitch, I was with Dan, Jim and I were out at Dan’s place in January when he first tried trying the new physics, and it’s not new. We’ve had that for 10 years. We move very slowly. And we don’t share anything with anybody and Dan didn’t even know we had it and then he did it and it was a mind bender. But you can give a little sneak preview, the team you have and the people you have on today are mastermind people that are always going to have first access to our new tech, especially in a testing phase.

Dan Selene
Well, you’re going to love it because I remember when I used it the first night and then they came back, then Jim and David came back the next day, I was so inspired that actually that was the inspiration for the deep recovery track originally, before I realized that it really wasn’t for that. So I’ve got plenty of other things for that. But what happens so consistently is after 15 minutes, it goes off and I’m the kind of person where I would play it all night long, but it’s not for all night long, it’s only for going to sleep.

Dan Selene
And so you have to be sure it’s not on auto repeat it, because then it’s really too much. Then you do get groggy if you got it all on which I did all night long all and it didn’t work that well only because of that. But if I wake up in the middle of the night for anything, I put it back on and after about 15 minutes, the next thing you know it’s morning. So I am so excited about that and that’s actually on the agenda for after Ignite next year. And I’ll be working on it until then actually, that’s the great part. I’ve plenty of time and it’s just I’m very excited about everything with that science and that’s really props to Dr. Hollo way, did a brilliant job on that.

David Poole
No. I used it for my son for years and I never thought about it for the consumer. Question from Leslie, will new tracks be added to the lineup soon? I can answer that. Dan is about to embark on a sprint, to put together some unbelievable tracks over the next 10 weeks based on new tech, you can talk a little about the advances if you want, or if you’re just keeping trade secrets, it’s up to you Dan.

Dan Selene
Only the fact that I’m planning on going into a zone really starting about tomorrow because I’ve got things lined up and they’re going to be doing a lot of 432 tracks, and I’m really excited about it. I’ve gotten a lot of new gear, new sounds. I want to have things again that are totally fresh, people haven’t heard before and we’re going to be on it. It’s going to be total immersion for me for a couple of months.

David Poole
A question from Anthony, curious about complexity and size of tracks. I’ve heard a number of times the team discussed the size of tracks being massive 700 megabytes. Yet all tracks download and take up only one gigabyte of space combined, that works out to blah, blah, blah. Can you kindly elaborate on the size of the tracks?

Dan Selene
Well, originally they were in that 700 range because we were using wave files and we were making them that intense. But now we’re doing ACCs and we’re doing some other styles because that was taking up a little bit too much space. But the tracks might have 30 or 40 layers, sometimes more, so that’s part of it.

David Poole
Yeah, Anthony. That was a business decision that I was forced to make a while ago. We had four tracks originally, so four gigabytes is not too invasive as the catalog advanced, 12 gigabyte just for the tracks alone was a little obnoxious for us. So we had to move to a compression algorithm. Alison asked, can you please explain again, what is the difference between NuCalm program and binaural beats?

Dan Selene
There are binaural beats within the NuCalm program, you can’t hear them because they’re under the surface. And Dr. Holloway, I think he’s been on the group, hasn’t he? And he talked about that.

David Poole
Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yep.

Dan Selene
So you don’t hear them because we have the music over those, but they’re there and we actually wrap those and other types of sounds that he thinks would accentuate those and make those even more powerful. So the NuCalm tracks have that built in.

David Poole
And I can expand on a little bit, Tom, Alison. Binaural beats, it goes back to the invention story with Dr. Holloway. If there was something off the shelf, he would have used it, remember, he was trying to resolve acute stress for people suffering from PTSD and addiction. The highest form of anxiety you can have. And binaural beats are interesting and they’re in a native design. The brain develops a tolerance for them very quickly. Your brain has special powers and its primary job is to keep you alive. And it needs to be aware of your environment to do that. So it loves being tricked for moments and it’ll happen. So Dr. Holloway invented the non-linear oscillatory algorithm. It’s delivered in a binaural beat kind of wrapper, but it’s a much more sophisticated.

David Poole
So nonlinear means there’s no pattern to it and the oscillatory piece means we’re always changing it. So that’s what keeps that… and Dan can speak to this, I’ve done NuCalm twice a day for over 10 years now, I’ve never been able to beat it. I have different sessions a lot, this afternoon, I did one for 20 minutes. I just need to read, but I worked it at 400 in the morning and got up early and I was on phone calls all day and it was just kind of coming unglued. And then instead of going for a motorcycle ride, which I probably, I love motorcycle rides are my meditation. I signed NuCalm for about eight or nine minutes I was like… and then I will go 40 minutes later. I mean, it took me for a loop like it always does.

Dan Selene
Yeah. Me too.

David Poole
Got a question from Chi, how you translate we have a non-linear dynamic algorithm pattern into a music track, as in how you visualize and make the music. So the question is, the underlying physics, Dan, how do you take that? Because you say you listened to it and it gives you inspiration and you just try to kind of follow the belief system in that algorithm. How does that work for you?

Dan Selene
Well, I just know where it’s going. And so that’s part of the thing, that was more the early days, but now that I know where we’re going, the destination every time. And so that’s what I start to think about, is what’s most interesting or deepest way we can get to that destination, which is that deep theta state where you go into the autonomic nervous system.

David Poole
Excellent. Got a question from Joloweng, forgive me if I’m not pronouncing your name correctly. Would it be best to repeat the music daily or change the track to get into a deeper relaxation?

Dan Selene
Well, I think it’s good to have some variety. I think if you haven’t tried different things just to try and see what they’re like, that can have a different effect just because of what the music is, but you’ll still go to the same deep place. But usually what happens is people are on one track for a while and then they like that, so they keep on going with that. Because they can be like a signal and they just go with the signal. But if you can try different ones, I think that a variety will make it even more interesting.

David Poole
Excellent. Got a question from Martin. Any tips for getting more out of NuCalm, so far despite daily, he says nuclear, but I know he means NuCalm sessions, Martin, I can see you. In the past few weeks, no track has managed to switch off my mind or get me to a meditative state. My mind still focuses on whatever stressful thought is on my mind.

Dan Selene
And I just like to know, what happens? What is the experience?

David Poole
Martin, you can speak to Dan directly, I just unmuted your line.

Martin
Yeah. I mean, for me, although it’s pleasurable listening to NuCalm, I’m not feeling any of the experiences that you keep talking about. I’m still just very conscious, my mind is still, whatever racing thoughts is going through my mind or whatever problems in the day. So far I’m not getting it and I’m doing at least two hours a day, because I know that I need to. I’ve had some very stressful experiences and I’m using this to help me, but so far I’m just not getting it. I mean, I might as well just be listening to the radio.

Dan Selene
And how long has it been?

Martin
Three weeks I’ve been doing this.

Dan Selene
Three weeks and you’re talking even Deep Recovery you’ve done?

Martin
Yes.

Dan Selene
And you haven’t had a feeling from that, that releases you from your thinking?

Martin
No, absolutely not.

Dan Selene
And what time of the day do you do that?

Martin
I’m mainly doing a session in the morning when I first wake up. I mean, my sleep is disturbed anyway, so that’s another problem. So I use it, I usually do one of the recovery tracks recovery 2 or 3 first thing in the morning. And then I’m using the deep recovery in the afternoon between 200 and 400.

David Poole
So Martin, I can take this one, Dan. I’m very curious, here’s what we do know and everybody’s got their own mental capabilities. There’s something called locus of control and locus of control is your ability to really defend yourself and it doesn’t matter size, gender. But I can promise you after 13,000 subjects of NuCalm and a lot of feedback, we had a lot of people like, “Yeah. It doesn’t work.” Looking at the biomarkers, the ones we care about, HRV, galvanic skin response, QEG and with a 32 CZ markers on your brain, you’re getting into parasympathetic nervous system dominance. Most of our brains don’t shut up, mine just goes into kind of a dream state.

David Poole
There’s definitely times where I can focus for a few minutes longer than I want to. I want it to take me away. But the net outcome of you achieving parasympathetic nervous system dominance and homeostasis never doesn’t work, not one time in 13,000 subjects. So it really doesn’t matter about the actual psychological experience is almost irrelevant. I can promise you, if you’re borrowing a lab and hook you up with the markers, you’re no different than every other subject. And these are subjects with very extreme cases. And we were doing people with six years of reported insomnia, very diseased. So we’ll get you on with Dr. Holloway. We’ll give you some tips and techniques to quiet the monkey mind but keep on doing it too.

Martin
Yeah. I’m just trying to find out how long it would take, because I’ll say by now I would be… I’m just hoping that soon it’ll start to clicking and I’m very committed to the program. I’m not questioning the program in any way.

David Poole
No, no, I totally get that. Trust me-

Martin
For me, it’s just not working.

David Poole
10 years ago was I’m like, “Holy shit, NuCalm doesn’t work. Oh my God, it didn’t work with Martin.” And we were always like that, because we did that. We’d go to your house, Martin, we’d NuCalm and we get your feedback. We say, “Hey, what’d you think?” And you’d be like… Like, “Oh no. Oh dear.” Then it was our friends at Harvard and NASA who started looking at the data and say, “There’s something really interesting here guys. There’s something really… Doesn’t matter the context or the disease state, we can have someone coming on crystal meth and boom they’re in that parasympathetic state in three minutes, like everybody else.”

David Poole
So do know this Martin, and we work with very challenging cases. You’re getting benefit, so that investment you’re putting in, and I can tell you’re committed. Most people would stop after two sessions, like, “It doesn’t work,” and trashed it. Three weeks, twice a day is a rich investment. So keep it up, but we can take it offline and we’ll figure it out. And then we’ll share that with a group, your success story or you’ll disappear quietly in the night and I won’t tell anybody what happened.

Martin
No, it’s gotta be a success story. I am totally committed to this. I want to be one of the best cases that you’ve got. I’ve got a history that needs sorting out. I’m confident in the success.

David Poole
We dig it, we dig it. It’s those cases that are more curious to us than anybody. So that’s why when I talked to Blake, I’ll say, “Okay, great. Let me get Martin’s contact information, I’ve got questions.”

Dan Selene
I would say one more thing is that is you just don’t ever give it up. Don’t give up on it, that’s the main thing. And I’m positive it’s going to come through.

Martin
Yeah. Thank you.

David Poole
Got a question from [inaudible 005515], I’m a newbie to NuCalm just about two weeks, [inaudible 005518] if I lose conscious and as to my guess I fall asleep, but I wake up as soon as they hear the track is over. What do you suggest to then get myself out of bed? I get so relaxed and it’s easier to fall back to sleep. I typically do it at 400 or 500 AM.

Dan Selene
400 or 500 AM. And what purpose do you want? You want to-

David Poole
[inaudible 005544].

Kirsten
Hi.

Dan Selene
Hi.

Kirsten
I’ll get a better light, I just got off the bike. So I’m doing it because I’m definitely not getting a lot of sleep at night, maybe five hours of sleep a night. I’m doing it for recovery, so I’ll wake up at like four o’clock in the morning and do 50 minutes. [crosstalk 005609] I have dirty sleep, I think because of bad mattress and whatever and so I’m trying to get myself that extra sleep.

Dan Selene
What time do you actually want to get up then?

Kirsten
500 AM out of bed.

Dan Selene
You get up at 500.

Kirsten
But I’m up at 400 to do the track.

Dan Selene
I see. You do what, the relax or recovery tracks at four o’clock?

Kirsten
I do a deep recovery or something like that.

Dan Selene
And you only have one hour?

Kirsten
Yeah.

Dan Selene
Okay. I was going to say, because otherwise putting that together with the nap is fantastic because the nap brings you up even more at the end. But that’s 70 minutes, if you can do 70 minutes, I would do Deep Recovery into either of the two power naps.

Kirsten
Okay. Yeah. I love the power naps in the afternoon. They’re awesome.

Dan Selene
Do them as well. But you can do the Deep Recovery, it’s 432 and the power nap too is 432. So those two could go nicely together in the morning, and then do the other power nap in the afternoon.

Kirsten
But I don’t understand, how do I program my phone that way to do one and then the other?

Dan Selene
Do you have a iPhone?

Kirsten
Yeah.

Dan Selene
Put it on iTunes, make a playlist. Wait a second, is it iTunes?

David Poole
No. It’s all after it. And so all you’re doing is to select those tracks and they’re playing in a loop.

Kirsten
In a loop. Okay. And I’ll put the timer on 70 minutes.

Dan Selene
70 minutes. Yeah.

Kirsten
Awesome. Thank you. That’s great. Thank you.

David Poole
Question from Philip, my mind does wander almost the whole session. Do you recommend just letting it continue or center it somehow?

Dan Selene
I think try to center it would be feeding into that. I would just let it go and just go with the music. I try to make the music like a journey and so you could let go into that, especially with thinking deep recovery. I wouldn’t try to do anything. I would just let it go if at all possible.

David Poole
Yeah, I agree. I used to go into NuCalm with an intent and sometimes I’d get frustrated I couldn’t accomplish anything. And now it’s just an escape, I just hit the pause button on life and say, “Hey, this moment kind of sucks. Do I have time to do NuCalm?” I go do it. I don’t try and solve the problems I’m having, I don’t anticipate solving the problems. Just go, get away. And I’m going to get back, I’m usually pretty relaxed and it doesn’t seem so overwhelming to me. And my imagination is incredible, I have the craziest dreams on NuCalm, it’s spectacular. My subconscious is very… I don’t know. [inaudible 005904] it’s mine, I can’t compare to somebody else’s but it’s rich with content.

David Poole
Myrna has the question. What does it feel like to be in theta state? I’m on my third week and I’m not sure if entering theta state. I stack a 50 minute and a power nap, first thing in the morning, most days.

Dan Selene
So what was the question, how does it feel to be in the theta state?

David Poole
Yes.

Dan Selene
The theta is the deep recovery state, that’s where… I know that I have almost like a little click that goes in my mind, I can feel it when I go there. Usually you start to breathe slower, that’s one of the first things that happens, at least that’s how I feel. And then that’s kind of where the mind is really slowing down. And actually the first 15 minutes on a lot of the tracks, that’s kind of getting you there and it kinda meets your mind where it is and then it kind of takes you on this journey, deeper, deeper, deeper, but then after about 15 minutes, you’re kind of there in that state. And what does it feel like? It’s the mind is quiet and it just feels like you’re just breathing and you’re just there.

David Poole
Excellent. Anthony has a question, heard you say sometimes you use without the disc. Can you elaborate on with and without?

Dan Selene
Well, that’s only, someone asked about before going to sleep or using it late at night. That’s only for that. It’s not really a NuCalm session without the disk, but if you’re doing something where you don’t want the full session and you just want something like that relaxing in the background, that’s where it could be used without that. Otherwise, you want the disc for the full effect.

David Poole
I see a comment from Kirsten, “It’s definitely like a good joint. LOL.” I can actually expand on that, it’s legal in Massachusetts. It’s okay to talk about this. But here’s something interesting, if you want to get a more profound experience from a substance, you do NuCalm first because you can balance the autonomic nervous system. You’re going to get a greater yield of anything you take, I don’t care if it’s ibuprofen or marijuana. And we work with a lot of our athletes and a lot of them have habits that are off label habits and that’s how I felt and I say, “Listen you don’t have to smoke 10 hits, you can smoke two and get the exact same effect.

David Poole
And by the way, when you mess up your schedule and you’ve got practice and you’re a little bit unwell, do NuCalm again, it will stabilize and bring you back to kind of your full conscious state. So it’s a nice partner in crime, if you will. A question from Myrna or a comment, “I love the rain stick kind of sound, I think it’s in the Deep Recovery track.”

Dan Selene
The rain stick is actually in the power nap two.

David Poole
Excellent. And Roseanne, “I usually do a NuCalm between 200 and 400 PM deep recovery. I’m using it for better sleep. If I can only do it after 500 PM on a day, what track would you recommend?

Dan Selene
If you can only do it after 500 PM?

David Poole
Yeah.

Dan Selene
Perhaps one of the relaxed tracks after 500 PM. Relax one and relax two.

David Poole
Can you speak for a moment, Dan, about the moment you and Jim had around [Maliva 010236]?

Dan Selene
I mean, that he was using it back in the [crosstalk 010243].

David Poole
And you asked him, “Hey Jim, what kind of music do you like?” And he’s like, “Oh, I’ve been using this guitar track for my girls to put them to sleep at night for about 10 years. It’s not Maliva, and your response was?

Dan Selene
Well, that was our record that we put that out in 1990, basically. And so that was one of the connections that we had.

David Poole
That was a really cool moment. Jim, couldn’t wait to hang up and call me and say, “Holy shit.” And find out Maliva, we think we can get the licensing.

Dan Selene
Yeah.

David Poole
Good.

David Poole
That was fantastic. Well, that’s it my friend. It’s time to get back to work. What time is it? It’s 906, that was a good solid hour. I really appreciate you, Dan, as a friend, [inaudible 010328], your drive, [inaudible 010331] your talent, your groundedness is very cool. People are already recognizing that you’re in great shape too.

Dan Selene
Thanks a lot. I really wish the best-

David Poole
[crosstalk 010342] come to your place. I’ll beat you in a pull-up contest next time.

Dan Selene
Yeah. And I just wish the best to everybody on their NuCalm journey, the Mastermind Group. I hope you’re with us for a long time.

David Poole
Cheers everybody. Thank you.

Dan Selene
Thank you.

 

Can Nature Sounds Affect Your Well-Being?

Dan Selene is on his way to living to over 120 years old! He joins This Is NuCalm to talk about his own process for longevity as well as his work as a purposeful music engineer.

Dan Selene of SoundTonics® began his career as an educator. He taught at the Krishnamurti School, and co-founded Higher Octave Music.

 

“Whenever you hear nature sounds, those nature sounds come from 3D holophonic microphones that we had back in the record company days and we recorded a series of nature sounds from exotic locales like Sedona Arizona in a vortex night to get those crickets.”

— Dan Selene

 

Dan’s mission is to create audio programs, sound environments, and music to inspire everyone to attain their highest level of performance.

 

“When you hear birds, that’s a signal to the unconscious mind that everything is safe.”

— Dan Selene

 

Tune in to this episode of This Is NuCalm find out more about how the power of sound can relieve you of stress, improve your sleep and boost recovery.

 

Dan Selene Co-Founder of Higher Octave Music

Dan Selene is an entrepreneur with a lifelong commitment to learning and is an innovator in the music industry. He began his career as an educator in the Minneapolis school system. In the mid-70’s, he traveled to India where he was introduced to the teachings of J. Krishnamurti and his ideas of transformation through self-knowledge.

In the late 70’s Dan taught at the Krishnamurti school in Southern California, a mecca for world-class authors, scientists, and thinkers.

In the mid-1980’s, Dan co-founded Higher Octave Music, an independent record label focusing on Ambient and Progressive Instrumental Music. The label generated over 200 albums in 20 years and was acquired by Virgin Records.

His passion for music and his background as an educator led him to develop a new world of audio products. Dan’s mission now is to create personal development audio programs, sound environments, and music, to inspire everyone to attain their highest level of performance and achieve a way of life, both spiritual and material, that brings benefit to all.

Dan Selene has a Master of Business Administration from Pepperdine University.

Finding The Right Posture For Health With Dr. Michael Robinson

Today’s guest is a true expert in the field of stress and a career-long dentist!

Dr. Michael Robinson comes on the show to share how he’s used NuCalm to drastically change his personal life and practice.

Dr. Robinson also shares some serious tips on better breathing, posture, and bite in optimal health as well as how to cope with stress as a small business owner.

 

“People get a diagnosis of ADD or ADHD and really what they need is a good night’s sleep! And they need to get good air. Many times I’m disappointed when I see that doctors have put these kids on some medicines. Every drug has side effects and I would rather them have no drugs at all. The best is our natural air.”

— Dr. Michael Robinson

 

Listen to This Is NuCalm on Apple & Spotify!

 

Dr. Robinson is a physician of the full mouth. He informs patients about what they can do to reach optimal form and function, whether that includes physiologic or cosmetic dentistry. Dr. Robinson’s commitment to education with unique patient care supports his belief that people want more than just a nice smile. They want to feel better as well. They want to feel younger, healthy, and more confident knowing that their dental team is on their side.

You can find out more about Dr. Michael Robinson on his website.



Key Takeaways

[1:00] David welcomes Dr. Michael Robinson and invites him to explain how he came into dentistry and what eventually led him to become a stress management expert.

 

[4:06] Mother Nature gets it right when we’re born, Dr. Robinson speaks to what happens to our bodies when our environment exercises pressures on us.

 

[9:00] Breathing is key for Dr. Michael; he shares some interesting facts about nose breathing and the calming chemical it releases — LSD everybody!

 

[15:30] The biting on pencils example! Dr. Michael talks about face shapes and the unconscious postures we may take that are detrimental to performance as well as the work an LVI dentist can do to help correct these.

 

[21:27] Dr. Robinson the stress expert shares how he sees stress manifest in patients and how he makes a point to ask them how they are — he also makes a point to talk about how NuCalm has helped his practice tremendously.

 

[25:00] Though he looks like he has it all together now, Dr. Robinson really didn’t, he opens up about how NuCalm has changed his personal life.

 

[28:38] How has NuCalm made Dr. Robinson’s dental practice better and easier? From helping with hangovers to travel, Dr. Robinson shares his more creative uses of the device!

 

[31:28] Audience questions start pouring in with Q1: is there a device recommended to keep sleeping mouths closed instead of tape?

 

[33:20] Q2: What is Dr. Robinson’s take on nasal septum straightening?

 

[33:30] Q3: Dr. Robinson shares the kind of tape he uses.

 

[36:47] Q4: What does Dr. Robinson recommend for people who have Ramsay-Hunt syndrome and does he use sleep orthopedics?

 

[38:33] Q5: What should people do about having a mouth full of mercury fillings?

 

[41:00] Dr. Robinson shares his thoughts on the future of dentistry.

 

[42:30] Q5: What is your favorite time of day to NuCalm?

 

[43:55] Q6: On Dr. Jerry Tennant and the book Jaws: The Hidden Epidemic.

 

[48:08] Q7: Will dental fillings be replaced with something else soon?

 

[49:47] Q8: What is Dr. Robinson’s recommended at-home oral care routine?

 

[50:35] Q9: How to find the right dentist and does bite affect posture?

 

[52:52] Q10: Don’t the adenoids and tonsils serve a purpose? Why remove them?

 

[54:33] David thanks Dr. Robinson for his wonderful insight and signs off until next episode.

 

Continue on your journey and until next time, breathe deep, relax, and keep looking forward.

 

Mentioned in this episode

Patrick McKeown

LVI

Dr. Jerry Tennant

 

Close Your Mouth: Buteyko Clinic Handbook for Perfect Health, by Patrick McKeown

The Oxygen Advantage: The Simple, Scientifically Proven Breathing Techniques to Help You Become Healthier, Slimmer, Faster, and Fitter, by Patrick McKeown

Jaws: The Story of a Hidden Epidemic, by Paul R. Ehrlich and Sandra Kahn

This is NuCalm, the show for those looking to improve sleep quality, manage stress, and boost recovery. Brought to you by Solace Lifesciences, the makers of NuCalm, the world’s only patented and proven neuroscience technology that works within minutes, without drugs, every time! In over one million medical sessions, NuCalm has helped men and women around the world.

 

NuCalm: stress relief for the way we live today, technology to help you disconnect.


Full Transcript

 

David Poole
Tonight we’ve got a true expert in the field of stress, although that’s not what his degree says. That’s not what he signed up for, but he is a career-long dentist. He does some exceptional different types of dentistry, which I think we’ll get into tonight. I’m going to find very interesting. His name is Dr. Michael Robinson. He’s up in Ontario, Canada. We’ve known Michael for well over five years.

David Poole
Tonight with Dr. Robinson, I want to focus on the stress of being a small business owner, the stress of working on patients who may or may not be struggling to cope with the treatment they’re getting or expect to get, and then now a little bit about the stress of being a small business owner and not being able to operate his business, and then also really focus on what he does, how they do it, some of the excellence in care they provide, and then his own personal journey with NuCalm, both as a personal user and with his patients.

David Poole
I think we’ll share some pretty cool anecdotes about how he’s been able to provide an exceptionally positive experience with people who otherwise really struggled with the concept of dental care. As everyone knows on this call, we’ve had a long history in the dental business over 10 years. With that, welcome to the evening call tonight, Dr. Robinson. Why don’t we get started with tell us a little bit about your background and how you got into dentistry as a chosen field?

Dr. Michael Robinson
I shall do. Well, thank you for having me on this chat. Nice to see all these beautiful faces from around your country. I don’t know if any Canadians are part of that group, but doesn’t matter. I love America. It’s where I tend to go to train. So speaking of dentistry, I’ve been a practicing general practice dentist for 32, 33 years now and enjoy it very much. It’s a business that you can do that definitely touches a lot of people’s lives, provides a good income when you can work.

Dr. Michael Robinson
But my focus in dentistry has really changed in the last probably eight to 10 years with my introduction to LVI, which David already made mention of. Dentistry’s an interesting business. We work in a very personal, close space with people, so I have an opportunity to feel a lot of energy out of people. You can appreciate that going to a dentist isn’t necessarily the happiest thing for most people to do, but realize that it’s a necessary thing.

Dr. Michael Robinson
My focus with dentistry has changed a lot from just coming out of dental school we are well-trained in a very small area. I call us very good molar mechanics at the time of graduating. We tend to focus on that. We have very poor business skills when we come out of dental school, so that can add an element of stress. That’s been part of my journey to learn that. NuCalm has helped that definitely in the last little while. But coming out of school with a focus that’s very minute, which is teeth, is okay.

Dr. Michael Robinson
But the training that I’m now doing is focusing more on the whole body and the connection of the body to the teeth and the body to your posture and your bite to your posture. So another way of looking at that is to think that Mother Nature … This is going to sound kind of strange. But Mother Nature gets it right when we’re born. We’re all born quite beautiful. I’m looking at my daughter. She’s one of those. But what happens over time is that all Mother Nature can do is react to its environment. That’s the way our body goes.

Dr. Michael Robinson
So our environment is changing a lot. I personally don’t think that we respect this enough. For example, the basics of life are eat well, sleep well, exercise well, and be spiritually connected to something. Be communicative. These kind of things, our society, we tend to break down on these. So I’m at the practitioner end of this equation, and I get to see the ill effects of us not respecting what Mother Nature really wants us to do, so whether it’s poor oral hygiene, that’s pretty simple to deal with.

Dr. Michael Robinson
That’s why I have a well-trained hygiene team. But more importantly is what’s been fun for me is the stresses that we put on the body, such as not eating properly and the body reacts to that, not breathing properly, the body reacts to that. I can chat a little bit more if someone’s interested in learning about this breathing because when Mother Nature reacts to a poor environment, then we actually have a breakdown in the system. So in the mouth, our gums break down.

Dr. Michael Robinson

With what I’m really interested now is when we don’t breathe properly and we open our mouth and [inaudible 00:05:28] because of allergy issues. We can’t breathe through our nose. We drop our tongue, and then the whole craniofacial skeleton collapses. You’ll probably find it quite interesting that there’s a lot of people nowadays … If you look at the number of kids that require orthodontic care, I’m 60 years old. I may not look like it. I know. Thank you. But it’s shocking the number of kids that have small, crowded faces.

Dr. Michael Robinson
That’s just because Mother Nature has reacted to a poor environment. When the children are allergic to something, milk tends to be one of the major things. Our diets aren’t as good. The foods that we eat are highly processed, so the body reacts by swelling, like adenoids and tonsils swell. So little Johnny going to bed has to open his mouth, and the face collapses. And then the whole dental complex breaks down. And then when the dental complex or the facial skeletal complex breaks down, then the jaw retrudes.

Dr. Michael Robinson
So that leads to these symptoms, what you people have probably heard about TMJ problems, TMD, very serious stresses on the body and very complicated, fun, but complicated to treat. My training through LVI allows me to treat that. But what’s really, I think, our duty in life is just, in mine I take it quite passionately now at my office with my whole team, is that we want to work with young mothers to make sure that they’re doing the right thing, and fathers, young parents, make sure that the children are respecting what Mother Nature needs, good diet, a diverse diet, good breathing, good exercise.

Dr. Michael Robinson
And then the social stuff, I’ll let other people get into that. This is what’s been really fun about dentistry for me now. I’m a 60-year-old guy who’s probably been way more passionate about my career choice now in the last number of years because I really cannot become a … I’ve grown out of the more mechanic phase of life. I’m now sort of a physician of the mouth. I was chatting with someone yesterday and said, “How is dentistry different?” Well, it’s funny. From the moment a patient walks in the room now, I don’t just look at teeth.

Dr. Michael Robinson
I actually look at the way they walk into the room and know that I can have an effect on them by talking about those things that we just talked about, sleeping, breathing, eating properly, exercise and that. And then I can get to the mouth and I’ll have a better idea. I’ll see things broken down because Mother Nature has broken things down in the mouth. And then I can help bring them back together again. So that’s been the biggest change in dentistry and makes it fun for me in the rest of my career.

Dr. Michael Robinson
It’d be nice if our government and the whole world gets healthy again and gets this whole damn virus thing figured out, that we can get back to work. But even this virus itself gets us thinking about doing the right thing because right now Mother Nature has thrown a curve ball at it. I’m not totally pleased with the reaction of where we’re going with it, but I do believe that all kinds of good’s going to come out of this. We’re going to start realizing that we need to respect sleep, health, diet.

Dr. Michael Robinson
We definitely need to be doing this for our elders as well because they’re the ones that are the most affected by this, and we’re not looking out for them well enough, in my opinion. So I know that good’s going to come out of this, and then I’ll eventually be able to get back to work and start fixing up some people.

David Poole
So Michael, can you talk for a minute about the breathing. When you mentioned that, that makes me very curious. I mean a lot of people probably on this call even in the biohacking community are into Wim Hof and understand how valuable breathing can be and even try breathing exercise. But what are you talking about specifically? What are you looking for, and how do you make adjustments?

Dr. Michael Robinson
Oh good. Well, I don’t think there couldn’t be a better time for us to be focusing on breathing than right now. This virus that’s out there is an airborne droplet problem. We breathe, and that’s why everyone’s wearing masks and respecting distances. Breathing is a gift that our body has. You can get air a couple ways. You can either breathe it in through your nose or get it in through your mouth. Most people don’t realize that the nose is, by far, the best way to get air because the design of the nose is such that you warm your air.

Dr. Michael Robinson
You filter the air. You moisten the air. Most people understand that. But most importantly, breathing in through your nose produces a chemical in your paranasal sinuses called nitric oxide. That drug that our body produces for free is an amazing chemical because it has all kinds of things. Well, first off, you guys are all NuCalm users. Nitric Oxide has parasympathetic abilities. So it is a calming drug for our body. It has antiviral … That’s a big thing in our world right now, isn’t it?

Dr. Michael Robinson
It has antibacterial qualities. It has vasodilation, which means opening the blood vessels which is good for the heart, good for calming as well. So breathing is a big deal. If we can’t use our nose, then we open our mouth. Things that I can do when I have a patient come in is just look at their face. You can often tell someone who’s not a nasal breather. They have a small narrow nose or nares, that’s the openings. That’s classic. So it gives me an opportunity to talk to them about it.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Now, here’s where I’m going to put a Canadian plug in. I am a passionate Canadian guy and I love my hockey. So if you think of the Toronto Maple Leafs and their star player, Auston Matthews, look at his nose. It’s unbelievable. He’s got these big huge things. Anyway, that’s one of the things about breathing is that focus on good, slow, smooth, calm breathing through your nose and not your mouth, and you’ll be surprised that you will feel better. If you’re interested more on this nasal breathing stuff, the world authority on this is a fellow by the name of Patrick McKeown from Ireland.

Dr. Michael Robinson
There’s some very good books that you might want to pick up. One of them’s a small paperback called Close Your Mouth. He has training exercises in there for you. I highly recommend everyone learn these and share this with those that you love because nasal breathing is just a simple gift that we have to help us stay healthier. For those that find it difficult to breathe through their nose, they can train their nose to get to be more of a nasal breather. You’ll be surprised that this does work over a few-month period. You can become a healthier and a better nasal breather.

Dr. Michael Robinson
At nighttime, most people say, “I open my mouth and the games are off.” Every single night, I kid you not, I tape my mouth. I want this thing to work. It may sound crazy, but I recommend it. I give all my patients a roll of tape. If you’re interested more about this, get a hold through Erica. I can send you articles on this. But it’s really healthy stuff. Now, if you can’t breathe through your nose because there’s an obstruction in the way, that’s where a guy like me might be a first contact to say, “Look, this should get dealt with. Go and see an ear, nose, and throat doctor.”

Dr. Michael Robinson
You may have an obstruction in your nose. You may have an obstruction with adenoids or tonsils. Those can be dealt with, especially children. If you have children that aren’t breathing well, aren’t sleeping well, watch them sleep. You’ll probably find their mouth is open. And then if you look at the back of the mouth, you’re probably going to see big golf ball things. The problem, what’s happening in society is these kids that aren’t breathing well and aren’t sleeping well are usually poorly misdiagnosed as they go to school and they’re hyperactive.

Dr. Michael Robinson
They’re diagnosed as ADD or ADHD. Really, they need to get a good night’s sleep and they need to get good air. Many times I’m disappointed when I see that doctors have put these kids on some medicines that … Every drug has a side effect. I would rather them have no drugs at all. The best drug is our natural air and life itself, if that helps you, David, on that explanation. Nasal breathing is key. You can even look at a face to see if you think someone’s doing it. If they aren’t, then do whatever it takes to get the nose working.

David Poole
Just to clarify, do inhale and exhale through your nose?

Dr. Michael Robinson
Good point. Excellent. Absolutely. You want to inhale. It’s slow. The acronym that they use in the sleep world is LSD, long, slow, deep breaths in through your nose and long, slow, deep breaths out through your nose. The reason for that is when you breathe out through your nose, it actually keeps more carbon dioxide in the body, which is good because there’s a chemistry experiment going on inside your blood. The more carbon dioxide you have in your blood, the easier it is to use oxygen.

Dr. Michael Robinson
For example, think about when you were a kid. You might have done something stupid like, “Hey, let’s put our head in a bag and hyperventilate.” You got dizzy. The reason you got dizzy is because you’ve expelled too much CO2. So breathing should be … It’s a simple gift that we have to help calm ourself. Long, slow, deep, quiet breaths, that is as healthy as you can get. In through your nose and out through your nose, absolutely.

David Poole
Excellent. I didn’t expect to get good breathing tips, but I appreciate that. I will try and use them.

Dr. Michael Robinson

Anyway, that book, Patrick McKeown, he also has another book called The Oxygen Advantage. Really good books for anybody in life just to learn a little bit more about breathing. I think it’s one of those simple things that we can do to help ourselves, especially even in these times that are stressful. Breathing is another trick that we can use to calm ourselves as well as your product, which is fantastic.

David Poole
So can we talk for a minute? Remember the phenomenon when we were with Alex Tuch out at LVI and you had him do a strength test. And then you had him bite on a pencil. I know it’s really popular for a lot of athletes to use these guards, bite guards. It’s to increase oxygen. But what’s the phenomenon? What are you looking for? How do you help? What can we do as we [inaudible 00:16:36]?

Dr. Michael Robinson
Well, that’s interesting. So let’s go back to my original thing when I said that all the body can do is respond. We know that 80% of the population has a breakdown of their craniofacial skeleton. So what does that mean? They’re narrow faces. For example, you can look at a lot of movie stars. Let’s look at our Canadian, Justin Bieber. Everyone thinks he’s a really … He’s done so well in music, but look at his face. It’s narrow. It’s retruded. If you look at his profile from the side, he has a bigger nose because he has a narrow, retruded face.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Now, how did that happen? I’ll bet he was a mouth breather. So let’s go to a professional athlete like I met down in Las Vegas, this Tuch fellow. If you have a retruded jaw, you may have compression going on in this joint complex. So athletes, many times, and they’ve been living with this compression. They don’t even know that it’s affecting their performance. But it’s an interesting test that I can do on 80% of the people. You guys can try this at home, but I’ll explain the theory behind it.

Dr. Michael Robinson
A lot of times in a sport, we bring our jaw together to brace ourselves. It’s part of the psychological get-readiness for impact or performance or a goal. When you bring your teeth together, they’re like a precise set of 28 gears in a truck or a car. When they come together, they put your jaw joint in a certain position. If the craniofacial skeleton is narrowed and collapsed or retruded, like I’m saying 80% of the population is, then they’re actually compressing this joint when they prepare for sport or activity.

Dr. Michael Robinson
The little test I did on this athlete is I had him stand, feet together, hands together in front like this. I went to push on him and tip him over. He clenched and I could tip him over. And then I stuck a pen or pencil in his mouth. All that does, this is not an orthopedic, but this is just a device that moved his jaw forward and decompressed this joint. He was freaked out on how much stronger and better balanced he was. The reason for that is when you compress this joint, probably the most important nerve in our body runs through that. That’s called the trigeminal nerve.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Most of you people have probably heard of this nerve. The trigeminal nerve is the most important nerve because it goes to the organs that you and I need to do first, which is breathe and eat. That’s to stay survival. So the largest part of our brain is devoted to this trigeminal nerve. If it is getting compressed during this simple little exercise of me trying to tip you over and you bracing, if I decompress the joint and free up any potential problems with the nerve … Everyone should try this on themselves.

Dr. Michael Robinson
That’s what happened, David, when I did it on him. I can probably do this on 80% of the people and they’ll all go, “Wow.” So that’s why it’s important for athletes to see a guy like me or a physiologic dentist that understands that an orthopedic mouth guard, not your basic boil and bite or the kind that most dentists make where we take a mold. These mouth guards literally have a bite built into them that’s a little bit advanced. Your jaw’s a little bit forward. And then you’re respecting that joint and all of the comings of it.

Dr. Michael Robinson
That’s what that little magic … It sounds like magic, and he was … You’ll probably see that many professional athletes, if you really look closely, they are starting to wear orthopedic mouth guards. It’s just a little bit of an edge we can give them.

David Poole
Yeah, I was there. It was magic to me. Alex was stunned. He’s not a small guy. He’s 6’4″, 220, and you were pushing him around like a rag doll. So what can we do in the same place to do something like that? Not a boil and bite, but is there an orthopedic we can get off the shelf or order online? Or do we have to go see a dentist?

Dr. Michael Robinson
I would say you probably should look up an LVI-trained dentist. Google it. The reason for that is because most dentists, I’m going to use this saying, most doctors, most physicians, most, most people, they don’t know what they don’t know, and they’re not trained in this kind of stuff. They don’t even know how to make it. It’s not like it’s a difficult thing to make. But there are a number. You’re lucky. In the United States, you have a lot of fantastically trained LVI dentists.

Dr. Michael Robinson
You can find one in your neighborhood, I’m sure of it. So that’s something you could do. The company, Under Armour, is one. Everyone hears of that company. It’s very popular right now. I don’t think they make one of these, I call them, orthopedic mouth guards. But try the test on yourself. Some of these people on this forum right now may wear a mouth guard. Just try this little test. Stand up, one arm out to the side. Keep your feet tucked close together, clenched tight, one arm out to the side. Get someone to tip you over. Put your mouth guard in. Get someone to tip you over.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Take it out. Put a pen in that just moves your jaw and braces it a little more forward. You might be surprised that that pen makes you a stronger person. It’s not like you’re always clenching when you’re doing an activity, but many times in most sports we do have a bracing moment, so if that helps you.

David Poole
Thanks. Let’s transition over to stress for a minute. In our advertisement for tonight’s call, we called you an expert in stress. Spending a lot of time in dental practices and having dear friends in the dental space, you are truly an expert on stress. So what are you looking for in the body and emotion? What are the tells of someone that you know is having a real struggle coping and is very stressed out and you can see them right in the waiting room? What are you looking for in those patients?

Dr. Michael Robinson
Wow. That’s a loaded question. It’s a good one. It’s hard to tell if someone’s stressed. I think all of us know that. Some people are very good at hiding the stress inside of them. I’m very fortunate because I’m in a medical profession where by the time … Well, not necessarily the first appointment, but we work very hard on trying to build trust in our patients. So when a patient gets to know you, they start to open up a little bit more. I have an uncanny ability to … because it fuels me.

Dr. Michael Robinson
It is one of my passions of life, if I can get to know a person and find out what’s making them tick. We all know that everyone has a lot of stress, in fact, right now even more. Doesn’t matter what job you’re in. My job’s as stressful as anyone in this forum that I’m looking at today. We all have our moments. First, finding it out, do you have stress? I’m getting real good at asking patients, “How are you doing? What’s going on?” It’s a funny thing. Here’s a dentist asking that question.

Dr. Michael Robinson
The moment you walk into a dental office, behind me I have a needle in my hand I’m about to stick in your mouth. I’m about to do a procedure that could elicit pain. So stress is in my environment, period. Stress is in everyone’s personality as well. Some people are way better at doing it. This is where the NuCalm has been brilliant, brilliant. I can’t overemphasize. It literally gets used every day to help. I’ve been using NuCalm in the practice for coming up three years.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Every hygiene patient, they just go, “Can you hook me up with that stuff again, give me those headphones and let me listen to that cool music?” Here’s a little plug. I actually really do like the new neural patch because it was a little more complicated for my team just to explain what this electronic thing was going on. So the patch on the hand, the neural patch is really nice. But we offer our NuCalm to all our patients because we’re in a stressful environment. But it’s also because I like people, and I have a product that can help them.

Dr. Michael Robinson
We don’t charge for this, which is crazy. I know many dentists do. But it’s a bit of a practice builder. I’m building patients on them just knowing that we offer this product at the office. Everyone says, “Wow, I feel good.” In fact, some of these patients, it’s amazing. In 20 minutes, they fall asleep. That’s weird. In a dental office, someone falling asleep is pretty bizarre. So that’s how my connection with stress is. I get to work in a very personal space. We work within 16 to 18 inches.

Dr. Michael Robinson
That’s someone’s personal space. You can feel energy when you’re in that kind of space. So stress is definitely there because of our environment, but also just because of it’s in life. For new patients, we talk about it. But for regular patients, they all want it, which is nice.

David Poole
Can you talk a little bit, Michael, about your personal use of NuCalm and when you realized it could be really valuable too and how you habituated it?

Dr. Michael Robinson
Yeah, definitely. I may come across as a guy that’s got it all together. I don’t always, and I certainly didn’t. My passion for becoming this kind of physiologic dentist and going to LVI … This is a Canadian flying down to Las Vegas four to six times a year. Our dollar sucks. There’s one thing. That’s stress. So just do the math on this thing. This is a guy who’s going down to … For me to try to take upon this level of knowledge was unbelievably stressful, and then to bring it back and trying to implement it with my team.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Life itself was catching up with me. I was really stressed a few years ago. At LVI, they were using NuCalm on their patients and using it because they realized that you can help a person heal when you de-stress them, period. So that’s why LVI had adopted NuCalm a bunch of years ago. I got introduced to it down there, and I got thinking, “Holy cow. This is a pretty simple … It almost seems too good to be true.” But they let me use it down there, obviously, when I’m on course.

Dr. Michael Robinson
But I thought, “I’m just going to bite the bullet and buy two of these units.” I bought one for me and one for the office. I can tell you, it sounds like a cheap infomercial here. I have never looked back. I literally NuCalm every day. I have equipment in my office that measures blood pressure. It’s crazy. I can do some of these things you guys talk about on your studies. Some of my physical parameters, they’re better. So NuCalm has helped me with my stress of life, of business.

Dr. Michael Robinson
All businesses have their moments. Running a dental office that runs at a 75 to 80% overhead, managing or being a leader of six women, love them to death, but they can be complicated. That has its stress. NuCalm, it’s a little quick thing I can do or if I have an opportunity to throw 20 minutes into my afternoon, I will. It’s a no-brainer. So you people, you’re probably new with the product. I’m pretty sure you’re going to find it really neat for yourself.

Dr. Michael Robinson
I’m really excited with Erica’s given me a little bit of insight that you guys are trying to make this product a little different for the average public. I think if it’s accessible to more people, you’ll be able to help more people. Everyone has loved ones. Every one of my team is using NuCalm. I have one unit. This is something I shared with David. I have one unit in the office that we bought specifically to give to certain people that we know that are really going through hardship, whether they’re in cancer treatment or I had a patient this last fall that he just finished building his dream home and it burned down.

Dr. Michael Robinson
They had other family members that had died through age and through one tragic accident. I gave him the NuCalm unit for a couple months. Anyway, really liked it. Don’t just keep your unit to yourself, people. Share it. You’re going to make some happier people.

David Poole
How has NuCalm made your dentistry easier?

Dr. Michael Robinson
In hygiene, it’s interesting that hygiene patients, they’re calmer. I’m in a business. I need to sell product. It’s not a bad word. I’m proud of it. I can do great dentistry, but I can sell great dentistry too. If someone is calmer, they’re more apt to listen to the pros and cons, and then they can accept it. So right off the bat, NuCalm is a product they know that I have in the office. When we have consultations, if patients want to come in, some of them NuCalm first. And then we just sit and talk.

Dr. Michael Robinson
But a calmer patient is easier to work on. That’s for sure. It’s different. I can’t have as much three-way conversation with myself, my assistant, and my patient. I’m getting this dirty look from my assistant, “Hey, he’s NuCalming. Shut up.” But they are calmer. It just makes the whole thing flow better, and that I really appreciate.

David Poole
So you introduced the night you’re drinking a beer. Have you used NuCalm to resolve hangovers?

Dr. Michael Robinson
There’s a fun one. Absolutely. 100%. Another interesting thing that I use NuCalm for is travel. This has been a really neat one because I do travel to the US. The time difference for me to LVI is three hours. It’s just brilliant how it helps mess with that time zone. I know the science behind it because I’m a bit of a geek that way, the whole circadian. It helps to reset it or reboot it. It works, black and white. Just where I live, I have a lot of patients that work for Air Canada, one of our big air carriers.

Dr. Michael Robinson
I got a few of the pilots that I let them just take the extra unit and say, “Look, you fly to China, wherever you go.” I’ve got one, his regular route is China, not right now, obviously. But another one, his regular route is Switzerland. They just can’t believe how it does help that time zone thing. You would know. You could probably explain to the group a little bit better. But definitely use this product when you travel. It helps a bunch.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Not that you should be drinking beer all the time, but when you do and you have maybe too many, it helps in the morning or throughout the day.

David Poole
Listen, we’ve been around a lot of dentists. I’ve been to LVI many times. I’m always impressed at how deep in the night dentists go and they’re up and ready to go at 7:00 a.m., pretty impressive.

David Poole
All right. So that’s excellent. Let’s wrap it up. We’ve got some questions here for you, Michael, from the group. We’ve got one from Steven and the question is, “Is there an appliance that you would recommend for keeping your mouth closed instead of tape?”

Dr. Michael Robinson
To keep your mouth closed, beside of tape?

David Poole
Yeah, instead of tape.

Dr. Michael Robinson
No. No. A lot of people have breathing issues, sleep issues as well. For example, snoring is a … We laugh at it, but it’s a serious issue. So if anyone here is a snorer or you know someone that’s snoring, get them with an oral appliance that supports the jaw. Because most snoring is the tongue falling back into the airway, so you need to advance the jaw forward. Now, okay, I’ll add to that. Yes, you could use lots of training. But a lot of people have weak lips.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Orbicularis muscle is often very weak, especially in people that are mouth breathers. People that are nasal breathers tend to have a tighter muscle. So go on YouTube and learn about lip-strengthening exercises and tongue-strengthening exercises. There’s all kinds of them. But when you strengthen the muscles, they are more apt to rest in where they’re designed to, which is mouth closed, lips closed, tongue to the top of the roof. But I am now using tape as an … I just am comfortable using it now, and my nose works very well.

Dr. Michael Robinson
I can’t tape my mouth when I have a cold, but I’m kind of lucky. I don’t get many colds anymore because I’m exercising. I’m sleeping well. I’m eating well. I’m doing the things that we probably should be doing. But right now, tape is a simple thing. But strengthening the oral facial complex is a good one. So myofunctional therapy it’s called, but you can just go online and learn. There are some fun exercises you can do. It’s even better with your partner. Hope that helped.

David Poole
Yeah, no. That’s excellent. From Lena, “What do you think in general about straightening nasal septum? Does the risk of empty nose syndrome, is it worth it?”

Dr. Michael Robinson
Now, if the nasal septum, if you’re straightening it for aesthetics, that’s another thing. But if you’re straightening it because you’re not getting good air, I know many people that have had it done. It’s not a comfortable surgery but, if it’s done properly, it can help the proper flow of oxygen and air through your nose. So no, I’m for it, definitely. Breathing, it’s key. Everyone should be breathing through your nose all the time. Always breathing through your nose unless talking.

Dr. Michael Robinson
You’ll find the days that you talk a lot, you’re probably quite tired. That’s just because you haven’t been using your nose, and your body’s not as healthy as it could be. The days when I come home from work and I’ve done a lot of education with patients, I’m tired. My wife sometimes wonders why I’m quiet when I come home. Because I want this baby working.

David Poole
And then you tape your mouth shut. So yeah, she’s probably very curious. We’ve got a question from Philip, “Do you recommend mouth tape products when sleeping?” That’s redundant. What kind of tape products do you use, I guess?

Dr. Michael Robinson
It’s a 3M micropore two-inch, I think it is. If you contact Erica and you want to know more about that, I could put together a little bit of a cheat sheet for you with some of these products and that kind of thing. Sorry. To go back to someone we were talking about this oral appliances for sleeping, be very careful about those as well. Make sure that they are physiologically designed, not just your basic thing. The reason for that is most products that dentists are making have material on the inside, where I don’t.

Dr. Michael Robinson
The products that we make are designed to fit. The retention is designed from the outside of the teeth, not the inside. The moment you make the mouth smaller, think about it, you’ve just made the garage smaller. Your truck, which is your tongue, has less room to hang out in. If you make the garage smaller, the car goes in reverse and that further affects breathing. So for a sports appliance, it’s not as much of a factor, but for sleeping, you want the tongue on the roof of the mouth and forward.

Dr. Michael Robinson
You don’t want to make any of that stuff smaller. So there’s a lot to this. I hope I’m not confusing people by this. Respect what Mother Nature did, which is to create … If you look at really beautiful faces, they’re forward. They’re big. They have good jaw structure. Just look at some of the tribes that are in … They’ve found some of these tribes in India. They’re not exposed to all industrialization and all the poor foods. These people have beautiful faces. They have very little disease. They don’t have viruses.

Dr. Michael Robinson
They sleep well. They breathe well. It’s just common sense is what we need to go back to. Everything needs to revolve around that.

David Poole
You think they’re sheltering in place in those tribes or they don’t even know there’s a problem?

Dr. Michael Robinson
Sorry?

David Poole
I said do you think they’re sheltering in place in those tribes or they’re unaware that we’re in a pandemic?

Dr. Michael Robinson
I know. Yes.

David Poole
Another question from Lena, “Do you wear orthopedic mouth guard at night? What would you recommend to people with Ramsay Hunt syndrome after shingles in the ear? Muscles on one side of the face are dead and another side is extremely tense.”

Dr. Michael Robinson
Yeah. Again, stress is the common denominator here. So first off, nighttime, do I wear a … I wear an orthopedically-designed sleep appliance that holds my jaw forward and it respects the airway. So that’s what I do. I also tape my mouth. It seems strange, but I get way better sleep. I measure my sleep because I have equipment that I can measure, very similar things to what they do at a hospital. So that’s that one question answered. The other one is shingles and these kind of things, these are diseases that affect nerves in the body, stress of the nerve.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Things that are used in my world are called TENS unit. Anything that delivers calmness to or proper health to a muscle can help rejuvenate some of these things. So there are some very specifically-designed TENS units that helps people with shingle-like issues, also can help people with Bell’s palsy. Laser therapy, and I don’t know enough about it, but there are some very good work on lasers that help people with the ill effects of shingles and palsy-like symptoms or trigeminal neuralgia.

Dr. Michael Robinson
I use a TENS unit. It’s not DR-HO that you’ll hear. TENS stands for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. There are some very specifically-designed TENS units that helps the musculature after a palsy or a shingles type thing. I hope that helps a bit.

David Poole
Michael, what should people do about mercury fillings? I’ve got a mouthful of them. When I first saw Omer, he looked at me and said, “Get those out immediately.” That was eight years ago.

Dr. Michael Robinson
That’s very controversial. Most people know that mercury is not a great thing to be putting into your body. It was used because it was simple material to amalgamate with the metals that we used in silver fillings. There’s no reason for you to be putting that in your body now. Mercury fillings, the ill effects of them, you could extrapolate and say that mercury’s going to cause you neurological issues. I’m 60 years old, been practicing for 33, well, even more in dental school.

Dr. Michael Robinson
I think I’m pretty stable and I’ve been spending my life pulling mercury fillings out of … I’ve had my blood tested for mercury. I don’t have it. So I’m not too worried about mercury causing you issues via blood. But you might get some people that are real holistically, they might argue that. But I’m a practicing wet-footed dentist, so that’s one issue. One of the major things about mercury fillings, think of a thermometer. Mercury rises and lowers. Mercury fillings expand and contract more than our dental materials, modern ones.

Dr. Michael Robinson
They’re not bonded to your teeth. They’re just stuck in there. So they tend to crack teeth. So that might be a reason for removing them because your teeth are going to show lots of stress cracks in them. When you have mercury fillings taken out, just have it done in an environment that really upload your vitamin C because that might bind any potential vapors. Have it done in a situation where they’re using a high-volume suction and rubber dam. There’s some tricks we use in dentistry just to make it …

Dr. Michael Robinson
Do you need to take them out? I don’t know. David, you seem pretty stable to me. I don’t think it’s messed with you too much. But it’s a controversial thing. I don’t use them ever anymore. There’s much better materials that provide great strength, health, aesthetics, so that’s the way to go. But I don’t know. If I had a mouthful of them, if I were a neurological disorder patient, I would consider it. I have had a few of those over the years. Has it made them better? No. But I’d try anything if I was diagnosed with some of the diseases or some of the neurological issues. So I hope that helps you a bit.

David Poole
That’s excellent. So let’s wrap up with what are you excited about for the future of dentistry? What gets you really jazzed up about the next 10 years of practicing?

Dr. Michael Robinson
Good. I’m glad you’re asking that and not the negative side effect because corporate dentistry is not going to be good for patients, period. It’s a business. They’re going to want bottom line, and the patient’s going to lose. What I’m excited about for dentistry is I’m hoping there are more people like … I’m at the end of my career. I’m going to be going for another five, 10 years, but I’m excited for the young dentists that are passionate about really making a difference and doing the right thing.

Dr. Michael Robinson
We have so much knowledge. This place where I go to learn, LVI is definitely … I really think every dentist should be finishing dental school and then going and doing some of the courses there just to make sure they become a physician of the mouth, not a molar mechanic. This is a great time to be practicing dentistry, aside from this virus thing that’s going on. But there’s just so much advancements in material science and just science in general. NuCalm is a great thing.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Dentistry, just the word elicits stress in people. So NuCalm’s a great product that every dentist should be … It just should be a standard thing that everyone should be using. It’s just like they use freezing, they should be using NuCalm. So we have a whole bunch of good things going on in our business.

David Poole
Got a couple more questions for you, Michael. We’re not done yet. Alison Hobbs has a question, “Just curious, what is your favorite time of day to NuCalm?”

Dr. Michael Robinson
I have adopted the morning to do this. I go to bed at a good time, usually around 8:00, 8:30. I get up at around 4:30 to 5:00, and I NuCalm then. That’s worked well for me. On weekends, I NuCalm typically if I can pull myself 20, 30 minutes. It just finds it really charges me up for … gives me a little bit of energy there. I really wish I were doing it in my practice midday, but the way I work four days a week. We work busy during the four days. But it would be nice if I could do a 20-minute session.

Dr. Michael Robinson
I’ve been involved with NuCalm for quite a few years now. These 20-minute tracks, there’s some crazy stuff going on in them that really … I know my body well. You guys are lucky you’re coming into a time where NuCalm is even more advance than it was before and simpler and quicker. Get to know your own lifestyle. But if you can throw a 30-minute session into your day, I guarantee you. Everyone’s different. Mine tends to be the morning. It just works out because then when I come home, I can go for a good workout and a bike ride. It’s not practical for me to just lie in a bed and zone out then.

David Poole
We have a question from Brent, “Can you ask the doc if he knows Dr. Jerry Tennant or know of his work?”

Dr. Michael Robinson
I don’t. I’m sorry, no. I’m not that famous that I know everybody. I do put in a big plug for my Bill Dickerson, the founder of LVI. But I think if you were to research a current LVI dentist, you’re going to find someone that knows way more about health than a lot of people because I think a lot of dentists out there just don’t know what they don’t know. The dental school teaching is still prehistorical, every single school out there. You need to go to a more advanced facility. I hope I didn’t put down your dentist.

Brent
What I was saying was Dr. Jerry Tennant has a very interesting perspective on dentistry and the teeth are circuits of the body. He’s a pretty famous doctor in Texas. You might be very interested for your practice and your own knowledge of the work that he does as one of my doctors. But he has a whole platform and works with specific dentists and myofunctional therapists. But he bridges Eastern and Western. He really looks at the mouth as the teeth are circuits.

Brent
In his practice, he sees consistently when certain teeth are pulled or there’s bad root canals, that there’s all kinds of problems that happen in the entire system. So Dr. Jerry Tennant, you just might like it for [crosstalk 00:48:37]-

Dr. Michael Robinson
Yes. I’m writing it down. Thank you for that.

Brent
He’s a brilliant, brilliant man.

Dr. Michael Robinson
No, I totally agree that we need to think outside the box. There are people out there that … I’ll definitely look him up.

Brent
You’re going to love him. And then my other question was, have you read that book, Jaws: The Hidden Epidemic on mouth breathing?

Dr. Michael Robinson
No. I’m going to write that one down. I just love this.

Brent
It’s a game changer.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Okay. It’s about breathing?

Brent
It was written by an anthropologist and a dentist about the evolution of the mouth.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Oh yes. Yes. No, I know a little bit about this book.

Brent
It’s an amazing book.

Dr. Michael Robinson
It’s fantastic.

Brent
Yeah. The book is really knowledgeable on breathing. I think what you didn’t say to people is that you get something like 30 or 40% more oxygen into the blood when you breathe through your nose as opposed to your mouth. So when you’re breathing at night for eight hours and you’re breathing through your mouth, you’re depleting yourself of oxygen, which-

Dr. Michael Robinson
A lot of that has to do, it’s connection with the nitric oxide. It’s a wonderful drug that allows oxygen to enter into the bloodstream better. So nasal breathing, it’s a big one. I’ve sent all of my patients and most of my family, well, all of my family some interesting … Watch a YouTube video by Patrick McKeown.

Brent
He’s amazing.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Oh good. I’m glad you’re on-

Brent
Dr. Tennant’s going to do some stuff together. You’ll love Dr. Tennant. You’ll be really thrilled.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Well, good. Well, you look like you’re into health. You look pretty healthy, and your nose looks like it’s working. So that’s good.

Brent
I tape my mouth every night for three years.

Dr. Michael Robinson
See, people. He’s on it. You’re a good man. I bet you have friends of yours that think you’re out to lunch, but who cares? You’re healthier.

Brent
No, just my wife.

Dr. Michael Robinson
But she loves you. This is good.

Brent
She’s like, “What are you saying?”

Dr. Michael Robinson
Well, you can say that you’ve just met a guy tonight that does it every single night. Our seven-year-old, actually Jill is 13 now, but when she was seven years old she was chronically snoring and mouth breathing. It’s very difficult to convince an ear, nose, and throat doctor to take out tonsils and adenoids because they get paid piddly for it. So they really don’t like doing it. They’d rather write you a prescription and give you a pill. I was lucky enough to get her tonsils taken out and adenoids.

Dr. Michael Robinson
But she still was a mouth breather because out of habit. She was comfortable. So we started taping her mouth at night, and it’s black and white, the difference. It sounds crazy, people, but you want this thing working.

Brent
It’s a game changer.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Thanks. That was nice to hear those stories. I’ll definitely look up Dr. Jerry.

David Poole
We have a few more questions. Lena has another question, “Is it true that dental fillings will be replaced by something else soon?”

Dr. Michael Robinson
I don’t know about that. I would rather see people not have these, not need fillings. So do the right thing in the first place. Eat well. Respect hygiene, that kind of stuff. Dental fillings, I don’t know. Right now we’re still using a bonded composite for small and medium-sized fillings. The bonding techniques are fantastic. And then for anything medium to large, it’s porcelain. The mouth is a pretty harsh place. These are the strongest muscles in the body are these two. We’re looking at them, the masseters.

Dr. Michael Robinson
They generate enormous force. So we need to design dentistry to last. Sometimes we have to use better materials, like porcelain or you can use precious metals too. But no one wants to put gold in their mouth anymore. They’re going to look like Jay-Z the rapper or something. I don’t know. I’m not a world authority on dental fillings. Just try and keep my drill out of your mouth would be the best thing, and make sure you’re respecting those other things. For your children, it’s interesting. I fix broken people. That’s what I say.

Dr. Michael Robinson
I’d rather prevent them from being broken. So education to children and to young parents is way more rewarding because it’s very difficult to fix … I look at some of the people on this forum that are aging from 20s to 30s to 60s. It’s hard fixing people when you’re broken. So do the right thing in the beginning.

David Poole
Michael, what would you recommend for at-home healthcare, oral care? How many times should I floss and brush a day and when?

Dr. Michael Robinson
Well, a couple times a day is fine. Flossing, most people don’t do it. Those that do it, don’t do it well. So if you’re going to floss, do it firmly and toughen your gums up. But I’m a bigger fan of water picks. Water picks flush out the toxins better. But diet’s a big key on this too. Your mouth, all it can do is react. So watch what you’re putting in there. But yeah, keep it clean. Just a couple times a day is fine. Watch sugar, white death. Everyone knows that. Our body doesn’t do well with sugar.

David Poole
Three more questions. This is from Timothy, “A few years ago I went to a dentist to get a few crowns and get some drilling done. Now my bite feels messed up and my teeth are migrating. I’ve lost faith in my dentist, and I’m not sure how to find someone who I can trust. Any advice on finding the right person, and will this bite problem be affecting my posture?”

Dr. Michael Robinson
100%. It can. That definitely can. Again, dentists are often, we come out of dental school. I use this analogy. We have a hammer in our hand, so everything looks like a nail. Most dentists just keep that philosophy going on for life. One crown, one tooth, especially crowns, and most teeth that need crowning are the ones at the back because it’s all about forces. So if you’re messing with something in the back of the mouth, you can definitely change the bite, which goes back to this whole jaw joint thing I was talking about.

Dr. Michael Robinson
If you collapse the bite a little bit or compress it, you can then send … Dentists, they’re just doing all they know how to do. So for you, for correcting that, you really want to look for someone that is well-trained in this. All I can say is that if you go on the web and look up LVI and look for a current, not an old one. It’s constantly evolving. That would be one recommendation. I’m north of Toronto. You can fly up and see me. We have so many different ways of evaluating bites nowadays.

Dr. Michael Robinson
It’s not just done with a little piece of paper you stick in the mouth. We have science now. I have a computer pad that you literally can bite into and it shows me the timing of where and when and how much you bite on a tooth. It helps me analyze that. If you’re showing up with symptoms, you may have compression in your joint. It can be a complicated thing. It’s too bad that you’ve ended up like this. But it’s very common. I was guilty of that too when I was practicing to what I thought was the best dentistry I could. But I know I probably created a few nightmares in the problem.

Dr. Michael Robinson
All I can do is continue to learn and look for a person that is doing that kind of learning because it’s no fun to have jaw problems that you might be having right now.

David Poole
Lastly, last question, this is from Leslie and her comment is, “I’m surprised to hear that you recommend removal of the tonsils and adenoids to improve breathing. Don’t these organs serve a natural purpose in filtering viruses as a first defense to germ invasion?”

Dr. Michael Robinson
They do at a very young age. But, again, if you’re respecting all the … Adenoids and tonsils are reactive tissue in the body. If things are going well, they don’t need to react. They don’t need to swell. So key, breathing properly is, in my opinion, probably one of the most important things that we do. It isn’t ideal that you take them out initially. For example, most adenoids and tonsil issues are at a young age. So let’s look to figure out what is the allergen that’s causing this child probably to have swollen tonsils and adenoids?

Dr. Michael Robinson
It’s usually milk. If it’s not milk, it’s an animal. If it’s not an animal, it’s dust. There’s a bunch of things that we can look at to try and eliminate the insult to these tissues. But if you can’t get the tissues under control and get them out of there because you want that child breathing properly so they are healthier. They will learn better. They’ll facially develop better because they’re not mouth breathers. Mouth breathing is a curse for collapse of the craniofacial skeleton and retrusion of the jaw and all the problems that come from it.

Dr. Michael Robinson
So yeah. It’s not ideal that we’re taking them out, but sometimes it is ideal if you can’t get the breathing working. I hope that helps.

David Poole
All right, my friend. That was a great hour. Really appreciate all the insights. Really appreciate what you do. Continue learning. You’ve got 20 more years to practice. Thanks for donating Erica to us. We love and adore her.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Yeah. You got a good one there. Anyway, really nice to talk to you people a little bit tonight. Thank you for your questions and some of the tidbits. I’ve got some more work to do. I wish you all the best in being calm. You got a good tool. It’ll help.

David Poole
Thanks, Michael. Take care, buddy.

Dr. Michael Robinson
Bye, guys.

David Poole
Bye, everybody. Appreciate your time tonight.