NuCalm Tell-All with Jim and David Poole

Today’s show is a special edition with NuCalm’s CEO, Jim Poole!

“It’s easy to get amped up during the day, it’s easy to have caffeine or stimulants to amp you up. It’s not so easy to kind of slow yourself down, and people who try to meditate would understand this, it’s really difficult to kind of slow down the monkey mind.”

— Jim Poole

Whether you’re dealing with sleep debt or high stress, Jim elaborates on how NuCalm accommodates everyone! He shares the humble beginnings of Solace LifeSciences, Inc., how NuCalm started and even some of his favorite tracks. You do not want to miss this Tell-All Episode!

 

Listen to This Is NuCalm on Apple & Spotify!

 

Jim Poole, President & CEO of Solace LifeSciences, Inc. 

Jim is an accomplished business executive with extensive experience in the healthcare, biotechnology, dental, market research, and IT industries.  Mr. Poole manages the strategic direction and ongoing operations of Solace Lifesciences, Inc., a neuroscience company focused on personalized wellness and performance.  In 2015, Solace Lifesciences, the maker of NuCalm, was granted the world’s sole patent for “Systems and Methods for Balancing and Maintaining the Health of the Human Autonomic Nervous System.”

A New York state native, Poole earned a BA in psychology from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and an MBA in International Business & Marketing from Babson College.

Connect with Jim Poole on LinkedIn



Key Takeaways

[1:00] Jim welcomes listeners to a very special episode of This is NuCalm podcast!

 

[4:08] From Alpha to Theta and their respective hertz frequencies, Jim breaks down the stages and the technical and biological inner workings of the NuCalm experience.

 

[7:30] Jim explains “The Healing Zone,” the unique, once-a-day frequency at which your cells do their maintenance and your ATP is restored, as well as how it provides an opportunity for homeostasis.

 

[13:40] So how should you use NuCalm? Jim talks about the human body as a closed-loop ecosystem and how it should impact your personal usage.

 

[16:20] So you got your Faraday NuCalm bag and found a disk, an eye-mask, and an app. Jim explains each component as well as its function within the NuCalm system starting with the biochemical disk(and some of its fascinating history!)

 

[26:20] The disk was put through a rigorous evaluation process beginning in 2018 with the incredible scientific, sports, and medical advisors that NuCalm trusts (from NASA to Harvard to the NFL, MMA/UFC, USTA, DOD, FBI, Special Forces, etc…)

 

[29:20] The third component of NuCalm is the app, and is by far the most complex in that it paces brain function. Jim talks about the cornucopia of software design and algorithms at your disposal.

 

[34:18] Jim shares his favorite tracks as well as which to use and when as you begin and how each of them is designed to perform.

 

[42:40] Listener questions! Starting with question 1: When you don’t reach your natural wake state at the end of a session, what is the recommended extension time?

 

[45:12] On NuCalm and sleep.

 

[47:09] Are there overlapping uses for reboot and rescue?

 

[48:43] More on NuCalm and sleep!

 

[50:25] Should I NuCalm again if I finish and I feel sleepy?

 

[52:08] Combining NuCalm with other modalities?

 

[54:49] Using NuCalm right after a meal?

 

[56:06] Which track should I use when I am tired and lethargic in the afternoon?

 

[57:16] Sleep compensation with NuCalm, is it a good idea?

 

[58:49] Are the track options curated for me or are they random?

 

[1:00:47] Using NuCalm during flights?

 

[1:01:59] Using NuCalm pre-op and post-op?

 

[1:03:49] NuCalm and micro-dosing of psilocybin?

 

[1:05:32] Could you explain the Faraday cage the disks come in?

 

[1:07:09] Can you develop a program that promotes confidence and body positivity?

 

[1:09:30] How can NuCalm help me return to sleep?

 

[1:11:18] Does NuCalm increase or lower cortisol?

 

[1:12:43] Should I use NuCalm before or after working out?

 

[1:13:57] When is the sleep product coming out?

 

[1:16:06] Pausing shipment of disks and pausing the app?

 

[1:16:25] Where do I see my usage?

 

[1:18:40] Can leaving the disk overnight cause a red mark?

 

[1:20:45] Is there any benefit to listening to the tracks without the disks?

 

[1:23:18] David wraps up the show by thanking listeners and Jim for being so generous with his time.

 

Continue on your journey and until next time, breathe deep, relax, and keep looking forward.

 

More about NuCalm and the podcast

This is NuCalm, the show for those looking to improve sleep quality, manage stress, and boost recovery. Brought to you by Solace Lifesciences, the makers of NuCalm, the world’s only patented and proven neuroscience technology that works within minutes, without drugs, every time! In over one million medical sessions, NuCalm has helped men and women around the world.

 

NuCalm: stress relief for the way we live today, technology to help you disconnect.

 


Full Transcript

 

Jim Poole

Welcome. Welcome, everybody, to the NuCalm family. It’s an honor and a privilege to be here with you tonight. It’s also an honor and a privilege for you to bring NuCalm into your household, into your life, into your brain, into the brain of your spouses, your children, your parents, your family members.

 

Jim Poole

This company is beginning its 20th year. When David said we were a small team, we have about 25 core team members that are on a mission to help 7.6 billion people. We’re relatively outnumbered, but we have a really powerful technology that’s predictable, safe, easy to use, and we’ve been honing our skills on the tech for about 30 years.

 

Jim Poole

This technology was born out of the brain and the passion and the determination of Dr. G. Blake Holloway, a pioneering neuroscientist, quantum physicist, naturopath. About 20 years of invention went into this, and then as Dave alluded to, in September of 2010, we launched to the medical community a $5,995 highly regulated class III medical device that was four components and a little more complex than what you have.

 

Jim Poole

In essence, if you want to break it down to the core common denominator of what we’re doing, we are managing your brainwave frequency. We are helping you relax when your brain really doesn’t want to relax. If you look at the biorhythm of a human in a 24-hour period from wake up, from when the sun rises, your cortisol at your highest level, and that’s your stress hormone and your monkey mind kicks in.

 

Jim Poole

Then as the day progresses, there’s a biorhythm dip between 1200 and 400 in the afternoon, sometimes commensurate with food and eating too much at lunch and the digestive process. Then when the sun goes down, your body should start whining down.

 

Jim Poole

So, in that time of daylight, your brain is active. Well, we are going to slow you down in that time. So, there’s a couple of things that are a challenge for us. Number one, managing the human brainwave function is exceptionally ambitious and exceptionally difficult. If it took this really bright quantum physicist 20 years to figure it out, that gives you an idea of the meticulous design involved.

 

Jim Poole

The second thing is simply inertia. It’s easy to get amped up during the day. It’s easy to have caffeine or any type of stimulant amp you up or exercise. It’s not so easy to slow yourself down. People who try to meditate would understand this. It’s really difficult to slow down a monkey mind.

 

Jim Poole

So, this product was designed with the outcome right out of the gate. The outcome is to suspend your brainwave function into the sweet spot of healing. The first stage and the first part of the experience is alpha brainwave function, and all of this is difficult to articulate. There’s no vernacular new English language that really articulates well what the experience is. Fortunately, everybody on this call, you have experienced this. So, you may not understand it, but you know experientially what’s happening to you.

 

Jim Poole

In the first several minutes of NuCalm, your mind wanders. Nothing really happens, and then at some point, you’ll feel a separation of your monkey mind, which is on this nonlinear thinking pattern, and your body separates. If you pay attention, your body starts to feel really heavy and your respiration slows down. That’s you moving in from alpha and then into theta. Theta is a very deep state. It’s just above deep sleep.

 

Jim Poole

In theta, you may be in and out of lucid dreaming. You’re hovering just above sleep. You’re in and out of maybe darkness, where you don’t even know where you’d go. If you are aware of your body, let’s say you have an itch on your nose, it would be really difficult to create the motivation to move your arm if you can’t even find your arm. So, that’s theta.

 

Jim Poole

How we do this? What are the mechanisms involved? Well, what you have in your possession is the three-component system. NuCalm, the desired outcome is to suspend you in this healing state and allow your body to recover, restore on a cellular level for as long as you need it, when you need it in that day.

 

Jim Poole

The correlation between the time you’re in NuCalm is direct to your current stress level, your nutrition, and your sleep quality. So, some days, you may in NuCalm using Rescue 50 for 35 minutes. You may be in NuCalm using Rescue 70 like me tonight for 51 minutes. That’s a long NuCalm for me, but, clearly, I was tired.

 

Jim Poole

So, the NuCalm experience, though the biochemistry and the physics is going to do exactly to you that it does to me, that it does to everybody else on the planet, your experience in the time in that session is unique to you at this time in your life. Okay?

 

Jim Poole

So, let’s get in to what we’re doing, and how we’re doing it. In 2010, the expressed intent was to suspend your brainwave function into alpha and theta. Actually, you know what? Let me get a little deeper into alpha and theta first.

 

Jim Poole

When you think brainwave function, let’s think of caffeine. So, you wake up, you’re a little groggy, your alarm goes off, you get snoozed twice, your body feels lethargic, your joints are a little inflamed, you get to the bathroom, and you’re starting to get out of that fog and start your to-do list. Let’s just start your to-do list, your monkey mind and cortisol accelerate and you might be thinking a little clearly, but you go have your first cup of coffee. Within a couple of sips of that coffee, you noticed your neurons are firing faster. You’re thinking a little more clearly. You’re starting to get energized and things don’t seem so insurmountable. That’s simply increasing your brainwave frequency, so from maybe 13 Hertz up to 16 to 17 Hertz. The focus area for brainwave frequency is between 15 Hertz and 20 Hertz. So, this is all frequency-related. Okay?

 

Jim Poole

Alpha brainwave frequency is a slower brainwave frequency than beta, and beta is alert. So, alpha is 12 Hertz to 8 Hertz, all right? In alpha brainwave function, there’s a creativity. There’s a sense of relaxation, maybe some inner peace, and it’s also commensurate with transcendental meditation. So, for those of you who are studied in the art of transcendental meditation, where your brainwave function goes to in that still point is alpha brainwave function.

 

Jim Poole

Then we’re going to take you down a little lower into theta. Theta is the healing zone. This is the coup de grâce of the brainwave frequency over a 24-hour period. Why is that? When your brainwave function is in theta, your body is manifesting a certain characteristic that’s really important. Number one, your cells are cleaning their toxins and doing their cellular maintenance. This is the only time in your 24-hour life cycle in a day that your cells clean their toxin. This is really important.

 

Jim Poole

Number two, your mitochondria and ATP is restored. This is the energy source for your cells. So, your body has trillions of cells. Each cell has a defined role and a job to do. Over the course of our lifetime, 20 years old, 30 years old, 40 years old, and we’re pushing through, and we’re a type A personality, and when we’re feeling like we need a break, we don’t. We exercise. We get an espresso. We keep going. We run through walls, and we challenge our resilience because our mind is writing checks our body shouldn’t be cashing. Okay.

 

Jim Poole

Over the course of time, when we live in a cycle of high stress, poor sleep, when your cells don’t clean their toxins, this is a long-term issue. This isn’t short-term. Say you work hard for 24 hours straight, you’re not going to develop disease from 48 hours, but over the course of time, when you don’t get that quality of sleep, specifically stage two as a sleep architecture, specifically theta brainwave function, your body begins to break down.

 

Jim Poole

So, in theta, your cells clean their toxins. The ATP and mitochondria is restored. That’s the cellular restoration and the key to the healing zone. So, when you hear us talk about putting you into the healing zone, that’s what we’re talking about.

 

Jim Poole

Physically, when you get out from NuCalm, you feel very loose. Your shoulders feel lower. You feel more attached to the ground, and you just feel relaxed. How did we do that? What’s going on? It’s simple. In theta, your body slows down. We’re synchronizing your heart with your lungs, and when you feel your body separate near the 10-minute mark of Rescue, and you’ve really start to fall into your bed, we’re slowing you down. We’re synchronizing your heart with your lungs and we’re allowing for diaphragmatic breathing. In fact, we’re allowing for the most volumetric breath your body can absorb.

 

Jim Poole

Now, oxygen is a healing property of the human body. Okay? So, if we can slow you down, have you breathe one breath every 10 seconds, six breaths a minute, you win because now your body will be filled with oxygen-rich red blood cells that can begin the healing property.

 

Jim Poole

So, physically, you feel relaxed. This isn’t magic. We simply oxygenated the entire ecosystem of your body. We’ve flushed out lactic acid, and we lowered inflammation. Great. That’s the recovery piece on the physical side.

 

Jim Poole

More importantly, the more you NuCalm, the more you’re going to feel the sensation of exceptional clarity, optimism, feel really good, patient, present in the moment, things that were bothering you don’t bother you anymore, chatter in your head. Most humans that I know have five or six conversations going on in their head at all times.

 

Jim Poole

When you get out from NuCalm, if you pay attention to it, there is no chatter. It’s gone. Okay? What did we do? Again, it’s not magic. We oxygenated the prefrontal and frontal cortex of your brain. This is the executive thinking, function, cognition, character, personality. This is what separates us from primates. Okay? We’re not reptilian limbic system autonomic nervous system brain dominant. Everything is up here. So, if you oxygenate this area, you resolve the body’s autonomic nervous system ability to sabotage our thinking and we think clearly.

 

Jim Poole

So, NuCalm is using biochemistry and physics to command this relaxation response in a simple, safe, predictable manner. Every human operates in the same manner. Your brain and your body communicate only two ways, biochemical and electrical signaling. That’s it. There is no third way. There is no alternative.

 

Jim Poole

NuCalm uses biochemistry and physical, biochemistry in the form of relaxing the adrenals to slow down adrenaline and physics in presenting your brain with a pattern using this sophisticate neuroacoustic software.

 

Jim Poole

So, the combination, those three components are meticulously designed over 30 years of invention and 11 years of continuous product development and improvement to deliver one specific outcome, suspend your brainwave function in theta, allow your body to heal for as long as it needs to heal, then you get up and you feel good.

 

Jim Poole

So, what we’re imposing upon you as a human being for a 25, 35, 45, 55-minute timeframe is the opportunity to unplug, to allow the body to create what’s called homeostasis or balance and help you live a better life.

 

Jim Poole

Homeostasis or balance, what is that? Your body always wants that. Our monkey minds don’t allow it. According to the monks, we have 1,000 thoughts an hour. For a type A personality, it might be 1,500 thoughts an hour. Most of them are not on our own. They originate externally. They’re constantly moving.

 

Jim Poole

What happens when we’re filled with this monkey mind is we’re flushing cortisol and catecholamines and all these excitatory neurotransmitters, and we’re constantly go, go, go, but we’re also breathing shallow. We’re not getting the balance the body covets. NuCalm doesn’t discriminate. It doesn’t ask permission. It simply says, “We’re going to take a break right now.”

 

Jim Poole

Whatever is plaguing you, whatever is challenging you, whatever obstacles are in your way, whatever is clouding your vision, making you impatient, making you agitated, we don’t care. We’re simply going to take you to a place, allow you to restore, recover, rejuvenate and then get up and be on your way.

 

Jim Poole

It’s incredible. It’s an incredible gift to humanity. It’s an incredible complex science. I tell people, I say, “Don’t allow these three components to belie the sophistication and meticulous design of 30 years of a neuroscience platform.

 

Jim Poole

The math and the physics and the algorithms and the biochemistry is incredibly complex. Great, but no one really cares. How do you use it? When do I use it? Why do I use it? What should I expect? How much does it cost? That’s what we’ve learned. That’s what humans care about, and that’s what we should care about. Unless you’re an applied neuropsychobiologist or a statistical biophysicist, no one else really cares.

 

Jim Poole

So, that’s what we’re doing. How to use it? It’s completely up to you. I don’t know your nutrition. I don’t know your current stress level. I don’t know if you’re moving, you’ve had a deceased loved one, you’re in a divorce, you’re breaking up. We have no idea the external stress you’re under. Okay? We can suppose that it’s pretty powerful stress considering the life we’re living today as humans.

 

Jim Poole

We also don’t know your nutrition. We don’t know your history. We don’t know your epigenetics. We don’t know your predisposition to disease states. We don’t know your immunosuppressive disease state. We don’t know if cortisols already interrupted your tummy and you have ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease. There’s a myriad of things that challenge a human condition. There’s a few things that we know, for sure.

 

Jim Poole

Number one, the human body is a closed loop ecosystem, exceptionally good at compensation. You tweak one thing in the body or the brain, the brain sees that and compensates. You do another thing, sees and compensates. This is the litany of taking drugs and seeing side effects in this cascade of events.

 

Jim Poole

The second thing we know, it’s irrefutable in the law of being human, is that we can normalize the craziest experiences. We pretty much have normalized the unnormal now, right? 2021 in January, things are not normal. We’re not even sure what the new normal will be. The only thing today is uncertainty. All right? So, the body’s ability to normalize crazy is powerful, but it’s dangerous because then we think we don’t need balance. We think we can just keep going and keep pushing, but with cellular breakdown, that mindset leads to adrenal fatigue, and eventually cellular destruction and disease.

 

Jim Poole

When you look at the literature and it says 98% of all diseases are created by stress, that’s how this happens. It’s a prolonged systemic approach of breaking down the cellular structure because the cells don’t clean their toxins, you don’t get enough restorative sleep, you live in a high stress poor sleep life cycle, and eventually you break down.

 

Jim Poole

We can’t tell you what disease you’re going to get. There’s a lot of corollaries to what disease you’re going to get, but we can tell you you will get a disease. That is anatomy and physiology. It’s not up for debate. It’s not up for hypothesis. It’s simply anatomy. Okay?

 

Jim Poole

So, David, what I’d like to do now, if you don’t mind, is walk down the three components that they’re currently using in the NuCalm system. Is that okay?

 

David Poole

You’re the boss. Do it.

 

Jim Poole

All right. So, you have NuCalm. It came in a neoprene bag, I think that one there behind me, and you opened up this Faraday bag, an anti-static bag, and there’s a disc. Okay? This disc. This disc is the biochemistry component of NuCalm. You got an eye mask. Simple. You were visually stimulated by light. You can’t relax, meditate, sleep with your eyes open. So, there’s an eye mask. Then there’s the app. We’re not an app company. We’re not a music company. We’re not a software company. We’re a neuroscience company with a designed outcome, an expressed intent to physiologically change your body every time you do NuCalm. How we go about this is constantly evolving. We are constantly investing money in making this easier, better, more effective and a more enjoyable experience.

 

Jim Poole

So, let’s start with the disc. This is the biochemistry. What’s the importance of the disc? The disc is designed to create a level playing field. Your body has a central nervous system and an autonomic nervous system. The autonomic nervous system is really profound and its 40 million years evolved. The autonomic nervous system, which also incorporates the limbic system is our fight or flight response, but it also governs and oversees human fear, stress, anxiety, depression, and worry. Fear, stress, anxiety, depression, and worry, you think it’s important in our humanity and how we exist everyday? Yes.

 

Jim Poole

So, the autonomic nervous system, which has a neuronal network of all of this complexity is 40 million years evolved. Your prefrontal cortex and your frontal cortex, your character, your personality, your logic, your executive functioning, the things that you do to operationalize your day like get up and put your clothes on, that’s four million years evolved. So, we are fighting as humans of 36 million year had start from the saboteur called the autonomic nervous system that shows up and creates anxiety, and depression, and fear, and worry. Okay? So, that’s what’s happening inside our head, and it’s the battle we all fight.

 

Jim Poole

Well, when your central nervous system knows that you’re going to try something new you’ve never tried or you’re going to go on for a surgical procedure, a treatment or a medicament or anything. Your central nervous system is really, really smart. It has one primary function, protect you, keep you alive. You can look at Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. We can think about the psychology of needing intimacy and a social network. We can think of food and water and sex and all that stuff. It means nothing if you’re not alive.

 

Jim Poole

So, the central nervous system has one primary function above all, keep you alive. So, you’re constantly evaluating your surroundings for safety, security, and familiarity. In doing so, when your central nervous system is unaware, is scared, perceives a threat, it activates the autonomic nervous system, that 40 million year reptilian side of our brain that manages the fight or flight system.

 

Jim Poole

So, this disc represents the biochemistry with the expressed intent of slowing down your adrenals, so that we put to rest that fight or flight mechanism. You can’t really relax if you’re in a high stress state. Okay? So, that’s what it’s doing.

 

Jim Poole

How’s it doing it? When we first started, Dr. Holloway knew the goal here is to slow your brainwave function down, present a beat to your brain that your brain follows. In order to make a predictable, safe, fast-acting, and deep experience, we have to manage the human body’s adrenals. Your ability to resist through stress in this adrenal cortex is incredibly profound and different for all of us and different everyday with what happens in our life. Today, you might be more stressed than yesterday. Yesterday you might be less stressed. Who knows? Okay?

 

Jim Poole

So, when we started, we said, “We have to present the brain with the body’s natural occurring amino acid called GABA, gamma aminobutyric acid A and B. GABA has a very powerful primary function in the biochemistry of the brain. The GABA A receptor site is primarily responsible for anything biochemically that creates a relaxation response. It’s called anxiolysis, anti-anxiety.

 

Jim Poole

What does that mean? In your brain, when you drink a sip of alcohol and you feel the weight of the world fall off and you’re like, “Okay. Life isn’t so bad,” that feeling doesn’t happen because of alcohol’s magic. It happens because alcohol binds to the GABA A receptor site.

 

Jim Poole

Barbiturates bind to the GABA A receptor site. Benzodiazepines bind to the GABA A receptor site. The GABA A receptor site interrupts what’s called the HPA axis, the hypothalamic anterior pituitary adrenal cortex. This disc binds the GABA A and GABA B, activates the GABAergic system and slows down the adrenal cortex so you’re not expressing a lot of adrenaline and creating a stressful response when we want you to relax.

 

Jim Poole

When we first came to market, we had three large chewable tablets. They were grotesque in size. Dave loved the flavor. There was a citric feel to it, and there’s also a Pavlovian feel to it, but you had to chew them up. We wanted sublingual absorption because we wanted them absorbed in the capillaries under your tongue so that they’d enter the bloodstream.

 

Jim Poole

So, you chew and you hold these for two minutes, and then you’d swallow it. Well, in looking at neurotransmitter panels and looking at the biochemistry, Dr. Holloway was wholly unimpressed with the inability of the body to absorb and actually activate the GABA that was in the tablet.

 

Jim Poole

So, Dr. Holloway, like most inventors, moved to Russia. That’s not like most inventors. I don’t know any inventor that moved to Russia. Well, he moved to Russia. Why? To study cranial electrotherapy stimulation. Why? Because he knew it was a way to electrophoreat the cell wall membrane and open up the receptor sites to the nutrients in the chewable tablet.

 

Jim Poole

So, this served as a catalyst. This is a ton of effort and a ton of work trying to trick the brain and figure out the best avenue to relax you without giving you cognitively impaired drugs and alcohol. That’s what we started with.

 

Jim Poole

So, when we came to market in September of 2010 with a highly regulated FDA class III medical device, it was a cranial electrotherapy stimulation device that was brain science. It basically created a low-level micro current that electrophoreated and lowered the cell wall membrane of the GABA A receptor site so the chewable supplement and the nutrients in the supplement worked.

 

Jim Poole

This is incredible. This is about 10 years of trial and error and figuring out all this chemistry, and we did it, but it was clumsy. So, that was the origination of the biochemistry of NuCalm.

 

Jim Poole

About five years into this, as we’re doing all these medical procedures, we’re measuring everything. We’re looking at galvanic skin response, blood pressure, heart rate, metabolic processing of local anesthesia, pulse oximetry, heart rate variability. We’re seeing that asking a human being to chew something and hold in their mouth for two minutes and ordering them and then telling them to swallow is actually creating agitated response. We didn’t like it.

 

Jim Poole

So, for about four years, we worked with combinatorial chemists and chemists to figure out how do we create a transdermal cream that’s highly absorbent, applied on the neck that has the same nutrients of the chewable supplement. So, that’s what we did. Six years ago, we launched a transdermal cream.

 

Jim Poole

The cream, though it was more absorbent and brought more nutrients into the bloodstream, it still was challenge with the electrophoresis of the cell wall membrane, the blood-brain barrier, et cetera. So, we needed the stimulation device.

 

Jim Poole

Five and a half years ago, we’ve been using the cream for several years, Dr. Holloway began the next quest because we’re ever perpetually evolving to make things easier. This is the result of five and a half years of research and development. Essentially, it’s using electromedicine. So, for those of you familiar with Nikola Tesla or George Lakhovsky, electromedicine has been around since the 1920s and 1930s, the 1920s and 1930s, not 2020. It’s 100 years evolved.

 

Jim Poole

This disc, it looks like sticker that you get out of a comic book. This is a highly, highly evolved sophisticated piece of equipment. There’s a six layer Lakhovsky multi-wave oscillator on top of this disc holding a biostatic charge.

 

Jim Poole

So, over the course of several years, Dr. Holloway figured out the exact frequency of the nutrients that were in the chewable tablet and then in the cream. We’ve created this cornucopia of really powerful inhibitory neurotransmitters, but how do we create it and put it into a software to imprint on a Lakhovsky multi-wave oscillator, apply it to your wrist, and activate it to your brain? That was the challenge. Five and a half years of work.

 

Jim Poole

He used German physicist and Chinese ancient medicine experts to determine and validate the specific frequencies of GABA A, GABA B, L-theanine, casein tryptic hydrolysate , and L-tyrosine. That’s what’s on here.

 

Jim Poole

So, this disc incorporates what used to be in a chewable tablet catalyzed by stimulation. Then it was in a transdermal cream catalyzed by stimulation. Now, it resides on a disc. It’s electromedicine. It’s bioresonance. It’s like a tuning fork. When applied accurately and appropriately to the pericardium 6 and the pressure point placement is important, it turns in your Gauss field. You have an electromagnetism. This is electromagnetism. It turns on, and it simply presents your brain with a signal of GABA A.

 

 

Jim Poole

Now, your body is all resonance. Everything in life is vibration. Everything has a specific frequency. I look different today than I did yesterday. Why? Because I’m vibrating at a different frequency. So, when the brain gets this presentation of GABA, this here begins to resonate at that frequency. This is frequency medicine, bioresonance, like a tuning fork. That’s what we’re doing with the disc.

 

Jim Poole

So, we don’t do anything lightly. We’re very methodical in our approach, and we’re a proven hardcore neuroscience company. This is our 20th year. Okay? I got this in my possession on July 18th, 2018, this disc. Tried it. Talked to Dr. Holloway, started the evaluation process. We have 52 medical advisors on our advisory board, including some of the best scientists in the world from NASA, from Harvard, the former medical director of the NFL, physicists from across the world. This group, we got the disc in their hands. We also work with 49 professional sports teams, 58 MMA UFC fighters, the USTA, golfers. We got this into the hands of our elite performers, and we also work with the active DOD, military, special forces, the FBI HRT.

 

Jim Poole

So, what we did is we got this out there. For them, as we’re doing our medical evaluation internally, we simply said, “This is what we want you to do. We want on day one for you to use the cream and the stimulation device. On day two, use the disc. On day three, use the cream and stimulation device, and day four, use the disc. On day five, use the cream and stimulation device.” You get the point? Looking at HRV, looking at heart rate, blood pressure, whatever thing you wanted to look at, cortisol levels, it didn’t matter. Everyone had their different medical practice and their different ideas of how to evaluate technology quantitatively.

 

Jim Poole

To a person, over one year we did this, not one person came back and said, “The disc was less effective.” There were times where it was the same efficacy, but it was never less effective. On July of 2019, a year later, we launched the disc and, thus, allowed us the opportunity to create a more portable and eventually more affordable version of NuCalm. This is simply the biochemistry aspect of NuCalm.

 

Jim Poole

With this disc, what you get is a very predictable, fast-acting, and deeply relaxing and restorative experience with NuCalm. This is a facilitator and a catalyst to ensure that every time you NuCalm, in the ninth minute, your brainwave function is at a certain mathematical frequency. In the 12th minute, your brain is at a certain mathematical frequency. This allows the predictability of the NuCalm experience. This is a systematic approach.

 

Jim Poole

Remember, your brain and body communicate only two ways, biochemical and electrical. So, we’re going to use both channels to create this intention of taking you to the healing zone. That is the path of the disc.

 

Jim Poole

Now, this is a platform technology. This is a new way to create or present nutrients to the body. We were doing some really cool fantastic research, someone at the DOD around really complex ways to deliver different nutrients to the body. Okay? So, that is incredible. Really cool, but, really, it’s easy to use, and it’s effective.

 

Jim Poole

The second component is an eye mask. That’s really simple. Close your eyes, but even when you close your eyes, light will permeate your eyelids. So, put that eye mask on. It’s very helpful, and it’s part of the process.

 

Jim Poole

The third component of NuCalm is the most complex part. We are going to entrain or pace your brainwave function into alpha and theta. We’re going to use the auditory motor cortex. We’re going to use your ears as the carrier of signal to present your brain with a pattern, and the sophistication of the neuroacoustic software that lies underneath the music is incredible.

 

Jim Poole

What do we have in there? We have mathematics. We have a pitch and frequency matrix. We have a binaural signal processing. We have nonlinear oscillating algorithms. We have vibrational patterns. We have a cornucopia of amazingly complex mathematics and software. Why? Because we are designed and expressedly intended to pace your brain, the most sophisticated organ in the history of this planet, to this deep state of alpha and theta. We’re going to do it every single time.

 

Jim Poole

If you had acute EEG on you in NuCalm and you use Rescue 50, at minute 17, we know where your brainwave function is. It’s a 4.0 Hertz, just above deep sleep. At minute 12, we know that you’re at 11 Hertz because we’re stepping you down into theta. At minute 47, we know that you’re at 9 Hertz because we’re bringing you back up. All of this mathematics. That’s why I said earlier NuCalm does the exact same thing to every human being on Earth. It’s just how you interpret the experience, how you respond to relaxation, and how you deal with the journey of liberating your self-conscious and allowing your body and mind to heal. That’s up to you. That’s the personalization of the experience, but the mathematics and the actual experience is identical to every human being on Earth. All right?

 

Jim Poole

So, we have this complex software. Great. You want to know what it sounds like? It sounds awful. It sounds like this. Quite agitating. So, we get the software. We say, “Dr. Holloway, what we’re like is a 50-minute, 5-0 minute process. We’d like a 16-minute down ramp because the central nervous system will not allow us to simply go from beta or alert to stress into theta. That will not happen. So, we have to step you down.”

 

Jim Poole

So, when I said earlier the first several minutes nothing’s really happening, you’re right. It’s not. We have to prepare you for the journey of healing and getting into theta. So, for the first several minutes, we go from 13 Hertz down to 9 Hertz, up to 12 Hertz, down to 11 Hertz, up to 13 Hertz, down to 8 Hertz. It’s the step. Okay? It’s a little game to simply say to your central nervous system, “Everything is safe. Everything is going to be okay,” and at the 16-minute mark, you are on the floor of deep theta. You won’t know that that’s the exact 16 minutes, but if you’re paying attention and you haven’t passed out yet, you’ll feel this big separation. People liking it to getting on an escalator or getting on an elevator and little just going down. All right? That’s theta.

 

Jim Poole

Then you’re in theta on the 50-minute Rescue track. You’re in theta for 30 minutes straight, 30 minutes of the deepest recovery, restoration on a cellular basis your body can absorb. It’s incredible. Incredibly powerful. Then the last four minutes we take you back up. All right? So, each track is meticulously designed for this whole journey. We have the down ramp, we have the theta, and we have the up ramp. All right?

 

Jim Poole

So, there’s a neuroacoustic software platform. Then on top of that, we ask our musical engineer to compose music specifically with the math. He calls this neurosurgery. It takes six to nine months to create a single track. Why is that? There’s a mathematical matrix that we present to him with the raw file, and we say, “At minute one, the pitch is 161 and the frequency is 13.2 Hertz. You have to compose the music using an ancient Solfeggio music scale with the mathematics. So, that’s the specificity of what we’re doing.

 

Jim Poole

Many people have never heard what we do. Why? Because we’re playing in ancient Solfeggio music scales that predate contemporary music. Okay, but also, people are like, “Yeah. I don’t really like environmental sound or something like that.” No. The music is simply to create an enjoyment or distraction. We’re presenting your brain with software. We are pacing your brain like a NASCAR pace car into alpha and theta. You cannot use your own music. You will defeat 80% of the opportunity to get into the healing zone.

 

Jim Poole

Music by itself cannot take you into theta, not now, not ever. It doesn’t work that way. Cortisol, catecholamines in your monkey mind will disallow that. So, the importance of NuCalm is the combination of the biochemistry and the biosignal processing disc, the eye mask, but you have to use the neuroacoustic software. That’s what we’re doing. That’s the whole trick here is to get your brainwave function into that sweet spot.

 

Jim Poole

So, there are three different categories. Okay? There is Recharge, Rescue, and Reboot. Rescue is the coup de grâce. Rescue has everything we’ve ever learned in 30 years of invention, 11 years of being on the market, evaluating this with everybody you can think of from active military to pilots, to cancer patients, to people with multiple sclerosis, to addicts, to veterans, to professional athletes. Everybody we’ve ever looked at, we’re creating the best of the best. Rescue is that category. I personally don’t use other categories that much because if I’m going to spend 30, 40, 50 minutes of my day and sacrifice that time, I want the best the world has to offer, and Rescue is the most sophisticated best neuroacoustic software, physics, algorithms, mathematics, and music ever created on Earth. So, I’m going to go with that.

 

Jim Poole

Rescue 50 is incredible. Rescue 70, 100, 120 and are my favorites. They are specifically designed for this expressed journey, and they literally have everything we’ve ever learned in this. In it is a journey of 70 minutes, 16-minute down ramp, 50 minutes in theta, 50, and then four-minute up ramp.

 

Jim Poole

According to our research with Dr. Chung Kang Peng and Norden Huang, the field’s medal of honor from NASA and the world’s leading statistical biophysicist, it had nothing to do with us. Looking at biophysical measures in HRV, they determined that 20 minutes of NuCalm was equivalent to two hours of restorative sleep, not two hours of sleep, two hours of the most restorative healthy recuperative sleep you can get. This is hugely important. Every minute you’re in theta, your body is restoring at a level you’ll never get to on your own. Period. Maybe some monks get there. We’re not getting there. So, ideally, you’re going to want to use Rescue.

 

Jim Poole

Reboot doesn’t take you into the deepest theta. It actually hovers around the Schumann resonance, which is great and really powerful, and helps with creativity and a sense of calm and inner peace. When you’ve done NuCalm for several weeks to a month, you might want to play with Reboot, but for the most part, early on, when you get NuCalm, stick to Rescue because we have a lifetime of built up stress and poor sleep to deal with and to fix you and to get your autonomic nervous system in balance. Give us that opportunity to get our best to help you be your best.

 

Jim Poole

Recharge, Recharge, Recharge. Recharge was a manifestation of the research that I shared with you. Dr. Peng and Dr. Huang determined that 20 minutes of NuCalm was equivalent to two hours of restorative sleep. In 2017 and 2018, our team went to the Consumer Electronic Show, the largest trade show in the world in Las Vegas. We set up a huge booth. We had 24 NuCalm stations. We NuCalmed 1,847 people in three days, and we’re awarded or won the best of CES. The largest trade show in the world, our small little neuroscience company won with 4,200 vendors and 182,000 attendees.

 

Jim Poole

How did we do that? We don’t have anything marketing dollars. All of our money goes into research and development. How did we do it? It’s simple. We had huge banners and it said, “Get two hours of restorative sleep in 20 minutes with NuCalm. Well, when you’re in Vegas being overstimulated in the Sands Convention Center, the Vegas Convention Center, you’re malnourished, your jet lagged, you’re overstimulated, and you’re hung over, that’s what you want. So, that’s what we did.

 

Jim Poole

What was interesting is we didn’t time people. We didn’t put you on a 20-minute track. We didn’t have one. So, you go in to NuCalm and you get out and you’re like, “Wow! That’s the fastest 20 minutes ever.”

 

Jim Poole

“But it wasn’t. You’re in there for 56 minutes.”

 

Jim Poole

“What?”

 

Jim Poole

So, I remember talking to Dr. Holloway at that meeting. I said, “Doc, this isn’t equating in the human brain,” Okay? We are prone to what we see and what we see, we believe. So, if you tell me, “Two hours of restorative sleep in 20 minutes, why am I in there for 46 minutes?”

 

Jim Poole

I said, “You got to build us a track that’s 20 minutes.”

 

Jim Poole

So, he looked at me and says, “I can’t do that, Jim. There’s no way that the brain will allow me to take you in this accelerated loop down into theta. It just won’t work that way. So, don’t ask me things that we can’t accomplish.”

 

Jim Poole

“Okay. Fine. Yes, you can.”

 

Jim Poole

So, about seven months later, he came to the world with the 20-minute power nap. That’s what we called it. Okay? This is a concentrated version of NuCalm, and should only be used when literally all you have is 20 minutes in a day. 20 minutes is only 170 second of your day. I believe you’ve got more than that to take care of yourself, to balance your autonomic nervous system, to resolve your stress, lower your inflammation, increase your resilience, improve your sleep quality, make you more patient, make you more clearheaded, make you more physically active. I think you have more than 20 minutes in a day to do that.

 

Jim Poole

We built this Recharge track because what we found years ago and David and I and Monica and Erica and our team, we’ve been all over the globe. We’ve NuCalmed thousands upon thousands upon thousands of people. If you say to a stranger, “Hey, do you have 30 minutes? I want to show you NuCalm,” they panic. You can see it in their eyes. They’re like, “I don’t have 30 minutes. I’m way too busy.”

 

Jim Poole

I can’t tell you this psychology works, but if you say to someone, “Do you have 20 minutes?” they always say, “Yes.” So, a lot of this had to do with the nature of being human and thinking that our to-do list is more important than us. All right? We’ve got to get this done as opposed to taking care of us. That is the genesis of the Recharge tracks. It is a concentrated version of NuCalm Rescue to use only when time is constrained. It is not to use as your regular habit because you’re gypping yourself. You’re not getting enough theta, deep restoration in the Recharge track because it’s physiologically impossible. The down ramp is shorter. It’s nine minutes instead of 16, but you’re not going to get enough.

 

Jim Poole

So, use Rescue. I recommend 70, 100, and 120. They are the most incredible, fantastical experiences I’ve ever had and I’ve been using NuCalm on a daily basis for 11 years. You do not need to be in it for the duration of a time period, 70 minutes, 100 minutes, 120 minutes. If I NuCalm for 120 minutes after 11 years of using NuCalm, I’m dying. That’s not a good sign. I’m never going to be in there for two hours. Today, I did NuCalm 70 for 51 minutes. I had no idea where I went. I was in and out of lucid consciousness and just gone. I was exhausted. Okay. Great. I feel great now.

 

Jim Poole

So, use Rescue for the first several weeks to first several months. Get used to when to use it, how to use it, what feels good, what doesn’t feel good. We recommend using it in the primetime. For NuCalm, it’s between 1200 and 400 when your biorhythm naturally takes a cognitive deep, your not thinking as clearly, things start to look a little bit more insurmountable. You might start feeling overwhelmed and lethargic at the same time. That’s NuCalm time.

 

Jim Poole

If you can’t fit it into your schedule, get up a little earlier or just do it in the morning. The difference will be this. In the afternoon when you NuCalm, you’re already hovering it 13-14 Hertz. You’re already slow. We’re just going to take you down and you’re probably going to fall in and out sleep there.

 

Jim Poole

When you do it in the morning, your cortisol level is the highest in the morning of the entire 24-hour biological clock, okay? It needs to wake you up from deep sleep. So, when you do NuCalm in the morning, your cortisol, you’re probably not going to fall back into sleep. If you do, you’re exhausted and you didn’t get enough sleep. For the most part, you’re just going to lie there and enjoy this experience. You’re floating like in a float tank without the water. So, those are the times to do it.

 

Jim Poole

The three categories, Recharge is a concentrated version of Rescue. Reboot is for creativity, feeling calm, inner peace, and stress management, and Rescue is designed to take care of humanity. Period. We built the Rescue 50 tracks expressly for stage IV cancer as we believe in our work and all the stuff we’ve done that it’s the highest profile destress experience for humans. So, that’s how you do NuCalm.

 

David Poole

Excellent. Thank you, Jim. That was a very concentrated 20 minutes. I don’t know if-

 

Jim Poole

Much like NuCalm, you’ll never know how long I speak. I think that’s at least 30-40 minutes.

 

David Poole

All right. So, all joking aside, let’s hustle through these questions. People spent a lot of time and energy submitting questions. We’ll make sure we get to as many as we can. So, let’s start with Heather. “When you don’t reach your natural wake state at the end of a session, what is the recommended time to extend the session? I worry about it making me feel more tired like I’m waking up in the middle of a REM cycle.”

 

Jim Poole

Great question, and I love the fear, worry, and anticipatory anxiety about what can be. Your brain knows exactly what it needs, when it needs, how it needs. You can’t define it. You can’t put a time limit on it, and you certainly can’t set an alarm for it, much like when you eat. You eat, your body gets satiated. You know when you’re done eating. We can’t tell you how long the next piece of NuCalm would be, but what you could do is when you do Rescue 70, 100, 120, you give yourself enough runway. You’re going to reach your natural endpoint.

 

Jim Poole

When you reach your natural endpoint, there’s no opportunity for lethargy or mental fog. It doesn’t exist. Why? Because you’re fully restored. It’s like that little button on a turkey. I have no idea when or why it pops up. It just pops up when it’s done. Okay. That’s the same thing with reaching your natural endpoint. So, if you get done with NuCalm and you’re like, “I’m not ready,” just pick another track and go again.

 

Jim Poole

Ideally, though, and remember this, each track is specifically designed for a down ramp, the healing, and the up ramp. So, if you chose to do, “Hey, I’m going to do 100 minutes. I want to do successive 50 minutes,” don’t do that. Choose the Rescue 100. Why? Because Rescue 100 has a 16-minute down ramp, 80 minutes on the floor, and four minutes up. Two 50 has 16 down, 30, four up, 16 down, 30, four up. So, you’re gypping yourself of the high quality restorative state of brainwave function.

 

Jim Poole

So, don’t be concerned. Don’t worry about it. Your body and brain know exactly what it needs from NuCalm. It will take what it needs. When you’re done, you simply become lucid. You become aware of your surroundings. You may even become bored. That’s when you know, “Hey, I’m done.”

 

Jim Poole

Listen, we know the chemistry. We know the physics. We know the outcome. We know studying the Chicago Black Hawks and stage IV cancer and thousands of people, we know that every minute we’re in theta our body is healing, our longevity is improving, our resilience is improving, our immune strength is improving. We are healing. Every minute we’re not in NuCalm, cortisol is breaking down our cell structure and we are dying. I would love to be in NuCalm for 20 hours a day. You can’t do it. Your brain simply says, “I’m done.” You get up.

 

David Poole

Excellent. Question from Sarah, “The first and third times I did NuCalm, both in the afternoon, I fell asleep briefly toward the end, but the second time, in the early morning after a very poor night of sleep, I didn’t fall asleep at all. My mind was racing all three times. Curious what it means if you don’t fall asleep, what’s your natural setpoint in that case?”

 

Jim Poole

Awesome. NuCalm is not a sleep aid. NuCalm is not designed for you to fall asleep. You should not fall asleep. If you are balanced, if you are in good health homeostatically in balance, you should not fall asleep. Fear not, we’ve done enough research on all walks of life. Every human being we’ve done research on falls asleep. Why is that? We’re levitating you literally just above sleep. So, we’re putting your brainwave function just above sleep.

 

Jim Poole

What we have found is about 10 years and over after puberty, all this cortisol and catecholamines and hormonal dysregulation, the circadian rhythm disruption, and alcohol abuse, and jet lag, and malnourishment, and technology, we’re a mess. We’re all tired. So, everybody dips in and out of sleep. We don’t want you to fall asleep. You may not even think you fell asleep. If you’re NuCalming and your family is around, they’d be like, “Hey, you were snoring for 20 minutes,” and you don’t even know you were asleep.

 

Jim Poole

So, you’re not supposed to fall asleep. If you fall asleep, we can’t help that, but we’ve noticed that when people do fall asleep, they come out of sleep and they pick up in the entrainment and they get back into that theta state.

 

Jim Poole

In the morning, your cortisol level is at the highest. So, if you didn’t sleep well that night, once light comes, stimulates your body, activates, and cortisol starts flushing through your body, good luck trying to fall back to sleep. It doesn’t really work that way. So, that’s normal. So, your experience is exactly what it should be.

 

David Poole

Great. This one is from Ishan. Forgive me, Ishan, if I mispronounced your name. He’s got quite a few questions. He’s a regular user and he’s very curious. “I’m still confused about the difference between Reboot and Rescue.” I think we’ve answered that. “How are they different since there seem to be some overlap in uses?”

 

Jim Poole

Awesome. So, when we designed this, we designed it for a general human, okay? So, from three years old to 103 years old of all walks of life, but we have opportunities to create different outcomes that may eventually become part of a habit. The Reboot is really the Schumann resonance, which is 7.83 Hertz. So, for those of you familiar with Nikola Tesla, the Schumann resonance, some of the cardiovascular literature that showcases the magnetic rotation of the Earth has a balanced approach to our body, our genes, our DNA, et cetera. This is a healthy area for your brain to be in, but it’s not as deep and cellular restorative.

 

Jim Poole

So, there is some overlap. It’s true. Reboot and Rescue, there is some overlap. Both of them are taking you on this pattern, but where Reboot slows down and stays at high theta, Rescue goes into deep theta. This difference, this is Reboot and this is Rescue, okay? So, we definitely recommend using Rescue for most of the time out of the gate, your first several weeks to a month or two. Then feel free to explore Reboot.

 

Jim Poole

Definitely feel free to play with Reboot if you’re in the creative arts, if you’re a writer, a musician, actor, director, et cetera. It’s more on the creative side, less on the healing side. David?

 

David Poole

Sorry about that. I was toggling between mute and my cheat sheet here. These are back with Ishan again. “Rescue has sleep prep listed under it. Does that mean it can be used right before bed? Can NuCalm be used to induce sleep?”

 

Jim Poole

The answer is yes, and the recommendation is no. So, unless you have major sleep issues and a history of insomnia and really on the verge of a cellular breakdown, mental breakdown, emotional breakdown, psychosis, neurosis, sociopathology, don’t use NuCalm as a sleep aid. For the most part, most of us may have poor sleep habits, but we’re not in that place of dangerously poor sleep.

 

Jim Poole

NuCalm, 20 minutes is equivalent to two hours restorative sleep. 20 minutes, two hours restorative sleep. So, if you NuCalmed for 40 minutes, it’s equivalent to four hours of restorative sleep. Why on Earth would I want to take a four-hour power nap before bed? I wouldn’t. I NuCalmed an hour ago. I feel incredible. I will work probably till 1200 or 100 tonight. If I NuCalmed earlier in the day, I’d have less energy, and I’d go to sleep earlier.

 

Jim Poole

So, we do not advise NuCalm as a sleep aid. NuCalm helps improve sleep quality, but it’s not a sleep aid. There are people that we work with who have terminal illnesses or in the 80s and 90s of their life and sleep, literally, they’re sleeping two hours a night. Yes. In that event, contact us and we’ll walk you through some sleep protocols to help you resolve this, and it’s a trial and error because everybody is different, and the complexities of sleep and compromised sleep are incredible. The variables are incredible. So, for the most part, use NuCalm from when you wake up till about 700 at night knowing that when you NuCalmed that night you should sleep better. Okay?

 

David Poole

Back on. “I often don’t fall asleep during NuCalm.” We answered that one. “Sometimes I feel quite sleepy after my NuCalm session. Does that mean I should do a second session?”

 

Jim Poole

Yes, it does. When you get out of NuCalm and you are lethargic after two or three minutes, your body knows what it needs. Period. When you walk into a restaurant, you crave a hamburger, it’s not because the hamburger look good on the menu. Your brain needs protein. Your body knows what it needs. So, if you get out of NuCalm and you’ve had this incredibly deep restorative experience and you’re still mentally lethargic and you want to go back to sleep, go back to sleep. That’s what I would do or go back to NuCalm.

 

Jim Poole

The more you do NuCalm, the more balanced we provide for your autonomic nervous system. The more balanced your autonomic nervous system, the better you manage stress. The better you manage stress, the better you sleep. When we reverse this cycle of high stress, poor sleep, high stress, poor sleep, high stress, poor sleep, we put you in a place of balance, homeostasis and autonomic nervous system survival. Okay?

 

Jim Poole

You’re going to feel good. You’re going to be present. You’re going to have more energy. You’re going to have a different appetite. You’re not going to be stressed. You’re not going to be reaching to things that aren’t good. Your vices won’t call to you as much as they do. There’s a lot of things that are going to happen when you take stress out of the equation, but it takes time.

 

Jim Poole

So, you got to this place in your life through accumulation of stress and substance abuse and whatever it is that we do to get through life. You’re here now. You just got NuCalm. Give it the opportunity. Use it on a regular basis, and it will balance your autonomic nervous system. From there, you use it as you see fit, but if you get it from NuCalm and you’re still lethargic, get back in NuCalm until you’re ready to get up.

 

David Poole

“Is it recommended to simultaneously combine NuCalm with other modalities such as the Polyneuro that might be synergistic. I’m concerned the body could get confused.”

 

Jim Poole

Great question. NuCalm balances the autonomic nervous system, okay? We’re not going to talk a lot of science and validation and methods, but NuCalm was awarded the only patent in the world for maintaining and balancing the health of the human autonomic nervous system, lowering stress, and improving sleep quality without drugs. By virtue of that statement, the 4.5 year patent process and the stamp by the US PTO, there’s not another company in the world that can make that same claim. Nobody does what we do. No one’s proven it, and there’s no 20-year neuroscience companies in the world that can do what we do.

 

Jim Poole

What we do is we lower the stress response. We take the body from this position and we put it to this position. We’ve done over 1,600,000 surgical procedures. When you put the body in this state, everything is more permeable. Why? Because your body is not resisting. You’re not metabolizing through anything. So, you can use NuCalm in conjunction with anything. Just be aware, when you do NuCalm and then you do something like a recreational drug or anything, your body is more permeable. It absorbs more, it will be more powerful. Okay?

 

Jim Poole

You can use this and you can stack it with any other biohack you want. You’re going to find it to be very synergistic. The body does not get confused. All we’re doing is putting the brakes on the sympathetic nervous system and lowering your stress response. We use NuCalm in conjunction with chemotherapy. You need less chemotherapy. We use it with dialysis. You need less dialysis. Why? Because the body is not metabolizing and fighting through the medicament. It’s actually embracing it and creating a more permeable environment for that body to absorb whatever it is you want to absorb.

 

Jim Poole

We do this with psychotherapy. When you are plagued and you have neurosis, sociopathology, psychopathology, whatever it is, nobody likes to go see a stranger and become vulnerable in a chair in a psychotherapist office. There’s a ton of anticipatory anxiety, shame, guilt, all this stuff, all here. When you NuCalm first, it washes all that away. So, you can actually get to your work.

 

Jim Poole

We do a ton of work with physical therapy, chiropractic, and craniosacral therapy. Why? Because when you go in for a massage, by the 50th minute, your brain finally starts to relax and the body relaxes. Well, NuCalm relaxes you at a global motor cortex level. It goes right to the source of the stress and relaxes you. So, if you do this in conjunction, that therapist, whatever it is, can get to the core really quickly. Great question, by the way.

 

David Poole

“Is it recommended to use NuCalm right after a meal when there’s a bit of an energy slump?”

 

Jim Poole

It doesn’t really matter. NuCalm is going to accelerate the rest and digest. So, when you get out from NuCalm, you should probably have to pee almost every time you get out from NuCalm. If you think through physiologically where you’re in parasympathetic dominance, it’s hard to articulate again, but we know when we’re sympathetically driven. That’s most of the time. We know when our mind is racing. We know when our to-do list is bothering us. We know when we feel agitated, overwhelmed, impatient. That’s life. That’s the sympathetic nervous system, but the parasympathetic nervous system is dominant when you’ve ingested too much food and the blood flow goes from the brain to the gut to metabolize and digest the food.

 

Jim Poole

You could double down and do NuCalm after a meal. That’s fine. What you do want to do, though, is if you can drink a glass of electrolytes and create electrophoresis and better electrical stimulation, that’s actually advantageous to the NuCalm experience. I don’t know. To each is own, but this does accelerate the rest and digest side and it will accelerate your digestive issues. We do tell people, we say, “Please use the restroom before you do NuCalm because we are accelerating the rest and digest aspect of your body.”

 

David Poole

“When I’m tired and lethargic in the afternoon, what is the best program to use?”

 

Jim Poole

If you have limited time, do Recharge. If you have maximum time, do Rescue. Period. Typically, I think, our team, we don’t talk about a lot because we’re busy working and saving the world, but I think we all have found our own biorhythm. I use it when I can’t think anymore, when I know that my inefficiencies are plaguing me, when I look at email, I don’t even know how to start this email. Then I know mentally I just need it, and I crave it. I’m like, “Okay. I can’t wait to NuCalm.”

 

Jim Poole

For me, it’s usually in the afternoon, but when I do it, I do Rescue because I want to go the deepest and the fastest. Listen. If it takes me 37 minutes instead of 20, I’m going to take that extra 17 minutes because I learned years ago, if I invest 30 minutes of NuCalm, it repays me with 10, 12, 13 hours of exceptionally clear, productive, positive, mental acuity and physical relaxation. I’m a better human being and I perform better, and it allows me as a tool to perform better. So, take the extra time. Use the Rescue and enjoy the benefit.

 

David Poole

“If I have not slept well and wake up too early, would NuCalm for 120 minutes be a good option to compensate for the sleep I lost?”

 

Jim Poole

We do a ton of work on sleep debt. Everybody, like I said, that we know isn’t managing stress well, and isn’t sleeping well. Listen. We work with monks. Our technology chills monks out. All right? Humanity has a problem when that’s the reality we live in. Okay. So, there’s no judgment here. Nobody is managing stress well. Nobody is sleeping well. The body can never make up sleep debt. It is physiologically impossible, but it is not an impossibility for biochemistry and physics to make up sleep death. So, absolutely.

 

Jim Poole

If you wake up and you don’t get enough sleep, get on NuCalm 40 minutes, 60 minutes. Every 20 minutes is two hours of restorative sleep. This is the aha cathartic moment that a lot of our users have. It’s usually jet lag related. I remember when the Blackhawks went to Sochi, there was five players who went to Sochi for the Winter Olympics. They’ve been using NuCalm for a while. It wasn’t until they got there and in the locker room with the Canadian team and the Swedish, they were the only ones without jet lag. Then they were like, “They called the train on the Blackhawks. This is unbelievable.”

 

Jim Poole

So, it will absolutely augment and make up sleep debt, but here’s the caveat. NuCalm is not designed to replace sleep. You want to get as much sleep as possible. There are many times that we can’t. In the event you can’t, you use NuCalm as an augmentation to make up that sleep debt, absolutely, and it will never let you down.

 

David Poole

Okay. We’re moving on from the novel from Ishan and Charmaine has several questions. “I have just four meditation options that pop up in my app. I thought there were more options than these, but I’m fine with just the four.” She’s referring to the journeys. They’re not meditation options, Charmaine. “Are these curative for me based on the needs, desires that’s specified in my initial survey? Do they change based upon my responses after each sessions? Are the options updated as new material becomes available?”

 

Jim Poole

Awesome. That’s a great question. We are reverse engineering the mass customization and specificity of what we deliver. The reason we’re capturing data from you before and after is we want to understand what tracks on a meta analysis basis people are using and for what purpose, not for the present and to reverse engineer, but for the future. So, we’re always capturing realtime research and data from our user experience to help us with future development. NuCalm doesn’t have to have specificity. It simply needs to put you in the state of healing. You are the unique variable to NuCalm.

 

Jim Poole

Every individual that does NuCalm is a unique variable to NuCalm. You are the only variable. The system itself is static and designed in a cookie cutter. It does the same thing to every human being. The math of Recharge, the math of Reboot, and the math or Rescue is exactly the same. Your brain goes to the same place. How you interpret it, what’s important to you, your stress level, nutrition, anxiety, fear, depression, worry, and sleep, that’s the variable.

 

Jim Poole

So, today, we have hours upon hours, upon hours of the most sophisticated algorithms and neuroacoustic software ever created. It’s a huge library. You’re never going to get bored of it because half the time, you’re in and out of lucid consciousness. You don’t hear half the stuff anyway. In the future, we’re going to take the data that you’re sharing with us in a thousands and thousands and thousands of customer data and the millions of users that we’re seeing and we’re going to use that data to build new outcomes.

 

David Poole

“I intend to fly. Tell me about the use of NuCalm during flights.”

 

Jim Poole

With a plane or she’s going to jump in the air off a building? What’s her intention? She’s going to learn to fly?

 

David Poole

Yeah. I’m guessing you can’t do NuCalm if you’re jumping off a building.

 

Jim Poole

She intends to fly and the question is she wants to use NuCalm for flight?

 

David Poole

During flights, correct.

 

Jim Poole

During flights. Well, I think if you surveyed most of the users that have been using NuCalm for the last 11 years, they will tell you that air travel, jet lag remediation, and just general feeling good despite transcending timezones, that’s a really cool miracle magic element to NuCalm. So, absolutely, you’re going to use NuCalm on a flight. We have a whole travel protocol. It’s really straightforward. We have a jet lag protocol, but you want to use NuCalm in flight for as long as possible.

 

Jim Poole

Do not drink alcohol. Alcohol suspends your brainwave function in alpha. Alcohol creates dehydration. It also impacts jet lag. Drink a lot of water, hydrate, and use NuCalm on your flight, and you will not be disappointed. You’ll feel amazing, and it will help time go by faster.

 

David Poole

Our friend Charmaine also intends to have surgery. So, “Tell me about the use of NuCalm preop and postop.”

 

Jim Poole

Don’t forget peri-op. You can do this during surgery, depends on what the surgery is. So, the preop piece is awesome. Your brain knows you’re having surgery whenever it is. So, say, you’re on the calendar for February 20th. Maybe three weeks before, you start getting anticipatory anxiety, your sleep starts getting compromised. Your central nervous system knows something bad is coming. Okay? It’s designed to protect you.

 

Jim Poole

You want to use NuCalm all the time leading up to it. The more you can slow down cortisol, manage stress, the more you lower inflammation. The more you lower inflammation, the more you lower the cytokine storm and their healing process postsurgery. Also, the more you negate blood and pus and all the body’s natural elements to fight a surgical intervention, you’re going to be in a better place. So, pre-surgery, do it everyday. Postsurgery is it’s a gift from heaven. Do NuCalm everyday. Your surgeons will not believe the healing process. It’s really simple.

 

Jim Poole

There’s a direct relationship between stress and the longevity and complexity of the healing process. When you lower the stress response, you lower the inflammation response. When you lower the inflammation response, you facilitate the rapidity of the healing process.

 

Jim Poole

We do this a ton. I mean, we work with 49 professional sports teams and they’re all surrounded by the best doctors. They all have the best things on the planet. We work with the best athletes in the world. They’re all hurt. They all have contusions. Some of them have concussions, lacerations. They’re always being bumped, bruised, beaten up. NuCalm is a gift to help them heal. It helps them get back to their performance faster. The nagging injuries go away more. The concussive stuff, they heal faster from. It’s all about the healing process and it’s all about managing the stress response.

 

David Poole

Lastly from Charmaine, “Explain the potential impact of stacking a NuCalm experience with microdose psilocybin. Would one attempt these in tandem, follow one experience with the other? Confirm that the combination of these would further enhance and improve the helpful neural pathways that NuCalm seeks to utilize.”

 

Jim Poole

So, Charmaine’s a flyer, she’s a surgical victim, and she’s a psilocybin mushroom adventurist. Recreational drugs and NuCalm have a profound synergistic impact. Never do the recreational drug first then NuCalm. NuCalm will override anything that you do, any caffeine, any methamphetamine. Anything you do, NuCalm will make you straight. NuCalm doesn’t think the biochemical stuff. NuCalm goes right to the brainwave source of your body.

 

Jim Poole

So, NuCalm will override anything you do. However, if you want to create a better experience, a more permeable experience, do NuCalm first then engage in whatever you want to do. Just use less of a dose than you normally would do because the body is more permeable and go on your journey. After you’re done with whatever journey you’re done with and maybe you’re fatigued or maybe your hung over, then do NuCalm. Hangover, specifically from alcohol, is a result of your frontal cortex just being flooded, okay? NuCalm resolves that through oxygen-rich red blood cells pushing it out.

 

Jim Poole

So, there’s lactic acid in your head and all this stuff that creates the headache like a battle ax in your forehead from alcohol. NuCalm helps it goes away. Period. So, NuCalm is awesome for hangovers, and it’s an awesome preamble for whatever kind of adventure you want to go on.

 

David Poole

“Jim, can you explain the Faraday case of biomedical patches are restored and are these protected inside the package even if it’s stored next to my phone, modem, electrical outlet, magnets, et cetera?”

 

Jim Poole

Great question. I love the utilitarian application here. Absolu mal, which is French for absolutely. That Faraday bag is very complex. It looks really simple. It’s not. It’s an antistatic bag with full protection. You keep it in that bag. We’ve seen seven years right now on a longitudinal study of the efficacy. We don’t believe that the software diminishes at all. In that bag, it would probably be in there for 100 years and be safe. You can put it through anything. Okay?

 

Jim Poole

When you take this out of the bag, this is very, very vulnerable. So, if I applied it, I don’t have an accelerometer on here, but if applied on this wrist here and I had an iWatch with an accelerometer and EMS that are pulsing through my body every four seconds, not good. It will erase the signature frequencies on here. If I take the disc and put it against a computer, absolutely not good.

 

Jim Poole

When you measure EMS, computers have some of the most EMS coming out. So, in the bag, absolutely safe, secure, longevity, awesome. Out of the bag, be very careful. Just put it on your wrist you can take your watch, Garmin, WHOOP, whatever you have, diagnostic, you can put it on your right wrist and you do NuCalm. You’re fine. Just don’t be touching it and banging it up against things. So, there you go. Keep it in that bag. It’s awesome, protective. It will take care of the discs.

 

David Poole

Okay. This question, a lot of questions from Megan. “I know how incredible your technology is. I love my NuCalm. I’ve never been able to meditate because I am so sound sensitive that I couldn’t relax. Listening to NuCalm takes the stress out of doing it right. Thank you for that. I’m a mom and feels like the weight of the world on my shoulders. My question to you is knowing how great your technology is, can you develop a program that can help enhance confidence, positive body image, et cetera, a love thyself program?”

 

Jim Poole

You’re doing it. That’s what NuCalm is. So, we often talk. The autonomic nervous system, okay? You have two nervous systems, the central nervous system and the autonomic nervous system. The autonomic nervous system manages your fear, worry, anxiety, depression, and stress. That’s what it does. So, when you are thinking poorly about yourself, it’s a negative consequence and the accumulation of all these network of experiences and your central nervous system has a great memory. It doesn’t like humiliation. It doesn’t like shame. It doesn’t like guilt.

 

Jim Poole

So, it activates these triggers, and it’s a cell sabotage. Okay? We call it the itty-bitty-shitty committee. We all have it. It’s that committee behind our eyes that tells us all the stuff. We don’t look good. We’re shameful. We’re insecure. We’re not going to be well-received. People don’t like us. They don’t trust us. They don’t love us. Whatever that is, it’s all garbage. It’s all the primordial 40-million-year-old reptilian brain sabotaging our ability to activate blood flow here in the frontal and prefrontal cortex where you do love yourself, you do feel confident, you do accept yourself, you’re not judgemental, you are present, you are who you are, accept who you are.

 

Jim Poole

The more you do NuCalm, the more we flush oxygen-rich red blood to the frontal and prefrontal cortex. The more we do that, the more we lessen the grip of the autonomic nervous system. Keep using NuCalm. It is the tool designed to help you with your network of experiences, with that emotional sabotage over the course of time, you will come to a level of acceptance, you will lose judgment, you will lose expectation, and you’ll feel good about who you are today, where you’re going, what you’re doing, and the people around you who choose to be of lower consciousness and judge you and have all these things that are negative, choose your friends and the people around you wisely because not everybody is on this journey with you, but NuCalm is the perfect tool to help elucidate what you do love about yourself.

 

David Poole

This question is from Alan, “For someone who semi-regularly suffers from waking up in the middle of the night and finds it difficult to return to sleep, I am wondering if or how NuCalm can best be used as a return to sleep aid.”

 

Jim Poole

Okay. Once again, it can be done. It is effective. We are reluctant to cast a wide net and say, “Hey, most people do this,” but we do on the side, if you called us up and said, “Hey, give me some guidance,” we’d give you the 15-minute rule. The 15-minute rule is simple. You wake up at 300 in the morning. Your liver is activated. It creates adrenaline. You have to pee. Your prostate is growing, whatever. Okay? You get to pee. Your mind starts, and you sit there perseverating over stuff and then you start getting agitated. Okay.

 

Jim Poole

Maybe you want to put NuCalm on. You don’t need the disc. You don’t need the eye mask. You just need some element to help facilitate the return back to sleep. You can try that. This is a trial and error piece specific to you at this time. It is not designed for that part of your life, but, again, this is a tool. That’s all it is. It’s a tool to help with you, your lifestyle, your biorhythm.

 

Jim Poole

Over the course of time, if I know I’m waking up at 300 and I’m not going back to sleep for seven or eight days in a row, I’m being compromised in my sleep. I’m going to try anything. It’s a good tool, and certainly a better tool than taking a Z drug or some other drug that doesn’t mimic sleep architecture and simply suppresses the central nervous system and knocks you out.

 

Jim Poole

So, stay away from the meds. Those aren’t helpful. Stay away from tech. Do not put any tech on at 300 in the morning because once you activate the blue light, it stimulates your brain, you’re going to lose melatonin and some of the key nutrients you need for sleep. You can try NuCalm and definitely go with the Rescue track and just put it on and see what happens.

 

David Poole

This is from Jeff, “I struggle with sleep issues and low cortisol levels. Does NuCalm increase cortisol or help to lower it? If it lowers it, then is it best to do later in the day?”

 

Jim Poole

Awesome question. So, the cortisol piece is really the adrenals, the thyroid. It’s the whole endocrine system that’s really important here. Chances are, you’ve been sympathetically driven for most of your life and you’ve worn out your gas tank. That happens to a lot of people. We see that a lot, a comorbidity with disease, the terminal disease, high stress, fear, all that stuff, and it just wears down your gas tank. That’s your adrenals.

 

Jim Poole

Low cortisol is typically the result of that. It means it’s hard for you to activate. You’re lethargic mentally and physically, and you’re just exhausted. NuCalm will absolutely help balance the autonomic nervous system and does in turn help restore the endocrine system. We’ve done a lot of work and seen a lot of benefit to balancing the autonomic nervous system, which results in balance in the endocrine system, which puts your adrenals back into play.

 

Jim Poole

So, most people that we see with disease have the comorbidity of adrenal fatigue and, thus, low cortisol, this will help regulate all of that. So, this is a self-regulation tool that helps the ecosystem of your body, which is compensatory in nature. It will help it get back to its normal state and normative functioning. So, yes, this will absolutely help with cortisol, low or high, adrenal fatigue, high or low as well.

 

David Poole

“How should I use NuCalm with workouts? Before or after?”

 

Jim Poole

Both. Before, the strength of oxygenation removing lactic acid, lowering inflammation, increases your endurance, your focus, and your strength. After is when your muscle recovery is so important. So, mentally, physically, you want to have recovery. Maybe allow those endorphins and all the good things that happen with athletic performance. Let it do its thing. Recover first. I wouldn’t get all crazy and then be sweaty and get right in bed.

 

Jim Poole

So, maybe 30 minutes after you perform whatever, but before you workout, probably an hour. We, typically, for professional athletes, we say, “Don’t do NuCalm within the hour window before you want to perform because we want you hypervigilant and we want your adrenals really pumped.” So, maybe anytime an hour before you workout and then probably an hour after you workout, but you can do it twice. There’s no overdoing NuCalm. NuCalm, if you compared it to meditation, there’s no such thing as a meditation injury. There’s no such thing as a NuCalm injury. You cannot overuse NuCalm. It doesn’t work that way. Your body will take what it wants and you’re done when you’re done, but you can use it twice a day, three times a day.

 

David Poole

I’ve got several questions here from Gary, “What is the timing of the NuCalm program for the sleep product?”

 

Jim Poole

Ah. Somebody’s been sniffing around the enterprise because that’s in the hidden vault of goodies. We have a platform. Okay? NuCalm is not the only horse we’re going to ride to save the world, not at all. We have a platform. The physics and the complexity of the platform, we can do anything we want. So, we already have in the mix. We already have a sleep track and the physics behind it. We’ve had it for six years. We’ve been testing it, refining it, and it’s in the vault.

 

Jim Poole

We have Focus, which is 15-20 Hertz. We’ve test it, refine it. We do some work with professional athletes with the Focus track, and we have Ignite Warrior Brain, which is the antithesis of anything relax and drives your brainwave function up into gamma, to 39-40 Hertz, activates your sensory motor rhythm, releases dopamine, it prepares you for performance, battle, whatever that is.

 

Jim Poole

We have all these elements. I think David is the Chief Business Officer, so he’s the person who’s going to tell you the timing, but my understanding is that Ignite will be the next commercial opportunity for you to get access to the neuroacoustic software platform. Sleep is after Ignite.

 

Jim Poole

So, we have a lot going on. We basically restructured and built a direct to consumer product that’s more portable and more affordable over 4.5 years of work and millions of dollars of research. We are now serving thousands upon thousands of people a week instead of 2,000 a year at $5,000. So, we’re focused right now on NuCalm, but behind the scenes in our vault of goodies, we have all these opportunities and we’re constantly testing and retesting, and using them on the military and professional athletes and all these other areas.

 

Jim Poole

Sleep is coming. There’s some work that we need to do to perfect the disc side of the technology, which will probably incorporate L-theanine, melatonin, and gamma aminobutyric acid, but it’s coming, and I don’t know if it will be this calendar year, but it’s coming soon. If not this calendar year, probably by mid 2022.

 

David Poole

Okay. We have some basic housekeeping questions from our customer support team that fielded these questions. “Can one pause the shipment of discs for a certain time but maintain access to the app?”

 

Jim Poole

Through the app, you cannot. Through calling us up and seeking first to understand and figuring this out, yes. I’m sure we can work something out.

 

David Poole

“I would like to be able to see my usage and which tracks I rated best so that I can ensure I use them again.”

 

Jim Poole

That data specificity opportunity transparency is coming. We’ve built out the architecture. Our whole goal in moving from a class III medical device that’s sold for $5,000+ to this monthly and annual subscription was to bring to market a rich catalog, easy-to-use product and get it here. From there, once we had created all the synergy and got this to launch on October 14th 2020, now comes the fun stuff. Now, we get to put money, time, effort, and resources into further expanding the education, handholding the customer journey, making this really user-friendly and really a great tool for you.

 

Jim Poole

So, I think people have identified with the need and desire for data for the quantified self. We’re aware of it. We’ve built the architecture behind the scenes, and it’s in the mix. I know that our development team is already working on this stuff. That’s coming soon.

 

David Poole

Yeah. Just for the audience tonight, you have to start somewhere. We use our mastermind group. We have over 1,000 people who are consumers, not related to the company at all, and we surveyed them intensively the first 90 days of the experience. So, that’s how we built the program we’ve built and launched with, but we’re very eager for customer feedback. We’re very eager to understand what’s the most suitable way to provide an easy stress-free partnership, if you will.

 

David Poole

So, that kind of data, and Monica who’s on this call is going to be doing probably a whole suite of surveys to start understanding the business model and make it more suitable for you. We don’t know.

 

Monica

I was actually just going to say at the end of the call that I’m going to put my email address in the chat, and I would love to hear feedback from people on things they like about the app or don’t like about the app. This is specifically just about the app. That question is about usage necessarily, but what enhancements you would like to see in it, what kind of data you’d like to see. If you have any suggestions, please share that with me. So, I’ll put my email address in the chat at the end of the call.

 

David Poole

Thank you. We’re nearing the end. So, I would do that sooner than later, Monica. Then Erica said that there was a question in the chat about someone who left the disc on all night and when they woke up, there was a rash where the disc is. Jim, can you explain how that may happen?

 

Jim Poole

A rash or just a red mark? So, the rash, everybody’s biochemistry is different. Your skin is the biggest organ on the body. Nutritionally based, a lot of rashes are the response of nutrition. The disc has a 3M hypoallergenic high quality adhesive. We haven’t seen a lot of allergic reactions to it. In fact, probably less than a handful over the course of two years now.

 

Jim Poole

The redness is a result of your body literally sucking the life out of that disc. Your body knows what it needs, when it wants, and when it gets access to GABA. Most humans are deficient in GABA. The autism spectrum Asperger’s is all deficiency in GABA. GABA is the body’s primary inhibitory neurotransmitter that is actually created in your brain, and it’s also extracted from food, but in the last 30-40 years, our food has become less food, thus less balance and more acidic.

 

Jim Poole

So, most of us on this planet are deficient in GABA. When you apply the disc, your body will suck the GABA out of that disc. There are numerous times for all of us, when you do NuCalm for 30, 40, 50 minutes, it’s difficult to get the disc off. Literally, your body is like, “We need this. We understand it. We identify it, and we want it.”

 

Jim Poole

So, if you slept with it, and you had it on for eight or nine hours, we’re taking your body is absorbing a lot of the GABA. I don’t know the profundity of the rash, but I suspect it looks just like a bull’s eyes, and it’s specific to the area that the disc was on. It’s simply the body’s result of working, creating the inflamed response by sucking the life out of the energy that was in that disc.

 

David Poole

Yeah. Please contact us directly. We’re very eager to learn more and, obviously, work with you to help figure this out. Last question and please, if you submitted questions and we didn’t get to it, I want to honor the fact that we’re only 30 minutes past our time that we offered. So, this is from Tom, “Is there any benefit to listening to the tracks without using the disc?”

 

Jim Poole

Absolutely, there is. There’s benefit to any of the three components by themselves. When we entertain the USPTO and went through the process with 4.5 years of evaluating irrefutable, quantified, validated evidence from the best scientists in the world, Dr. Holloway did not invent GABA. The brain did. He didn’t invent an eye mask. He didn’t invest neuroacoustic software. What he invented was a systematic approach designed expressly to create deep cellular restoration and recovery by suspending your brainwave function in theta.

 

Jim Poole

To do that, we’re asking a lot of the technology to manage the human brain. We need all three components. What we showcase in all of our research was that one plus one plus one did not equal three. In NuCalm, one plus one plus one equaled seven. So, the combination of the synergy is exceptionally powerful. However, if you took just the disc by itself, it will have an impact and a contribution to relaxation. If you put the eye mask on, it will have a relaxation response and a contribution to that experience, and if you just listen to the neuroacoustic software, it will have that response.

 

Jim Poole

Combined is NuCalm. Take a part any of the three legs of the stool, it’s a much less efficacious. The disc, remember, is the catalyst to ensure that every time you do NuCalm you have a predictable, safe, fast-acting, deep experience. Without this, we have to override your body’s natural resistance in the form of adrenaline. We don’t know how stressed out you are in day. We don’t know how active your metabolic rate is when you’re stressed out. We don’t know what we have to overcome.

 

Jim Poole

If you look at neural biofeedback and other stimulation opportunities in the therapeutic milieu of helping people, they’ve never been predictable across one person, certainly not across the population, and it’s because they did not take a systematic approach. They took a stimulation approach or a measurement approach. You have to take all three together. That is NuCalm. Without it, you’re not really doing NuCalm, but each element by themselves is a contributor.

 

David Poole

Excellent. Well, let’s wrap it up. Thank you everybody for joining us tonight. Thank you, Jim, for spending so much time and energy and for your brief 20-minute intro. It’s almost 930, and this is recorded. We’ll make it available. Please, by all means, like Monica said, we’re very interested, eager to learn more from each and every one of you. The more you share, the more feedback we get, the better we get, and then we can do this together. Any last words from you, Jim Poole?

 

Jim Poole

Yes. We love what we do. It’s rare in life that you find your purpose that has such a profound impact on humanity. We’re changing the world. Our objective is simple, change the world by changing the energy of the planet from negative to positive. We do that through patently clinically proven neuroscience solutions. We always want to make it easy. We want to make the experience good, but we want to have a profound impact on your ability to balance what humans normally can’t do.

 

Jim Poole

I can’t meditate. If you ask me to meditate or said, “Hey, you’re going to die if you don’t,” then I’m going to die. I can’t do it. I am incapable of doing it. I don’t have any shame about it. I just accept it. NuCalm gives me that power to unplug and to balance me to make me a better me. So, my advice to you is use this tool. Use it, make it a part of who you are. You will notice an incredible change in who you are. You’ll notice that little things that used to amount to big things don’t amount to anything anymore. You’ll notice that you’re present. You’ll notice that the times spent with loved ones is a time of quality observation, listening. You’re there. You’re living your life instead of thinking about the next thing or worrying about the past thing.

 

Jim Poole

Stop with the judgment. Stop with the expectation. These are sabotage elements of a form of humanity that existed millions of years ago, but the frontal cortex and the prefrontal cortex haven’t caught up yet. This tool levels the playing field. It’s a great tool. It’s predictable, safe, and easy, and it’s a tool designed for you to take care of you and allow you to be liberated from stress, and the sky is the limit. When you get rid of the negativity of stress of poor sleep, you do whatever you want to do in life. It’s an honor for us to be here. It’s a privilege for us to be here. We love this. We’ve helped so many people. It’s amazing, rewarding job, obligation, honor, privilege, and we appreciate that you’ve joined the NuCalm family. We hope you share this not only with yourself because your spouse and your children and your parents will notice the difference in you, and it won’t take long. A couple of experiences, you’ll start noticing that your interpreting things that used to stress you out or agitates you and they don’t.

 

Jim Poole

That’s the consciousness of balance in the autonomic nervous system. So, give this gift to yourself and be kind to yourself. We love you, and thanks for being part of the family.

 

Can NuCalm Help You Catch Up On Sleep?

Join David and his brother Jim Poole in a ‘tell-all’ episode about NuCalm, next week on This Is NuCalm!

Jim serves as the president and CEO of Solace LifeSciences Inc., a neuroscience company focused on personalized wellness and performance.

“It’s easy to get amped up during the day, it’s easy to have caffeine or stimulants to amp you up. It’s not so easy to kind of slow yourself down, and people who try to meditate would understand this, it’s really difficult to kind of slow down the monkey mind.”

— Jim Poole

Listen in to this episode of This Is NuCalm to get some insight on the beginnings, recent triumphs and future of NuCalm with none other than the Poole brothers!

Jim Poole, Chairman, President & CEO of Solace LifeSciences, Inc. 

Jim is an accomplished business executive with extensive experience in the healthcare, biotechnology, dental, market research, and IT industries.  Mr. Poole manages the strategic direction and ongoing operations of Solace Lifesciences, Inc., a neuroscience company focused on personalized wellness and performance.  In 2015, Solace Lifesciences, the maker of NuCalm, was granted the world’s sole patent for “Systems and Methods for Balancing and Maintaining the Health of the Human Autonomic Nervous System.”

Mr. Poole has successfully launched global products, managed growth strategies, and effectively optimized business operations for large and small organizations alike.  Prior to joining Solace Lifesciences, Jim co-founded Focused Evolution, a premier global management strategy-consulting firm.  As a Managing Partner, he managed mergers and acquisitions, due diligence, and growth strategies for venture capital and private equity firms.  Under Jim’s leadership, Focused Evolution grew into a multi-million dollar consulting firm, serving a global client portfolio of 49 companies, across a broad in a range of industries.

Jim serves on the board of directors of several medical device firms around the world.  He is a recognized business leader, public speaker, an accomplished author, and has published numerous articles in industry trade journals and lectures all over the world globally on topics including stress, recovery, performance, and business strategy.

A New York state native, Poole earned a BA in psychology from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and an MBA in International Business & Marketing from Babson College.

Dr. Blake Holloway — Inventor of NuCalm — On How and Why it Works

Get ready to have any and all questions answered about the power behind NuCalm!

Inventor of NuCalm, Dr. G. Blake Holloway joins David Poole in this episode of This Is NuCalm. Whether it’s our stress response being equivalent to a fire station or our GABA working like an engine coolant in an automobile, in this episode, Dr. Holloway is straightforward when explaining the organic effects of NuCalm.

 

“GABA is like the engine coolant for your automobile, it keeps the whole system from overheating and the other transmitter sites from going into hyper-arousal.”

— Dr. G. Blake Holloway

 

No matter what you’re looking to improve – stress levels or sleep quality – Dr. G. Blake Holloway is transparent about the best way to utilize NuCalm. Whatever questions you have about the benefits of NuCalm, you’ll get your answers during this episode!

 

Listen to This Is NuCalm on Apple & Spotify!

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway was chief science officer and founder of Solace Lifesciences and inventor of NuCalm. He spent 30 years as a researcher in applied and neuro-psychobiology. From his private clinical naturopathy practices, Holloway helped people nationwide with anxiety, trauma, depression, pain, addiction, and circadian disorders.

 



Key Takeaways

[1:00] David welcomes Dr. Blake Holloway — inventor of NuCalm — and asks him to walk us through who he is and how pathological curiosity led him to where he is today.

 

[8:00] Dr. Holloway shares how AMAs were the original inspiration for the NuCalm device. He also touches on the desperately high relapse rate among alcoholics and drug addicts.

 

[11:00] On the cranial electrotherapy stimulation device that led Dr. Holloway down the GABA path and private clinical research.

 

[14:12] Correlating high anxiety with endogenic levels of certain neurotransmitters was a huge step towards the NuCalm system. Dr. Holloway talks about the three methods he used to evoke brain potential.

 

[21:23] The newest version of NuCalm is what Dr. Holloway calls a quantum jump from what it used to be.

 

[23:50] Dr. Holloways explains what the stress response is at the neurological level as well as how NuCalm helps regulate it.

 

[27:00] Your stress response triggers your immune response. Dr. Blake Holloway explains why this is a problem — and how it relates to COVID-19 deaths.

 

[32:02] Listener question #1: What’s the best way to use NuCalm?

 

[35:24] #2 Why do some people get restless leg syndrome during a session?

 

[38:57] #3 Are there benefits to taking amino acids during a session?

 

[40:12] #4 Are there people for whom NuCalm is not effective?

 

[42:58] #5 What about doing NuCalm in the evenings?

 

[47:56] #6 Is there any research on NuCalm and BiPolar disorder?

 

[50:12] #7 Can you focus on the breath while doing NuCalm?

 

[51:45] David thanks Dr. Blake Holloway for all of his contributions as well as his generosity.

 

Continue on your journey and until next time, breathe deep, relax, and keep looking forward.

 

This is NuCalm, the show for those looking to improve sleep quality, manage stress, and boost recovery. Brought to you by Solace Lifesciences, the makers of NuCalm, the world’s only patented and proven neuroscience technology that works within minutes, without drugs, every time! In over one million medical sessions, NuCalm has helped men and women around the world.

 

NuCalm: stress relief for the way we live today, technology to help you disconnect.


Full Transcript

 

David Poole

Introducing Doctor Blake Holloway, the inventor of NuCalm, and we’re going to have a casual conversation tonight. First I would like to start with Doctor Holloway, could you please tell the group a little bit about your background and what inspired you to take on the life you’ve taken on, honestly.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

A little part of my history. I was born with Asperger’s and didn’t really speak until I was four years old. My mother came in my room one day and under my bed we had an extensive library in a multi-generational family home, that probably had 3000 to 4000 books in it. So she looks under my bed and finds all these encyclopedias and reference books, and she asked me, “What are you doing with all those books under your bed?” I said, “I’m reading them,” and my mother passed out. But we had a discussion later, why I wasn’t speaking. I don’t exactly know other than the fact that I taught… after I taught myself to read, I guess I thought I could speak. So those were some formative events that I think shaped me.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

And the other is just something that I was born with, which is… I don’t have any other term for it, other than an absolute pathological curiosity. I was the child you never wanted to leave at home alone because your radios and other appliances might not have been reassembled quite as well as I disassembled them initially. So if I was ever left at home I had to swear a promise that I would not disassemble electronics and reassemble into something that I thought was better. So I think those are a bit of the sort of formative things in my life that led to that. I still have a pathological curiosity, and I have a real annoyance with academic institutions that very much become, in the publisher parish, world or otherwise, becomes like petty, dysfunctional families that have fought inter-generationally.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

I don’t do well in those environments, and if you look at the way various disciplines work in academic environments, there’s a lot of siloing. People are kind of up in their own individual tower, and what I’ve always been driven to do is to look outside of the boxes of my particular disciplines, that there are things to learn from other disciplines also. So I think because of this really intense drive of curiosity I have, I’m oftentimes parsing the research and going through the research of a lot of other disciplines, and when you do that, you start to see how systems and disciplines have very similar operations to them.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

When you start thinking operationally and particularly when you start thinking in terms of quantum mechanics or something, you start to see that there’s more universality among various disciplines than there is a lack of them. So that has been a driving principle for my life. The initial inspirations for NuCalm come out of my background of applied psychobiology and certainly my background of neuroscience, and then also my background in functional medicine. And when you merge those together and start looking through one lens into a content package of another discipline, you really start to view things in a bit of a different way.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So you go, if this principle works in this particular discipline, what happens if we applied that same principle to another discipline, and then all of a sudden you have novel correspondences or you’ve really discovered a principle that in itself, while it’s not innate, it’s there in that particular discipline. I think those particular imprints on me, the historical imprints, some of the genetic imprints and otherwise, are an awful lot of what directs my life, yet today and particularly the way that I approach the field of research.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

One thing we don’t often crow about as a company, but we’re the first company that did translational neuroscience. Translational neuroscience… if you know about translational medicine, all the research in the world is just fine, but if you cannot conduct that research into something that benefits a patient at bedside or chairside, you really don’t have a lot that’s useful. Now, the human genome project took several decades, and now out of all that research, we didn’t really understand it when we first captured all of the genome and otherwise. Now that we understand why, we’re able to take that body of knowledge and we’re able to create molecular medicine that changes some of the misspelled genetic code.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So that’s an illustration of a very powerful application of when the research started… they didn’t even have… the tools were not present to be able to complete a research project that large. So I think that is maybe enough of a orientation of where I’m coming from. Dave, do you want to conduct some questions to me?

 

David Poole

Yes, sure. Yeah, please, Dr Holloway. What was the problem statement? What was the challenge you faced in your clinical practice that inspired you to even think of a solution or try and develop a solution like NuCalm?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Well, I was working in the addictive disease field. I was the executive director of one of the most elite alcohol and drug treatment centers in the country. And one of the real problems, if you’re around the treatment community for very long, are AMAs. Those are people that check themselves into treatment and then they leave four or five days later. AMA means they’re leaving the treatment center against medical advice. However, unless a person is adjudicated incompetent, you can’t keep them there, even if it’s in their interest to be there. One of the dirty little secrets about alcohol and drug abuse treatment is that there is still a profoundly high relapse rate, and one of the problems with this high relapse rate is that there are high numbers… I don’t think this should come as a surprise to anyone. That there are high numbers of drug addicts and alcoholics who have comorbid anxiety disorders.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Now when those people present to treatment, and they begin to detox off whatever their beverage or drugs of choice were, they start to get extremely increased anxiety signaling. And these people are poorly parsed out in intake process. Almost everyone in a treatment center will sit with the psychologist in the intake process, and a primary addiction therapist in the intake process, and once these particular patients start to detox, they’ll come up to nursing and want medication. They will be accused of being drug seeking, and anxiety is the number one trigger for relapse in addictive diseases. You don’t ever see a relapse unless there is a lot of anxiety promoting circumstances and anxiety in the treatment individuals themselves.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

There was a woman in England who was treating a lot of the metal bands successfully for addiction, and she was using a form of cranial electrotherapy stimulation, which is a mild brain stimulation out of a little black box, about the size of a pack of cigarettes. I was familiar with this technology as I spent considerable time at the Pablo Institute in Leningrad, which has changed back to its original name. But I saw that technology. It was invented by Russians. And I took an interest in that technology and started experimenting around it with some private addiction patients that I had. I got some fairly nice results in the experimentation, but not anything that you would want to say, “Here’s the silver bullet for it.”

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

I worked another three years looking at combinations and otherwise, and since I’m particularly interested in the neurotransmitter system within the brain, we knew that one of the principles that made cranial electrotherapy stimulation worked so well for addiction is because it caused a purging of all your neurotransmitters, and then they come back into the neurotransmitter sites in a better state of balance. But I knew enough about biological chemistry of the brain to know you have to have certain raw materials, and these are certain amino acids that are the precursors to your neurotransmitters. GABA is a precursor transmitter to your GABA neurotransmitter. Tyrosine is a precursor amino acid to your dopamine neurotransmitter, and 5-Hydroxytryptophan is a converted amino acid that’s the precursor to your serotonin neurotransmitter. And then inositol tyrosine to your norepinephrine neurotransmitter.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So your neurotransmitters, and there are a couple of broad categories. Catecholamines that are excitatory, and then monoamine, which are inhibitory. So serotonin is an inhibitory neurotransmitter, dopamine is an excitatory neurotransmitter. When you have addiction problems, you’re producing a hyper amount of dopamine, which is a pleasure reward chemical, and that’s what keeps you in a loop. It’s not the alcohol or the other things that make you high. It’s the hyper release of dopamine from the ventral tegmental area of the brain.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

A lab test came out of Germany that made it possible for the first time to look at the body base level of neurotransmitters through looking at organic cations transmitters. Organic cations are the electrical carts that deliver your neurotransmitters to the transmitter sites that they are involved in. So I had the capacity to measure where people’s neurotransmitters were, and when we would take particularly anxiety patients and I would take addiction patients with high anxiety test metrics and we would… There was a particular state I would look at, where the test came back on a lot of anxiety patients, and there were two very opposite polarity conditions involved.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

One would be we would find in an anxious person, an extremely high level of GABA. Well, if they had high levels of GABA, theoretically they should not be having anxiety. GABA is like the engine coolant for your automobile. It keeps the whole system from overheating, and keeps your other transmitter sites from going into hyper-arousal, which is like what will cause seizure disorders. I’ve started doing some testing, and we would find these really strange opposite conditions. That is to say, you would find highly anxious people with some very high amounts of GABA and/or almost no GABA whatsoever. So I sorted this group of high GABA patients out that were still having lots and lots of anxiety, and I exposed them to particular… I built my own cranial electrotherapy stimulator on my electrics bench, and I exposed the patients that took pre-lab samples and then post-lab samples.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

And low and behold, after exposing the individuals that had high levels of GABA, which means those levels of GABA were outside the receptor sites, they weren’t inside the receptor sites, we would get a record back and you wouldn’t see the GABA there. And then when we gave augmenting amino acids to people that showed no GABA there and we would apply cranial electrotherapy stimulation, we would find that their neurotransmitter levels would go up pretty precipitously. So those were two of the basic investigations that I started of something that became the NuCalm system.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

And out of particular interest in another way to evoke potentials in the brain… the electrotherapy stimulator is one. Amino acids supplementation was another. And a third method that we looked at for evoking potentials, for putting the brain into specific electrical frequency ranges, was binaural sound. And we went through individual testing, looking at that, and then when we combined the binaural sound with amino acid supplementation, with cranial electrotherapy stimulation, we got a quantum effect in the increase of the efficacy. And it was at that point that we could actually see that we were affecting a shift in heart rate variability, placing the autonomic nervous system into parasympathetic dominance, which is the restorative state of the autonomic nervous system, where all sorts of androgen balance and body repair and cellular repair take place in that particular set of evoked potentials.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

And then we got a simple achieving, sort of cheat method that I’d arrived out of my [inaudible 001951] readings of brains, which are called quantitative EEGs. If you block light to the eyes, the suprachiasmatic cells and the hypothalamus send different messaging to the back of the brain. The posterior portion of your brain is part of the portion of the brain that creates the pictures. Your eyes do not create pictures. Your brain creates the pictures, visual pictures, you say you see with your eyes. Your eyes only collect light. When you block light from the eyes with a light-blocking mask, you will automatically in just a couple of minutes put the rear portion of the brain into alpha state dominance. It will immediately go into an alpha state.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So you get a 30% jump in the brain without doing anything, just by blocking the light that comes in through the eyes. And when you combine all four of these basic systems, amino acid augmentation, cranial electrotherapy, stimulation, light blocking mask, neuroacoustic sound files, you have a very stable four-legged bench to rest upon and have your important communication systems in your central nervous system, autonomic nervous system and peripheral nervous systems and otherwise go into homeostasis, which is a preferable balance. And that’s kind of the story of the evolution of NuCalm.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

And the new version of NuCalm has quantum jumped in our technology because we have condensed the footprint size of the system into something that’s much easier to use and produces a more robust effect, and that has been achieved through our bioresonance disc of platform and advances in acoustic evocation of specific frequency brain states, through our neuroacoustic programs. We have specialty intellectual property and patents on… we evoked a new methodology that’s much more sophisticated than binaural sound. We still deliver the sound files in alternating between the left and the right ears. However, the method by which we achieved that is proprietary and based on nonlinear dynamics of quantum mechanics and oscillating the sound files in an oscillatory, vibratory pattern, that the brain will continue to listen to.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

On standard binaural files, the brain usually becomes bored within five or 10 minutes, and won’t keep following the instruction of those sounds to evoke certain potentials. And we overcome that problem, and when you look at our QEEGs, our heart rate variability measures today, we’re able to bring them up into ranges that we had never been able to achieve totally with our previous system. So it also is easier to ship and much easier for the end consumer to apply, much easier to travel with. Dave, any more questions coming up in our pocket? Do I need to detail this out anymore?

 

David Poole

I was just going to suggest, if you could, to make it a little more relatable, could you just talk quickly about the human stress response? What happens neuro chemically and how NuCalm interrupts that in the organic way it does?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Yeah. Well, one thing, remember that I said that one of the big systems that have evidence that we can regulate it is the GABA [inaudible 002507] system. Like I say, a good way to conceive of the GABA system in the brain, and the serotonin system in the brain, is that they’re inhibitory. I often call them the engine coolant. You need an engine coolant, particularly in the summer. You need an antifreeze in the winter. And you need to have those operating at the right levels. What’s happening in the human stress response is that the human stress response is part of our survival response, and the human survival response depends very, very much upon being able to assess levels of danger.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So if you’re a low level of danger, you might just have something that’s called generalized anxiety disorder, and that means you just kind of worry a little bit about everything a little bit almost all the time. That’s a generalized anxiety disorder. It used to be called neurosis, which is just a fancy thing of saying things that make you have concern or make you nervous. But what happens in the body, when you start having sustained stress responses, is that you, like in a city when a fire alarm goes off the fire department dispatches equipment to put that fire out, when your body’s threat response goes off, one of the primary systems that is triggered is something called the HPA axis.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

It’s a triangle. The hypothalamus and the pituitary are in the head space in the brain, and then the adrenals are like little English postdoctorate graduation caps that you wear for your graduation, that sit on top of the kidneys, and they produce a number of complex stress hormones that when triggered by the hypothalamus sends a signal to the front of the pituitary and that sends a chemical signal to the adrenal glands, which release norepinephrine, epinephrine, you call it adrenaline, and a cascade of dopamine, a cascade of other stress chemicals, which start to trigger the immunity response.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

The immunity response in the human body is one of the first responses that is triggered for like a virus or a bacterial or otherwise. But what happens when stress starts to trigger the HPA response is the immune system starts sending out all of its targeting capacity to find is there a bacterial infection, is there a viral infection, and then it, to use the military term, painting, it paints that invader. You know when they send military out to paint a building for targeting for missiles or otherwise, they use laser-tagging and they call it painting. They paint the target, and then the software can read the target more accurately and put the drone or the smart bomb down, or the guided bomb from a plane down.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

In the same way, the human immune system has to paint targets, and it usually uses antibodies to do this. But if it cannot find something that is paintable, it will like a fire department… they may send out one truck, and then if the fire goes to two alarms, they’re going to send out another piece of equipment, or if they determine that there are toxic chemicals in the building, they’ll bring other chemicals that can smother the oxygen from the fire base. So your immune system works very much. But for every case where the immune system cannot target an invader, it will start to unleash massive amounts and primarily massive amounts of inflammatory chemicals.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So when you look at the respiratory viruses that people die from, the common flu and now we have what’s called corona 19, it’s really not the virus that does the killing. It’s the cytokine storm that is triggered by the immune system. If you have a weak immune system, you’re at a disadvantage. You can also be at a disadvantage if you have a highly strong immune system. If you remember when the MERS and SARS and H1N1 virus came about, lots of younger people died from that virus because they had really strong robust immune systems, and their immune system would go into a cytokine storm.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

The system that NuCalm now is able to communicate to and bring into balance is like cranial nerve 10, which is the vagus nerve, which is the master way that the autonomic nervous system operates and sends its messaging out through. So we can now balance the vagus nerve better. Now the things that our cranial electric stimulator went out to operate on, all of that operation is now carried by the bioresonance disc. The cranial electrotherapy stimulator was helping the ligand gates, these are the receptor sites for amino acids to go in to be created into a neurotransmitter, and now we’re able to directly modulate the organic cation transport carts. These are the little electrical carts that take the neurotransmitter into the brain, and we’re able to up regulate those with the bioresonance disc without having to use the cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

We also were able to create the molecular analogs for all of the amino acids that were in our amino acid cream or tablets, and those are also carried and those frequencies are delivered into the brain through the bioresonance disc. And we have many other modulating signals that help bring about homeostasis into the vagus system, and also into balancing the hypothalamus before it fires off the top signal in the HPA triangle.

 

David Poole

Thank you, Blake. Listen, we’ve got a couple of questions. We’ve got one from Mathu, that’s what’s the best way for us to use NuCalm?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Well, one of the ways I think that’s really useful for using NuCalm is to… if you’ve been a meditator or mindfulness person or anything, set your clock 45 minutes before everyone else gets up in the house, and set your day with doing a NuCalm restore… one of the restore files. I don’t have a particular special file. It depends on the thing, but the Restore 2 is a really robust restoration file. And that gets you going for the thing. Your highest level of cortisol in the mornings starts early in the AM and peaks up around 600 to 700, something like that. That’s why if you look at heart attack, mortality rates, the early morning is one of the biggest areas in which people have fatal heart attacks, because they already have heart issues, and they’re pumping a lot of cortisol that’s running the heart at dysrhythmias that are not good for it.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So I think doing the NuCalm to get you in the right level of tuning to start your day, and then if you have afternoon [inaudible 003530], do a 10 minute power nap, that we have as selections, and that’s just across the board thing that could do something for everyone. That algorithm is a good algorithm through the day.

 

David Poole

Excellent, thank you Blake. We’ve got another question about the disc, and I think we should do a separate conversation entirely. It’s a very complex subject matter.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Mm-hmm.

 

David Poole

So I think maybe next week, same time, we’ll spend a considerable amount of time on that one.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Yeah. And we will be able to give you analogs and other things. We will not be able to give you any technical trade secrets that leave insights to this. It took me five years of development to get this. It was challenging, it was exciting. It’s possibly the most frustrating number of negative results that I ever got, and only in the last year and a half did we start getting… we would get what I think were more like false positives, but we did get it together and it still stands up, and it has really energized what people, I think, know about our company. But yeah, we can spend additional time on the disc if you want to do that.

 

David Poole

Yeah, got a couple more questions here. One from Pablo, why do you get anxiety while using the system? I’ve gotten it once. You get like restless legs, not exactly anxiety. I could not go through the entire track.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

I don’t know if he has restless leg syndrome. Sometimes people, if their restless leg syndrome is a part of the sleep disorder, and if your dopamine is on the edge of not being quite right, and you have that, you could actually drop into a place in low beta, like on one of our restore files, and you would actually get that restless leg, because you had actually dropped into the sleep zone. Now-

 

David Poole

What about the anxiety piece? We’ve certainly seen this over the course of 10 years. Sometimes the first few exposures to NuCalm can trigger what seems to be…

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

That is true. There’s an interesting thing called a laterality disorder. The part of your brain that connects to right and left hemispheres is called the corpus callosum, and it’s a big bridge. It’s actually thicker in women than it is in men. That’s why I always advise that you’re going to have life and death decisions made on a panel, make sure you have some women there, because they have a little bit of the bridge advantage in processing information across the corpus callosum. But you have a laterality disorder, things that should work one way in your body will work in another. For example, let’s say you have a laterality disorder and you drink a cup of coffee and you get really sleepy and want a nap. Well, that’s a paradoxical effect. Non-decaf coffee should make you feel more aroused. It should not make you feel sleepy.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So generally, people with laterality disorders will have an opposite effect to some things. That being said, because of the way NuCalm works, once your brain gets some training, that laterality will begin to abate, because I have frequencies in the neuroacoustic software to help those laterality issues be modulated in a more positive direction. People that have laterality disorders are the biggest group of people that have a real low tolerance to toxicities. There are actually communities around the United States where people that have what we call these environmental illnesses, they park their car at the road and electric golf cart takes them down to their house. I haven’t found all that many people that if they will stick with NuCalm, that will usually come to pass. I would particularly recommend that individual using the NuCalm Pro part of the bio disc.

 

David Poole

Got you. Another question, Dr Holloway, from Carla. Any benefits in taking essential amino acids during a session?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

No. The essential amino acids that you need for the session are encoded in the bioresonance disc. So all of the amino acids that were in the original version of NuCalm, your GABA, your tyrosine, your magnesium, your other [inaudible 004155], amino acid, those are all in there. So you will not be in there at a sustained delivery level immediately to the brain, so you would not be achieving any advantage to orally supplement with amino acids, because we have them there in all the correct balanced ratios, and we have them there in a more powerful form than was actually present in the cream and the tablets.

 

David Poole

Thank you, Blake. Question from George. Are there people for whom NuCalm is not effective?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

There are some genes that people have, either you can… there’s some, you can actually have a genetic misspelling that makes it difficult for you not to be anxious. However, I’ve not done broad broad genetic tests. I’ve done enough genetic tests with some anxious people with those genetic misspellings, and once you can get the GABA in the receptive site of even people with that genetic misspelling. Now, that being said, if you were an unlucky genetic card of the draw person, there are four different genes, if memory gets me correctly, four different genes that could put you in a real difficult period of time. One of those would be for the GABA receptor gene, which I have the organic cation transport mechanism for that, up regulated pretty high up.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

But if that person, to answer the question, if that person had all of the genetic misspellings, that would be a difficult case to manage. But right now, we do have some people when they start with NuCalm, it may take them a couple of weeks to come in to balance. But it’s a pretty rare occasion that people don’t do that. I won’t say that there aren’t occasions where there will be people that won’t do so well, because there’s a wide variance among genetics. But we’ve worked on this for well over two decades now and continue to evolve the platform, and every time we evolve the platform, we get better solutions to more people for what we’re trying to drive forward in people for their wellness and wellbeing.

 

David Poole

Yeah. Dr Holloway, another question from Kim Hirsh. How does using NuCalm in the evening work? Is there a better track that will give you rest but not prevent you from going to sleep? Or how about a routine prior to going to sleep to get better sleep?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

You certainly, in my book, you don’t want to use NuCalm after 400 PM. Your body starts doing a lot of things to prepare you for sleep. Your best algorithm if you’re not doing it is to… you can make up about two hours or a little more in lost sleep with a power nap. With a 10 minute power lap you can restore… It’s almost impossible to restore a sleep deficit, but we have some metrics that certainly indicate that you can restore some lost sleep with that. The biggest thing you need to watch in the evenings with NuCalm and stuff is keep your bright blue light exposure down as much as you can. Blue light from LED lights and everything signals to your eyes and to your hypothalamus that it’s high noon, and that means your melatonin will not bind to your serotonin. So-

 

David Poole

So, Dr Holloway, if you have a sleep disorder and the moment of truth, going to bed every night, causes some anxiety, and is obviously going to disrupt your sleep, and you were going to use NuCalm to really feather the nest and make you more available for sleep, what track would you recommend?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Well, I think probably one of the restore tracks. Now I have some shift workers of probably… I have quite a few nurses. For seem reason, I have nurses in my functional medicine practice. But I think it’s because I’ve trained a lot of nurses in EEG work and for their bio feedback certification in EEG. But shift workers can use NuCalm a little bit differently than non-shift workers do, and with shift workers, I have had them use a whole restore track or something when they come into get themselves de-linked from work because you usually can’t just stride home from work and get into bed. That, I give a little bit different advice, and then in people that are not shift workers.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

I haven’t found it effective to use the longer-term file late in the day for people that are insomniacs or not sleeping well. You’re better to start tuning your body in the morning, and over a period of time that will catch up to… because it has to train your brain. I tell people if you’re going to catch the sleep train, you have to be in the right departure lounge. And that right departure lounge is a narrow range of electrical frequency in the brain. NuCalm’s not always a single silver bullet, an immediate event. It’s a little bit like plowing a field before planting. You plow the planting rows and get them in good shape. You then drop the seeds in and rake the dirt back over the seed, and then something begins to happen.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So it’s important to understand that NuCalm is also a teaching tool for the brain to entrain the brain, guide the brain just like you would guide a plane up to the jet way. There’s a fellow on the ground with two bright orange reflective paddles, leading the airplane up to the jet way. So if you can’t get in the right departure lounge, or get off in the right departure lounge, you’re not going to get to the destination. So one of the things NuCalm is doing is it’s a device that evokes potentials, and then trains those potentials so they become the preferable pathways in the brain and the nervous system.

 

David Poole

Got you. Dr Holloway, two more questions, and then we’ll break for the night. One, is there any research on NuCalm with bipolar disorder?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

No, we had an article published last year in the Journal of Anxiety and Depression that was done by Dr Ileo Conte at the University of Rome. He is one of the leading bio-signaling specialists using advanced quantum math to pick out. He did an article that was published in the journal of anxiety and depression. I think I have seen… I’ve not seen bipolar depression remitted with NuCalm. I have certainly seen it augment to lower the arousal rate, because once again, the autonomic nervous system goes into sympathetic dominance, which is your fight or flight response.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

I will also say this. There are lots of people, particularly women, that have bipolar disorder… they actually have post-traumatic stress disorder, and it’s misdiagnosed, because when you start looking at an EEG that is going into seizure, it’s real easy to misread that. Unless you’re extremely skillful, you can misread that as bipolar. And sometimes some people even use gabapentin which is a seizure medication that up-regulates the GABA potential in the GABA receptor sites. So you will find that. I’ve seen it augment it. We’ve not done an exclusive study. There are a lot of different ranges in bipolar, so that’s of the reasons it makes it rather difficult.

 

David Poole

Okay, last question from Ross. I occasionally find myself running through my head for the whole 50 minutes. Is it counterintuitive to try to focus on the breath or something similar in order to quiet down?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

No, it’s absolutely intuitive. One of the things is to shift the placement of your attention, and shifting the placement of your attention is… well, it’s one of the things that’s used in medical hypnosis. Now, I’m talking about a depth of hypnosis where you could rearrange the bones in a person’s hand surgically under medical hypnosis, not anesthesia. There’s not a concrete separate evidence on the bipolar thing, but the systems that we are able to manage would certainly… Some bipolars absolutely I think I the reticular activating system, that’s your sleep cycle. Your reticular system calms down in the evening to go to sleep. It arouses in the morning to wake you up. If you have narcolepsy your reticular system is out of order because it doesn’t stay tonified at one level. It falls out of tone when you’re not expecting it.

 

David Poole

All right folks, well that’s a wrap. A lot of great questions, a lot of great engagement. Thank you, Dr Holloway, for many things.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

You’re welcome.

 

David Poole

NuCalm of course, but the continued pursuit of excellence and efficiency. The next time we talk, we’ll focus a lot on the bio-signal processing disc. It’s a huge curiosity factor. It’s a very fascinating science. It’s very complex too. But also on some of the other therapies and modalities you’ve been involved in over the last 10 years that are quite interesting.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Sure.

 

David Poole

We’ll make this available for download, and keep on NuCalming everybody. Have a great evening.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Okay, yeah. Thanks for being part of our explorer team.

 

David Poole

Indeed. Cheers.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Thank you.

 

Can NuCalm Help Regulate Your Stress Levels?

You won’t want to miss next week’s episode of This Is NuCalm.

Founder of Solace Lifesciences and inventor of NuCalm, Dr. G. Blake Holloway joins David Poole in an exciting discussion sharing how our brains work on NuCalm.

 

“GABA is like the engine coolant for your automobile, it keeps the whole system from overheating and the other transmitter sites from going into hyper-arousal.”

— Dr. Blake Holloway

 

Listen in on this treasure trove of scientific knowledge on how and why NuCalm optimizes neurotransmitter function. This is an episode you’ll want to have pen and paper for!

 

More About Dr. G. Blake Holloway, Inventor of NuCalm

Dr. Blake Holloway was chief science officer and founder of Solace Lifesciences and inventor of NuCalm. He spent 30 years as a researcher in applied and neuro-psychobiology. From his private clinical naturopathy practices, Holloway helped people nationwide with anxiety, trauma, depression, pain, addiction, and circadian disorders.

 

 

 

Can Disorders be Heard? With Henry O’Connell

Henry O’Connell, Founder and CEO of Canary Speech joins guest-host Erica Robinson from Solace LifeSciences, Inc. to talk about how the Canary Speech app uses AI and machine learning to provide 200 thousand data points to analyze stress levels in speech patterns.

 

“When you’re looking at 200,000 data points, you can be more accurate, you can be more specific. We can tell the severity of someone’s stress in the morning and after doing a meditation or an event where they’re calming themselves. After they go walking or after they exercise, they can measure again and see the impact of that in their lives.”

— Henry O’Connell

 

Ever thought three minutes of light conversation could give you that much information?

Tune in and get ready to take notes.

 

Listen to This Is NuCalm on Apple & Spotify!

 

Henry O’Connell has over 20 years of executive and C-level experience. Following graduate school, O’Connell began his career at the National Institutes of Health in a neurological disease group and continued on to a successful business career specializing in turnaround situations in the tech industry.

 



Key Takeaways

[1:00] David welcomes Henry O’Connell as well as today’s guest host, Erica Robinson. Erica starts off the conversation with a question on the origins of Canary Speech.

 

[4:00] What are the underlying speech markers of the human condition? Henry speaks to the features that the Canary Speech app provides.

 

[5:00] There are multiple speech recognition software apps available, however, Henry offers a few critical reasons why their app differs and how it makes it much more performant — regardless of the spoken language.

 

[7:53] AI training for the Canary Speech algorithm was enabled through a multitude of clinical and pharma studies and resulted in models that are aligned with industry standards. Henry shares some of the research they did as well as the results they generated

 

[10:00] Whether for your own baseline or as a community comparison tool, Canary Speech’s scores can serve as a tool to monitor your overall sympathetic health.

 

[11:13] Henry talks about Canary Speech performance as compared to the usual methods (cortisol, saliva testing, HRV, etc.)

 

[14:16] What studies are currently being done in the mental health field with Canary Speech? Henry shares how they are trying to identify mental illness comorbidities as vectors of health improvement.

 

[19:35] Henry shares some personal examples of using the app and how it has impacted his own life experience.

 

[23:15] Canary Speech’s newest projects and opportunities!

 

[27:17] Henry shares what the last book he read was: check out Glenn Beck.

 

[28:38] Erica thanks Henry for sharing his knowledge and app with the mastermind and invites listeners to keep an ear out for a Q&A episode with Henry in the future.

 

Continue on your journey and until next time, breathe deep, relax, and keep looking forward.

 

Mentioned in this episode

NuCalm

Canary Speech

Author: Glenn Beck

 

This is NuCalm, the show for those looking to improve sleep quality, manage stress, and boost recovery. Brought to you by Solace Lifesciences, the makers of NuCalm, the world’s only patented and proven neuroscience technology that works within minutes, without drugs, every time! In over one million medical sessions, NuCalm has helped men and women around the world.

 

NuCalm: stress relief for the way we live today, technology to help you disconnect.


Full Transcript

David Poole
This is David Poole with Solace Lifesciences. I’m here with Henry O’Connell, the CEO and President of Canary Speech, and Erica Robinson who runs our Research Department and heads up the Mastermind Project for Solace. And we’re going to speak to Henry today about the Canary Speech App. How he got involved in the business, why his tech is so powerful and potent and best in class, and then how he uses it. And then we expect to use it as the embedded technology in the NuCalm platform to analyze stress and rests. Erica is going to be leading the questions and Henry’s got all the knowledge we want.

Erica Robinson
We’re happy to have you. Thanks for starting us off, David. I think a good place to start, Henry, would be, could you just tell us a little bit about the history of Canary Speech, how it all came about, how long the company’s been around and the technology? Just to give us a little bit of an overview.

Henry O’Connell
Sure. Thank you. So the company was founded about five years ago by a very good friend of mine, Jeff Adams and I, founded the company. Jeff and I met nearly 30 years ago. I was at the National Institutes of Health as a Researcher in Neurology. Our group specifically studied neurological diseases and Jeff Adams, had a much cooler job, he was at our NSA, our spy group, where he did decoding of encrypted messages during the cold war. He’s a mathematician by training. From there, after I left NIH, we both were at NIH and the NSA for about five years.

Henry O’Connell
I left and went on into technology companies and Jeff left and went on into a career of speech and language. Jeff Adams, my business partner, is responsible for most of the major advancements in speech and language. He is so well-known that when Amazon was seeking to build the Alexa, the Echo Project, they simply bought the company Jeff was in, and Jeff then led the team at Amazon that three years later launched the Amazon Echo. Along with that was the patent lawyer, Jeff O’Neill and 17 of his speech and language scientists at that company, when they concluded that work about five years ago, Jeff and I formed Canary Speech.

Henry O’Connell
Jeff O’Neill, the patent lawyer, Jeff Adams, myself, and the core group of speech and language scientists came together to create a new generation of speech analysis for human condition and disease. We had been awarded five patents, two in Europe and three in the US, we’re pending patents in China, Japan, and Korea. Our initial patents, both in Europe and US received a hundred percent of their claims, which is unique, truly.

Henry O’Connell
Our approach was to look at the underlying bio features and markers in speech. So below the level of word, we analyze 2,548 speech features for human conditions. Things like stress and anxiety, depression, tiredness, alertness, cognitive function, and Canary has been able to build mathematical models that can very accurately analyze conversational speech, three to four minutes of speech. And we can provide a score for an individual that represents where their level of stress is.

Erica Robinson
That’s amazing. There’s definitely a need for this in society, especially, everything’s kind of moving towards that app platform and remote health care, I think. It’s really amazing. How does the technology compare to other voice recognition softwares or technologies in the healthcare field and in the market?

Henry O’Connell
Sure. Most analysis, currently in the field, are being done by word pattern. So they look at what words you’re speaking. They look at the gaps between words or filler words to try to analyze stress patterns. So do you speak stress related type of words? One of the problems with that is that it’s highly related to the particular characteristics of a person’s vocabulary and the use of words that they have, which may be affected by their education or by their culture or by their community.

Henry O’Connell
And in our case, we look at sub units below that and what that offers us quite simply as every 20 milliseconds, we look at all 2,548 bio features, and we extract those. We slide that window 10 milliseconds and do the same thing. So in a three minute audio, we have approximately 200,000 data points, correspondingly using other technique, you might have a thousand data points. And the consequences are when you’re looking at 200,000 data points, you can be more accurate, you can be more specific. We can tell the severity of someone’s stress in the morning, and after doing a meditation, or an event where they’re calming themselves, after they go walking, after they exercise, they could measure again and see the impact of that in their lives, providing them with biofeedback that’s accurate and objective.

Erica Robinson
And does this work for any language or currently kind of only for the English language? So could you detect stress and anxiety and tiredness across all languages?

Henry O’Connell
Currently we have validated our technology in Japanese and English. We are starting a project in mainland China in Mandarin Chinese, and in Europe. We are … when I say validated, we’ve actually taken it out because we’re sub-word level, we tend to be language agnostic. So it doesn’t matter what language we’re speaking. We will be adding French and Spanish next, in studies, we have a project in Dublin, Ireland, so accents and things like that really don’t affect our measurements, a Boston accent versus say an accent from South Carolina, it doesn’t matter.

Erica Robinson
That’s really, really cool. How would you train your algorithms or do the machine learning? How does that work? So I know with the Canary Speech that we’re partnering with NuCalm, we go through some of the GAD and general anxiety detection scores, and the stress level scores. Is that what you’re using to basically train the software?

Henry O’Connell
Yes, that’s accurate from the very beginning, Canary recognized that in order to accurately extract features that were specifically related to stress or anxiety, we needed to do that within controlled studies. So we’ve conducted dozens of controlled studies with pharma and with clinicals where we’ve used GAD-7, Pantis, Stay, the Modrus Test. For cognitive we’ve used things like the Montreal Protocol, which is used in assessing cognitive function and for Alzheimer’s studies. So we’ve aligned our feature extraction and our model building with industry standards that are accepted in clinical environments.

Henry O’Connell
And that’s provided us with the ability to extract specific features in established models. So to give you an idea of with stress, based on those clinical trials, we extracted 26 bio-features of the specific 2,548. So those 26 correlate very highly with stress. I like to tell people if we made it 27, the model isn’t any better and if we made a 25, the model isn’t as good. So 26 using machine learning and AI allowed us to create this algorithm. That algorithm, then when you pass three minutes of speech through, it can provide an accurate score back to the person on what their stress levels are. Now, over time, those models get better and better. They keep refining themselves and retraining themselves with exposure to a community for instance.

Erica Robinson
So the scores that you’re obtaining at the end of a voice recording, are they compared to your own baseline or to the community norm or both?

Henry O’Connell
Really both. So the score can establish a baseline for an individual. So when they see a score, when they first take it, the algorithm actually will become accustomed to them. And the score becomes related specifically to them, it also will compare against the community. So for instance, with NuCalm, there’s a community of users. We’ll establish what the normal level of stress or anxiety or tiredness or restfulness is for that community, and they can potentially compare themselves with the community that they interact with regularly. We also compare against standards and norms in the industry. So you have a standard comparison against the vast community and two dozen years of research. And then you have the individual, and also how they compare with the community that they’re engaged with.

David Poole
Henry, may I ask, sorry, Erica.

Erica Robinson
No, go ahead.

David Poole
How is this compared to some of the usual suspects in diagnostics for stress like cortisol testing, saliva testing, galvanic skin response, HRV, blood pressure, heart rate, those kind of things. Where does yours fit in there? Is it more accurate, less accurate?

Henry O’Connell
Well, our test takes into account, literally, hundreds of thousands of data points. Speech and language is considered to be the densest and most complex source of data that the human body produces. I like to say, and I’m a biochemist and a genomicist and I’d like to say next to the DNA only. So next to our own DNA, speech is probably the richest source of data we produce. We can gather a range of information from facial expressions to eye movement, to heart rate, to cortisol testing. All of those things can be additive to any other measurement that we might take.

Henry O’Connell
However, speech has some real advantages. One it’s very, very dense in data and information. And secondly, it’s easy to gather. We’re able to do an analysis on a speech pattern of about three minutes in milliseconds, and we can return a score then to an individual within two or three seconds. If you do a cortisol test, of course, you have to wait a while to get the results. If you do a hair cortisol test, it’s a little different than a saliva test. If you’re measuring your heart rate, that could be pretty instantaneous, but it can be affected by many things. It can be affected by exercise. It can be affected by the moment, there’s a fight or flight response that’s affected by the release of enzymes, which is what cortisol is measuring. All of those things have multiple reasons for being engaged in the body. Where speech itself has connected directly to the central nervous system.

Henry O’Connell
And the central nervous system then controls our muscular system, our vocal cords, our breathing, all of those things come into play along with how we form language and the wonderful thing about this, and we were talking about this earlier, Erica, is the human brain is capable of doing that, not in one language, but in hundreds and hundreds of languages and those languages communicate, not only words and meaning, but they communicate emotions. All we have to do is talk to any of our friends to realize that the words they’re saying are not just the meaning, but also the emotion they’re conveying in those words. And so language communicates both the literal meaning of what we’re saying from the words, but also the emotions that we have added to that because of who we are as people.

Erica Robinson
That’s very powerful. So you’re going on about emotions. Could you tell us, and you talked a little bit that you’ve done some research with Alzheimer’s in the mental health field, what are some of the research studies that you have going on? Or what are some of the patents, if you have any, in that kind of field? Because I know that’s a big point of discussion in today’s society.

Henry O’Connell
Yeah. Most of our studies today are on the area of mental health. So in mental health, we generally look at two areas. We look at what are called mood disorders or thought disorders and mood disorders are things like depression and stress and anxiety and thought disorders or things like bipolar and schizophrenia and things like that. What we found in a range of studies in depression, anxiety and stress was that we were able to selectively differentiate between the anxiety a person was experience and the level of their depression. Other factors that are key and important are how rested an individual is because of one has a prolonged period over which they don’t sleep well. That impacts on both their mood, depression, anxiety, and stress, but it also impacts on cognitive function. We don’t think as well. And we don’t think as clearly, and we can’t do computations and thought patterns as well, if we’re overly tired.

Henry O’Connell
So one of the wonderful things about our technology is that in that same three minutes of speech, if we were looking at depression, we can look at what is called comorbidities in the clinical area, which are associated or related human conditions or disease. So we look at depression, but at the same time, we may look at restfulness as well as stress and anxiety. An individual may be depressed, not because they’re chronically depressed, but because they’re exhausted. And so an individual looking at these measurements, which could all be assessed during the same three minutes of speech, could say to themselves, I need to get better sleep. I need to concentrate on getting my sleep improved because that’s going to impact on lowering my depression and managing my stress. Our patents today relate to, broadly speaking, they relate to the use of these biomarkers that we have identified within conversational speech, using smart devices, such as smartphones and tablets and things like that, in conversational speech to assess this.

Erica Robinson
And if we could go back to you were talking about people being able to understand the comorbidities of their mood disorder. Is that something that a consumer could learn themselves? Or is this something that a clinician would use to be able to explain to their patients?

Henry O’Connell
Oh, I think a consumer can use that to help manage their own health status and health condition, with respect to just their general wellness. If they find themselves creating a history over a period of weeks, and months of what their level of stress and anxiety is, and also they pay attention to, and we can measure their restfulness, if they find that in periods where they are simply not as well rested, they’re tired, for instance, they’re not getting good sleep or they’re overworking, or they’re traveling too much. Those things can all contribute to poor sleep and therefore a lack of restfulness, of tiredness in the person. They’ll probably see a corresponding pattern to increased stress and anxiety. So they can see these patterns and they recognize that as their stress and anxiety is going up, they have to pay attention.

Henry O’Connell
They just simply have to pay attention to getting better sleep, maybe delaying the next trip or getting to bed a bit earlier. And recognizing that part of their health and wellness is related to good sleep. As we all know, our nervous system wears out in just normal use. Most of its repair, the vast majority of its repair is done during deep sleep. And the consequences are that if we don’t have that deep sleep for prolonged periods of time, our nervous system is not repairing itself at the neuron level. And the consequences are that we’re more nervous, we’re more anxious, and we need to allow ourselves to have a healthy life and repair ourselves. So the combination of that information can help an individual manage their lives. That information, in a clinical setting, may help a doctor realize I don’t need to prescribe depression medication. I need to prescribe a pattern of life and living that allows this person to get better rest and sleep.

Erica Robinson
And have you seen that being used in both of those ways? And could you maybe give us a little bit of your personal story, because we do know that you’re using the technology. You said you and your wife are using it. Could you give us a little just anecdote about how you use it day to day and how it does impact your life?

Henry O’Connell
Sure. For the last year and a half, my wife and I daily measure our stress, anxiety and tiredness. Also, we look at cognitive function and it’s interesting because each individual is going to establish where their own baselines are and you have to be careful. It’s not a competition. So I tend to have lower stress levels than my wife does, I just tend to, about 10% lower. And that’s a normal. When we first started doing it and stress levels were higher, it was almost a competition. “Well, why are yours higher? You don’t get as much sleep as I do.” And what we found was that as we establish what our personal baselines were, we looked more within ourselves. How am I comparing to where I was last week? And how does that compare to the fact that I’m not getting as much rest and sleep as I know I need?

Henry O’Connell
And for every individual, the amount of sleep they need and the amount of rest they need is a little different too. But those things will correlate with their level of stress and anxiety. So they can begin to get those things in balance for themselves and for their own lives. And then my wife and I compare, not every day, but we compare our scores with one another. And I have to be careful because if I’ve been a little bit testy, my wife will say, “I bet your scores are higher.” And she’s usually right.

Henry O’Connell
And so it gives us feedback in our own lives. That allows us to say, “I don’t need to watch this episode of whatever on TV. I probably could just go to bed now.” I find in my personal life, I exercise quite a bit. I like to get out for a walk or a run every day. And if life is very busy, and our lives are, I tend to let those things slide. But if you’re measuring them regularly and you’re seeing an impact in your life, that’s not what you want. Then it draws your attention to the reality that, all of these things are quite important.

Erica Robinson
That’s amazing. David, do you have any other questions?

David Poole
Oh, I could talk all day. I like hearing Henry speak. You’ve got a very soothing voice. My stress level’s going down, just listening to you, Henry.

Henry O’Connell
It’s the Irish in me, David.

David Poole
I get it.

Henry O’Connell
I think I told you, I took the Ancestry DNA and I got a letter from them. They actually wrote me a letter, sent me a letter and I go to the mailbox it’s Ancestry, and I thought it was an advertisement to buy another thing or something. I opened it up and they said, “Mr. O’Connell, we wanted to recognize that having reviewed your DNA test, we found at 99.2%, you were more Irish than our employees in our Dublin office.” Which I thought … my four grandparents are immigrants from Ireland. But I thought there’s got to be something else in me, but apparently not.

Erica Robinson
Apparently not. I haven’t done one of those yet. Maybe at some point.

Henry O’Connell
It’s fun.

Erica Robinson
So just before we got on the recording, you were telling us about some of the new research projects you’re working on with Canary Speech and some of the new opportunities that you have within the United States. Do you think you could share those with us, again?

Henry O’Connell
I would love too. Canary Speech has been able to associate with some wonderful organizations, clinical centers across the country and join in a partnership with them to bring speech and language assessment, to help aid in evaluating their patients, doing assessments on stress and anxiety. Think of it as almost a mental health assessment. So a person comes in and they don’t necessarily think their life is any different than anyone else’s. But in fact, their stress levels are 40% higher than the normal, but they would report to their doctor, “Life is life, I’m okay.” But if they could begin to manage these things, either in their own personal lives or get counsel from their clinician about changes in their behaviors to help manage stress, it could make a significant improvement.

Henry O’Connell
Stress is a terrible thing. Over time, it impacts on the nervous system, the immune system, it destroys our immune system, if prolonged stress is allowed to be pervasive in our lives. So some of the practice we’re doing, we are working on a wonderful project and Alzheimer’s with the Gates Foundation and the Alzheimer’s Association. That’s going to be a multi-site, multi-country evaluation using speech and language as a tool to both assess the effectiveness of therapeutics that are being used, as well as individuals to personally manage their lives and clinicians to diagnose severities and progression of the disease. So that’s an amazingly wonderful thing. We’re working with the state of Wyoming for remote health and stress and anxiety in older populations. How are they progressing cognitively as they age? Doing assessments that are simple and easy to do and can be done at home. Clinicians can then receive those assessments and help them manage their lives better and improve, we hope, the quality of care.

Henry O’Connell
We’re engaged with a number of hospitals. As I mentioned, just wonderful ones, Intermountain Hospital, Hackensack Meridian, Atrium Hospital, and others that are just professionals, wonderful professionals. And there’s just a lot of desire, I think, to improve the effectiveness of the clinical teams we have, to provide care to remote populations as well as to better serve the communities that are around their hospitals. And there’s a real desire to help people get the information they need to manage their own lives too. And because most of our lives, something like 0.06% of our lives, is ever spent with a clinical person. So the vast majority of our lives, 99% plus of it, is something that we need to be able to have information, be able to manage our own lives. So that’s, I think, Canary can contribute to that. We were talking about earlier about heart rate and cortisol tests or other things. Speech is another element, and I think a wonderful one, but it’s another element that can provide information to individuals, to self manage their lives.

Erica Robinson
That’s a really good end note right there. O’Connell tells us about the future of Canary Speech and the potential for this technology, all throughout the world really.

Henry O’Connell
Well, I appreciate it. I appreciate the time today, very much.

Erica Robinson
I really do too. And just one little fun thing that Dave and I were talking about, just to get to know you a little bit better, we wanted to just ask a personal question. What was the last book you read?

Henry O’Connell
Well, I really … and my family tells me I should stay away from it, but I really enjoy reading about politics right now. And I was reading a Glenn Beck book, it’s not a new one of his, just the other day. And honestly, I just opened it up and started reading. I don’t remember what the title is, but it was Glenn Beck. And he has softened, in the last couple of years. Five years ago, my stress levels would go up reading him, but he has softened in the last couple of years, particularly. And he was talking about the need for all of us to cross aisles and work together. And this particular book was on some of the political framework of today, which is complex in the US, as you know.

Erica Robinson
That’s awesome. Okay.

Henry O’Connell
Thank you.

Erica Robinson
Thank you so much for taking some time with us. We’re really excited to get all of our Mastermind participants using the technology and providing data points to really build the machine learning software. And we’re excited to have you on a call with everyone, hopefully answering some more questions that come up from our consumers themselves.

Henry O’Connell
We look forward to it, Erica. Thank you.

 

Can Your Speech Indicate Stress?

Ever thought three minutes of light conversation could give you that much information?

Henry O’Connell, Founder and CEO of Canary Speech joins guest-host Erica Robinson from Solace LifeSciences to talk about how the Canary Speech app uses AI and machine learning to provide 200 thousand data points to analyze stress levels in speech patterns.

 

“When you’re looking at 200,000 data points, you can be more accurate, you can be more specific. We can tell the severity of someone’s stress in the morning and after doing a meditation or an event where they’re calming themselves. After they go walking or after they exercise, they can measure again and see the impact of that in their lives.”

— Henry O’Connell

 

AI training for the Canary Speech algorithm was enabled through a multitude of clinical and pharma studies and resulted in models that are aligned with industry standards. Henry O’Connell shares some of the research they did as well as the results they generated.

Tune in and take notes; you may be surprised to hear the truth behind our speech.

 

More About Henry O’Connell, Founder of Canary Speech

Henry O’Connell has over 20 years of executive and C-level experience. Following graduate school, O’Connell began his career at the National Institutes of Health in a neurological disease group and continued on to a successful business career specializing in turnaround situations in the tech industry.

Find out more about Henry O’Connell on his LinkedIn

From Resentment to Participation, Driving Change with Magnus Johnson

Magnus Johnson, co-Founder of Mission 22, joins the show to share his journey as a veteran participating in the effort to increase mental health for people who have served. From his experience in the military to working with cohorts of vets like himself, Magnus talks about the path to integrating warriors into their new worlds.

 

“You might not know the right answers, you might not know what you should or shouldn’t do but you must participate. That statement hit me.”

— Magnus Johnson

 

Learn more about Johnson’s techniques in developing practices and maintaining a regimen in this special Memorial Day Week/Weekend episode of This Is NuCalm.

 

Listen to This Is NuCalm on Apple & Spotify!

 

Magnus Johnson is an eight-year Army Veteran, former Green Beret, family man, writer, and artist. He completed three combat tours, two in Afghanistan and one in Iraq. As President and Co-Founder of Mission 22, a 501(c)3 organization, Johnson leverages his talents, skills, and understanding of warrior psychology to help solve the suicide epidemic engulfing America’s veterans.

He is a visionary leader and excellent at forming individualized solutions to large challenges. Johnson has been awarded a Bronze Star Medal for Combat actions and a Congressional Record in the Indiana House of Representatives for Service to Country and Community.

 

Find out more about Magnus on his LinkedIn.



Key Takeaways

[1:00] David welcomes Magnus Johnson, former Green Beret Special Forces veteran, and asks him to share a little bit about growing up and how 9/11 propelled him into an entirely different life.

 

[8:20] Infantry and Green Beret are different in a series of fundamental ways, Magnus shares his experience of both. He also talks about learning to become a demolition expert.

 

[10:55] All great things require sacrifice but Magnus wasn’t aware of the gravity of the sacrifices he made during his service until he transitioned back to civilian life. He speaks of his lengthy reintegration experience.

 

[14:13] Navigating intimacy, trust, and vulnerability unfolded serendipitously through a smart and understanding woman he met whose father served in Vietnam — his wife Sara.

 

[16:23] Magnus takes a moment to describe some of the concrete methods he used to drive himself towards positivity and redeveloping his frontal cortex function and his ability to connect, create intimacy, and be vulnerable.

 

[18:18] Is it the military? The Government? The community? Parents? Culture? Involvement in armed conflict invites serious philosophical questions of responsibility as it relates to soldiers’ mental health. Magnus speaks of his own understanding of the core problems as well as how he sees the solutions.

 

[23:18] Mission 22 was Magnus’s response to feeling disenfranchised by the V.A. compounded by the suicide epidemic. He shares the radical change of thought that started it all.

 

[29:42] What does Mission 22 do, how does NuCalm come into play and how can listeners help or get involved?

 

[33:52] Program engagement and compliance are tricky, Magnus shares how his organization promotes it.

 

[36:52] Magnus talks about the problem of substance abuse and while his programs — and NuCalm — can help with addiction in general, they are not built to tackle that singular issue.

 

[39:32] Family engagement has been a huge revelation for Magnus, he shares some of his plans for the future of Mission 22 in that regard.

 

[41:59] The ever-serious Magnus also likes running, snowboarding, rock climbing, reading, and creating! He also nerds out on The Hobbit!

 

[46:15] On the possibility of teaching, and running for office.

 

[48:32] Audience question #1 How often does Magnus use NuCalm?

 

[50:49] #2 What is the R&R program on Mission 22?

 

[52:35] #3 How long has Magnus been using NuCalm?

 

[54:18] #4 What tracks does Magnus use and how long does he do it?

 

[56:06] #5 Magnus’s tips for focusing under massive amounts of stress.

 

[58:09] #6 Has Magnus integrated manual therapy with NuCalm?

 

[1:10:01] #7 Magnus’ advice for a new NuCalm user on building a routine in a time crunch or in a setting where you can’t show weakness.

 

[1:17:30] David thanks Magnus for his service and for sharing so much of his experience.

 

Continue on your journey and until next time, breathe deep, relax, and keep looking forward.

 

Mentioned in this episode

NuCalm

Mission 22

The Language of Creation: Cosmic Symbolism in Genesis, by Mathieu Pageau

The Secret of the Golden Flower: A Chinese Book of Life, by Richard Wilhelm

On The Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ, by Saint Maximus Confessor

Embodied Spirituality in a Sacred World, by Michael Washburn

Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness are the Keys to Understanding the True Nature of the Universe, by Robert Lanza MD with Bob Berman

 

This is NuCalm, the show for those looking to improve sleep quality, manage stress, and boost recovery. Brought to you by Solace Lifesciences, the makers of NuCalm, the world’s only patented and proven neuroscience technology that works within minutes, without drugs, every time! In over one million medical sessions, NuCalm has helped men and women around the world.

 

NuCalm: stress relief for the way we live today, technology to help you disconnect.


Full Transcript

David Poole
Good evening, everybody. It’s David Poole and Erika Robinson again from Solace Lifesciences and we’re here to welcome you to another master series call, Thursday-night call. This is, I think, the second or third one we’ve done in 2021 and I’m thrilled and really honored to host Magnus Johnson tonight.

David Poole
So, I first became aware of Magnus, Jim’s been running points. Everybody knows probably on this call that I have another twin brother Jim, who’s my boss, and with the military. And he shared a quote with use from Magnus years ago, two or three years ago and it was really profound, really powerful and when you run a business and have a product and you’re always trying to think of the right ways to present it and then someone who doesn’t know anything about your tech and isn’t invested in marketing for you comes out with a brilliant, sincere, authentic way to present it, I just remember that. And I use that quote if you don’t mind, Magnus, very often when I’m talking to people especially around post-traumatic stress and the phenomenon of assimilating back into civilian life after a year of service.

David Poole
So, we’ve had several of these calls which are really meaningful for us with decorated service people. And tonight, Magnus is a retired Special Forces Army stud, if you will, and one of the things that we’ll talk about that for sure, that’s always exciting for us and those are real-life heroes. I’ve developed an unbelievable appreciation for the people who sacrifice the way they do to defend us and keep us safe.

David Poole
Let’s get started. I’d like to introduce you to Magnus Johnson and I want to talk a bit from the beginning. I’d like to start in these conversations by inviting Magnus and our guest to share their life journey. I think it’s always curious to find out how you do what you do, why you do what you do, where you came from and what’s your interest in doing next.

Magnus Johnson
Okay. Hi, David. Thanks for the introduction. So, my name’s Magnus Johnson, a former Green Beret. 40 years old and I guess my life journey, it started in a van. My dad was a Welsh rocker. My mom was kind of a young college student. They met in Norway. My dad was from Wales, my mom was from Minnesota. And we lived on the road and he played music and we went to flea markets and sold stuff, traveled around and it was, what’s the word, Bohemian. I don’t know. Rubber tramps, homeless. We happened to have talent. They had creativity. They wanted to live that way, but it was definitely not like a Mercedes van that you see today. You know what I mean? It wasn’t a recreation REI commercial. It was a sky blue van with a mural and we had to fix the carburetor to get around to the next flea market.

Magnus Johnson
And so the journey starts there, I think because it was rough. I had to pay attention. Back in the 80s as a kid running around flea markets is a bit different. I had to be creative. I remember buying and selling things and fix them up and having my own little flea market booth, buying knives, polishing them, sharpening them, and then reselling them. And the way this ties in is that we were moving around. There was a sense of adventure. I had to have my wits about me and I liked moving. I liked moving through life, symbolically, physically. I’ve always had itchy feet since then.

Magnus Johnson
And then, as life went on, I did a lot of work. I worked in the oil field. I tried a little bit of commercial fishing. I did some post and polling, carpentry, concrete, sales, I tried sales. And one day it just kind of dawned on me that … Well, actually 9/11 happened. Okay. So, get an idea who I am, the traveler, I like working, I like getting outside, I like adventure. 9/11 happens and up until that point, I never went to a recruiter. I thought the Air Force was cool flying jets, but I didn’t want to be in the military. I didn’t hate authority, but I didn’t like the idea being told what to do, when to do it, and how to do it. And so, I was fine with that. I was just going to cut my own way, but then 9/11 happened and then something inside of me completely altered. I couldn’t stop thinking about it. I wouldn’t even call it I wanted to seek revenge so much as that I wanted to participate in the biggest thing happening in our lifetime and I felt that I was young, I was able and that I should participate.

Magnus Johnson
And as I was deliberating whether or not to join, I came across a guy named Joseph Campbell. And he wrote the book Hero with a Thousand Faces, basically the hero’s journey template that Disney uses and films use, it’s based off this guy. And you might not know the right answers. You might not know what you should or shouldn’t do but you must participate. And that line, that statement hit me.

Magnus Johnson
And then, I remember watching TV and judging and, “That reporter’s full of crap,” or, “They should do this,” this back seat sort of couch quarterback stuff at a young age and I was like, “Man! I don’t know what I’m talking about. I have no idea what’s going on. I’m a voyeur. I’m just sitting back here judging something I have no idea. How do I know if it’s right or wrong or justified or not justified,” because I got no skin in the game. And so, eventually, I was compelled. I had to do it.

Magnus Johnson
And so, I joined the military and I wanted to go to Europe and I wanted to be combat arms. And so, that was infantry, tanker, cav scout, or combat engineer at the time. And so, the recruiter was like, “Hey, combat engineer’s like infantry with C-4.” That’s probably not entirely true, but at the time, I was like, “Yep. That’s me. That’s what I want to do. I want to be just like infantry in addition with C-4.” And infantry guys will say, “Oh, B.S.” But, for a combat engineer, it depends on who you’re attached to, what you end up doing.

Magnus Johnson
And then, I ended up in Ramadi, Iraq in 2006, which was, if people are in the military know that that location at that time was very violent, very hard, a lot of death, and I got resentful and I got bitter about my experience because I felt like I really wasn’t … I mean, it was there and I did my job, but it was more, even though as a soldier, it felt passive. We’d go on patrol. They would tell us to be somewhere at a certain time and do something at a certain time and then that’s what we would do. And I knew that if I was going to stay in the military and stay involved in this conflict that I needed to do it as a Green Beret.

Magnus Johnson
And so, I signed up, went to selection, passed, and did two more tours as a Green Beret, but an engineer, so I kept access to the demo and kept doing that job. And so that’s sort of the spirit of what led me there. I mean, there’s obviously a lot more details, but that’s sort of who I was in a nutshell, what kind of drove me and then the catalyst that altered my decisions.

David Poole
So, you said you got resentful and a little bitter and then you wanted to be a deeper part of the action, so obviously you’re a person who, like you said, wants to be involved in the game. Can you walk me through the experiences you had as a Green Beret? How are they different than just as an infantry guy with demolition skills?

Magnus Johnson
Well, it’s bottom up instead of top down, so you’re creating the intelligence. You’re reporting to higher … I mean, sometimes they tell you what to do, but you’re reporting to higher what you think you should do and most of the time, they support that. So, you have much more … As you’re on a team, you’re not the commander or the Zulu, the team sergeant, but you’re the expert in your field and they take your … So, if they want to, “Hey, blow up this building,” or, “Take out this IUD,” or, “Build this,” they come to you for your expertise. They’ll tell you what they want and give you a right and left limit and an end state but you have that authority to make it happen.

Magnus Johnson
And so, I love doing Army stuff. I didn’t like being in the Army. And so, I need to find a way to make that work and for me, that was special forces because it’s very serious, it’s very fast, you’re expected to know your job and the decisions you make matter, they make or just the mission will be a success or failure based on some of your decisions, the things you do. And it’s just full tilt and that’s what I wanted. I didn’t want to be … I mean, don’t take anything away from the regular Army guys. I was one. It’s a hard life, but I wanted to be driving the mission. I didn’t want to just be participating in this bigger mission. I wanted to actually get my hands on it and understand it and create it, develop it and then do it.

David Poole
Can I ask you just a tactical question about that? How do you learn the job to be a demolitions expert? Did you ever have chances where you did too much C-4 and a lot more of the community disappeared than you expected. I mean-

Magnus Johnson
No. I mean, the training’s phenomenal. I mean, the training, the process is phenomenal. Mistakes can be made, but that organization recruits and trains and mentors better than any other organization I’ve ever seen.

David Poole
Excellent. So, can you walk us through the transition from being a demolitions expert and serving and being an almost owner-operator, part of a group like that, to coming back to civilian life and faking it till you make it?

Magnus Johnson
Yeah. Whether you’re building a business or writing a book or maybe doing a PhD, anything great requires sacrifice and though my military service, I was sacrificing the whole time without knowing it and I couldn’t see or feel or wasn’t aware of the gravity of some of these sacrifices until my surrounding’s changed. Within the military, within the situation, I knew I had some problems with memory and I was having some problems with self-medication, and all these other issues but my mirrors looked like me.

Magnus Johnson
Then, when I got out of the military, I started to realize like, “Well, I am different. I’m at a different speed or pace. The continuity, the flow, how I speak to people. Everything’s off, a little.” Have you seen the movie Men in Black, the first one? When the alien crashes and puts on the farmer’s skin, that’s how I felt. I mean, I felt like awkward and aggressive and confident, but then not knowing how to engage in this other kind of alien world and everything was sort of off and I couldn’t get the timing and the rhythm and I couldn’t get comfortable and obviously it turned out to be complications with traumatic brain injury and some PTSD and all these other things that … We can unpack that more because I think that some of those terms and better … It’s more of a nuanced explanation, but I began to become aware that I was a little bit isolating, not really connecting with people, not really enjoying what I should or what people said I should.

Magnus Johnson
And I don’t think they were 100% right but they are right that I needed to find a new way. They call it transition, but I need to integrate being a warrior, not abandon it. And I think the kind of message is, “Hey, abandon this identity and now you’re home, now you need this identity.” And that doesn’t work for me. I couldn’t go from driving a Ferrari to a VW Bug and think, act, talk, be, communicate in this completely different culture overnight. And I didn’t want to disown who I am to take on this other role that is not me, but I needed to find a way to integrate it and so that took some time. I’m still doing it. I think we all are to some degree with our transitions in life and the different identities and the roles we play.

David Poole
How many years have you been out of the service, Magnus?

Magnus Johnson
I think nine.

David Poole
Okay.

Magnus Johnson
I got out in the end of 2011-

David Poole
Yep. We’ll you’re in your-

Magnus Johnson
… or maybe more.

David Poole
… 10th year now.

Magnus Johnson
Yeah.

David Poole
How did you navigate things like intimacy and relationships and trust and how to be vulnerable with people you didn’t know yet?

Magnus Johnson
I wish I could say I got Brené Brown as a mentor, Power of Vulnerability, but luckily, I met a woman that, her dad was in Vietnam. So, you can look at that two ways. You’re just continuing these kind of military warped relationships, but we didn’t do that but luckily, her dad was in Vietnam. She had a general understanding of some of this stuff, but then there was no pity and she wasn’t like a doormat, either, but there was familiarity, understanding and she’s a very powerful person, my wife.

Magnus Johnson
This is a big question so it’s going to take me a moment to talk about it, but intimacy is a very difficult thing after a long period of aggression and violence, conflict, adrenaline. Your frontal lobe gets shut down with stress, with tension in the body, with fight or flight, your identity, your frontal lobe, your sort of compassion and ability to connect and have joy and be vulnerable, it’s not that you don’t intellectually understand. It’s that it’s physiologically impossible unless you develop it depending on who you are and depending on how your life’s been.

Magnus Johnson
And so, I think lucky for me, my wife’s dad was in Vietnam. She’s very bright. I had a desire to be better. A lot of people burn in after they get out of the military. I sort of burning in while I was still in, so I had the chance to kind of work on some stuff while I was still in. And I’m a visual person. And one day, I had this visual feeling that there’s a scale in front of me. I’m in charge of where the pebbles go. And if I do every little decision and put the pebbles on the side of positivity, sooner or later, that thing’s going to tip.

Magnus Johnson
And so, I started to try to develop awareness, consciousness, observing my behavior, asking myself why I think and act and respond in certain ways and then trying to be able to get a little more time between a flash and a bang. So, and people do this today with the meditation practice, like observe your feelings, observe your motivations.

Magnus Johnson
And so because of that partnership with her, because of my willingness and desire to want to be that way, I’ve read hundreds of books. I’ve gone to Buddhist temples. Obviously, I use NuCalm. I do all these different things to increase my capacity for intimacy, vulnerability, joy, being in the present and keeping my body at a state of calm so that I can cognate, empathize, and connect, but I had to want to do it and then I had to create habits and disciplines that made that more probable. I couldn’t just decide to do it. I had to create an environment where that could happen.

David Poole
I know. It seems almost unfair that you take, as a young kid. Like you said, you wanted to fight. And you brainwash to some degree, I mean, they’re building you, so you marshal all your intensity to command and to control and destroy the target. And then you decide you’re done. You don’t reenlist and then you’ve got to catch up to everybody else who’s been playing this game of life in less serious circumstances and you’re not allowed a lot of opportunity to fail and you’re judged for it. I wonder if it would make more sense, and this is a silly conversation, but if our soldiers really started training at 30 years old instead of 20 years old and they had that adaptive experience and the desire to mature into a grown man instead of a soldier at 22 to 30, and the adjustment would be maybe a little easier because you’d have some context.

Magnus Johnson
I used to think that, but I don’t think that. That’s a [inaudible 001906] and hit. So, infantry mean infant soldier. That’s where the word derives from, infantry and infant. And wars always make young men die and old men talk. You hear this. And if you look throughout history, soldiers have been very young, especially in the infantry.

Magnus Johnson
It’s a philosophical question when you look at who’s responsible. Is it the military responsible? Is the government responsible? Are my parents responsible? Is the community responsible? Am I responsible? Is America in general responsible? So, I thought long and hard about this question and how you solve this problem and where the source of it is. And throughout history, conflict has always been a part of human history. What’s changed is how our contemporary culture thinks about it, thinks about wars, thinks about people that have participated in it, views it as separate. Less people do more of the fighting for longer in a post-modern Western society.

Magnus Johnson
For instance, Vietnamese veterans, I mean, at least from the studies I’ve read and from PhDs that have researched it. I don’t know from their own experiences, but what I’ve read from the research they’ve done is that Vietnamese soldiers don’t have PTSD like our American Vietnam veterans do. So, it’s how you conduct the war, where you conduct the war, the reasons for conducting the war and then what the role and the responsibility, the community and how they view warriors and how warriors view themselves. And so I don’t blame the military or the VA. They could always do better, but I think the blame to me is starting to go on the value systems that we have. I think we’re kind of at the tail end of a postmodern society who values superficial things and expects other people to pick up the tab.

Magnus Johnson
And so I don’t explicitly blame an institution or a military. I just think all of us haven’t caught up to the reality of what world we’re living in. I think the VA and the military are going to catch up but I think we need to catch up. We need to think about our role as community members and then that unpacks a bunch of political things like whether the war is right or wrong or what we should be doing and therein lies where I believe the PTSD emerges, that the path of honor, the path of full transition of integration, of a welcoming home, and this is who you are and we honor that, we respect that and now, here’s your role in society. That path has stayed intact until probably Korea, Vietnam, World War One, World War Two when war became industrialized. Maybe Napoleon. Napoleon started doing war of attritions. So, that started to fall apart when war became industrialized.

Magnus Johnson
It’s a lot there but there’s more to it than just the VA, the army. It really falls to all of us in different capacities.

David Poole
It’s very complex and our young men and women have paid the consequences and sacrifices, every generation. And for all of us who didn’t serve, we certainly appreciate what you go through. It seems like you’ve really taken on the burden and the complexity of it and thought through it a lot and you continue to evolve, which is remarkable and congratulations and keep up the good work.

Magnus Johnson
Well, I don’t want to be a victim. I don’t want to blame PTSD on something or somebody or something. We’re all in this together. We’re alive together. We’re going to die. And it’s happening real time right now, a hundred miles an hour and we’re adapting as we go and we’re learning, we’re growing, and we’re changing and technology’s getting better and we’re getting on the computer and ideas are coming together and …

Magnus Johnson
So, there needs to be a little grace here because we’re developing so quickly, so fast, and we’re learning things at such a rate and I think we need to give ourselves a little grace and think of not so much what we did wrong but what we can do better, because it’s crazy difference in just my lifetime and I’m only 40.

David Poole
Look, can we talk for a moment or as long as you’d like about how you got into the idea of Mission 22 and the opportunity to serve and help and really focus on giving back.

Magnus Johnson
There’s a theme here. I got resentful. I got out and I wasn’t mad at the VA and I was disenfranchised with, I believed all these things as a young man. I did it. I came out. It’s not true. But woe is me. And I got out and I thought I was arrogant. I’m like, “Okay. I’m going to get out. I’ll go do something. It won’t be a big deal. I’ll start a business.” And I was going to get a gold claim. I was going to hike all these different … I was going to do all these sort … But I was dead serious.

Magnus Johnson
And then some people I knew were killing themselves. And suicide’s a part of life. People can take their own lives. They have for a long time, but the frequency of it was starting to become apparent to me in 2011, 2012. And then I started Googling and then I started hearing about the 22-a-day suicide rate, and then you can argue that, like, “No, that’s this and this,” and however you get to that number, whether it’s Vietnam veterans or this or that. You can get all of them nuanced, but a lot of suicide’s happening. I’m going to blame somebody and somebody should do something.

Magnus Johnson
And then I was driving my old truck to go get a Big Gulp and a pack of cigarettes. I don’t smoke anymore and I don’t drink Big Gulp anymore, but this is like, got out of the military, whatever. And I saw this sign and it was a quote from some, probably Gandhi or something. It said, “Be the change you want to be.” It was a quote on a chalk board at a park and they would update it every day. And it said, “Be the change you want to be.” And I don’t know exactly who said it, but it’s probably somebody like that.

Magnus Johnson
And man, and I looked in the mirror and I got home, I’m like, “I’m bitter, I’m resentful, I’m pointcasting blame. I’m thinking what everybody should and shouldn’t do,” just like I was before I signed up. And, “Well, what the hell are you doing about it,” is what I asked myself. And I had to look in the mirror and go, “Nothing.” That sounds a little schizophrenic, but I wasn’t doing nothing and I knew it. And then, so the suicides were happening. I’m not doing anything and I’m blaming other people for it.

Magnus Johnson
And then you think of the scale thing with the pebbles of positivity and it’s like, “Okay. I’m not going to be the savior. I’m not going to save the veterans or whatever but I’m going to participate in solutions. I’m going to engage my life, the ugly, sloppy, stupid, outdated, unaware, naïve, for all of that, but I’m going to engage my life. I’m going to participate and I’m going to add value where I can and if I make a mistake, I’ll fix it. I’m going to participate in this.”

Magnus Johnson
And so, that was kind of the catalyst, the suicides. I started reading about it. I learned the truth. It’s hard to unlearn the truth. And then I had a moment of reckoning with myself. And then I had to make a decision and then it goes back to the beginning of my sort of stories. I want to be physically there. I want to just intellectually or academically, I want to physically participate and I want to think but I don’t want it to be theory. I want to see it manifest. And so then I began, I started. The first thing I did was this big art instillation and I knew how to weld. I knew how to work with metal. And I’m like, “What can I do?” And so we built this really cool art sculpture in the middle of this town that gets three million tourists a year. And I used what I knew and I participated.

David Poole
It’s amazing. It feels like that’s the theme here, not the resentful piece but you need to be in the action. I’d like to give you a couple big challenges like global hunger and climate change and get you to participate and solve those problems. No pressure!

Magnus Johnson
Yeah. I mean, but all this stuff requires a lot of introspection and thought. And then you need to galvanize yourself. And then don’t do it for the wrong reasons. You don’t want to be a hero. I remember thinking in the beginning, we started helping veterans and stuff like, “Oh, you’re helping me so much.” For a while there, I became really uncomfortable, like, “No. I’m not.”

Magnus Johnson
I read a book by Mother Teresa and she said, “Dismiss the compliments and the criticisms.” You can hear them. It’s feedback but don’t hold onto it. So, I appreciate compliments and I appreciate criticism, but a compliment doesn’t … I intentionally try not to allow it to skew my perspective of self. The same thing with criticism.

Magnus Johnson
And so, the charity work or solving problems or doing these things, there’s a dark side to charity where it’s because you’re codependent or you want to be seen as charitable. But once you get past that and just like to participate in this endeavor. I’m not God. I’m not saving anyone. I’m creating an environment by a lot of hard work where people can engage and participate in their lives and we’re doing it together and that’s what’s fun. And the minute I take responsibility for other people’s lives, I will never, ever, ever be happy. I will constantly feel like I’m never doing enough and I will think of myself as, “I could have done this,” and, “I could have done that.” And then I will be basically arrogant because I’m not God and I’m not that powerful and I can’t change anyone or anything, but I can just continue to put the pebbles on the scale and recruit and request and be consistent in my effort to be a participant in something that is helping a change.

Magnus Johnson
So, that’s been kind of a maturity thing over the last decade of doing this type of work, because in the beginning, I wanted to go pluck people out of the fire. And then some people, no matter how hard you pull won’t come out and if you think that’s your responsibility, it’s going to crush you.

David Poole
No. It’s absolutely true, indeed. Can you talk about how your charity Mission 22 helps people today? What’s the platform? What’s the framework? How can people get involved?

Magnus Johnson
Yeah. Well, I mean, there’s the obvious. Donate, buy a shirt, talk and all that, but I think we do a lot of things, but I want to talk about R+R. It’s the new program that we’ve created which is a year long, it involves NuCalm in the [inaudible 003123] supplementation, it involves biofeedback tools, it involves coaching over a year’s period and it involves nutrition and it involves meditation and it involves reading books. And the reason it involves all these things is because changing who you are or overcoming your ego or re-wiring your frontal lobe or changing your physiology is difficult. And it takes time and effort and repetition.

Magnus Johnson
And so what I’m really … I mean, from the website, we do a lot of stuff. You can see it all on the website but the biggest thing that I’m really excited about because the Special Forces motto is to free the oppressed. And so, by creating this pipeline where people go on a journey of, they’re learning to meditate, they’re learning to eat right, they’re learning to engage back into working out. They’re understanding nutrition supplementation and they’re measuring their sleep and stress with the best like Garmin Fenix 6 and the best watches we can get that accurately measure these indicators, that’s kind of what I’ve been most excited about. As far as numbers, we’ve only got roughly 50 people in that program. We just got started a few months ago. I was beginning before the COVID, but COVID set everything back.

Magnus Johnson
So, that’s not a lot of people. We feed people. We have horse programs. We do the ambassador program. We got a national monument being built this summer. We’ve had other health programs and doctors that we’ve paid for. So, if we look at the ambassadors, I can say like, “Oh, we have thousands of ambassadors,” and this and that, but the real exciting thing is we’re creating a program that’s scalable, that’s driven by the participant where they go through the hero’s journey. They learn who they are. They understand the terms, the transitions, the psychology of what’s going on with them and then they’re the hero in their journey versus the victim or versus the person being helped. We all need help sometimes, but when we start to believe the narrative that someone just needs to help us, help us, help us but we don’t realize that sometimes we have to help ourselves and then help others and become a helper and while we’re getting help.

Magnus Johnson
And so, that’s what I’m most excited about. I can list off like concrete, all our programs or ways to get involved as far as an ambassador or social media or to volunteer or donate, but I think the reason with NuCalm and having this conversation is rest, recovery, and resiliency program. Call it R+R for short. And that’s the program I’m most excited about, that’s the one I’m going to have all my attention focused, that’s the one I’m going to try to scale and that’s the one I’m going to take to the VA, and that’s the one I’m going to take to the army, and that’s the one I think that people are going to start understanding that they’re their hero in their own narrative and that’s the … Doctors aren’t available 24/7. Psychologists aren’t available 24/7. I am not available 24/7, but you are to yourself. The biggest asset we have is ourselves. But, in order to change, it requires habits and discipline and support and that, at some point in that journey of change, then you have to be willing to help others and that’s full integration.

David Poole
How do you encourage compliance remotely with a change paradigm or platform like that? It seems really challenging? I’m just curious about the engagement. Do you talk to them once a week on Zoom? Is it …

Magnus Johnson
I don’t personally. I’m mentoring the people that are running the program. And so we have a wellness coordinator who speaks to them at least quarterly, if not monthly, and then we have coaches, they do minimum of six coaching sessions per quarter. And then, the group as in a cohort and they interact with a wellness coordinator on a cohort model on the internet.

Magnus Johnson
And so, if you create a culture of accountability, it becomes self-cleansing, self-operating, self-driving. And so I’m trying to create a culture of accountability, desire, sometimes tough love. Not like, “Get up. You don’t feel any pain.” Not that, but, “Hey, you’re only a good as your last thought.” Like, “Well, I meditated last week.” “Cool. You meditated today?” “No. I worked out two years ago.” You’re like, “Yeah. You need to work out every day.” But you can create an environment and a culture where that becomes the standard. There’s a lot of culture. So, in the military you can get this on a disenfranchised outsider culture. Think of bikers, veterans only hanging out by themselves, other than outsiders separate and I think that just aggravates it. There’s comfort in that because it’s not the intimacy piece, being vulnerable. You don’t have to do that as much because you’re accepted, you’re known, and you know what to expect.

Magnus Johnson
But I think when the standard becomes no, as warriors, we seek humility, we seek patience, we seek vulnerability when it’s appropriate, we don’t use one ability just to get attention. It’s a tricky thing people do to play a little game, but vulnerability has a point and a place to use authentically. And so I want to create a culture where, instead of this stigma veteran outsider, it’s the warrior fully integrated pursuing family, community, fitness, nutrition, meditation, and self-actualization and self-awareness and that becomes what we aspire to do. So, that’s kind of how I’m creating that.

Magnus Johnson
Some people will quit. Some people won’t like it. Sure. It gets hard. Well, it’s a serious problem, so it’s a serious program. If you come to my fire camp for the weekend and we all feel good, great. But what habits have you take? I mean, maybe I said something nice and you feel better and I feel better, but have you developed a habit? Do you have a tool that you can use on a daily basis to alter your thought patterns, your hormonal responses? That requires time, effort, and repetition. It just does.

David Poole
How do you deal with drug and alcohol abuse in a program like this, because you got to get that out of the way. I mean, it’s-

Magnus Johnson
Yeah. I mean, that’s always the big one, because when you’re engaged in alcoholic behavior, it’s very difficult to do anything else. And most people I think find when they address their addictions, they realize that a lot of their problems were just untreated addiction and, then some people realize that they had other problems that they didn’t know they had.

Magnus Johnson
And so unfortunately, all we can say is like, “Hey, this is not specifically for addiction but it can help with addiction,” like NuCalm helps with addictions, proper supplementation helps with addiction, working out helps with addiction. All these things help with addiction but addiction is outside of my power. The only thing that I’ve seen that scientifically to … I’m not talking about alleviate craving, but to make a fundamental change in an individual, the only thing I’ve come across is either people that go on, develop this profound meditation practice with, what do they call? What’s the word? Sangha. With a community and AA. AA has been the most powerful thing if, again …

Magnus Johnson
Now science and technology and procedures and things are starting to kind of develop new things and I know NuCalm helps with that, with the GABA and the … But the only thing that seemed to work is people that really want to get sober are fully committed to sobriety, and then they engage in a program such as AA or NA and actually do that work. But it’s like, “Oh, I’m going to stop drinking.”

Magnus Johnson
I think two people in all of history have just decided to stop drinking if they’re a full-blown alcoholic, because there’s a significant difference between a heavy drinker and a full-blown alcoholic. Once a cucumber becomes a pickle, it can never be a cucumber again. You cross a line and there’s a change. And so unfortunately, we know a lot about AA. NuCalm helps with it. The other things help, and I have experience with this stuff, but R+R won’t get you sober. It can help you in your path to sobriety, but you don’t do R+R to get sober. You use R+R while you’re engaged in sobriety.

David Poole
Got you.

Magnus Johnson
And maybe that’ll develop in the future but where we are today with the science and the understanding of it. That’s my knowledge of it. That doesn’t mean I know [inaudible 004123].

David Poole
How do you engage the family in the R+R program and some of the other programs you guys have at Mission 22?

Magnus Johnson
I’ll tell you. This has been a huge revelation to me. We need to make a spouses program, because post-traumatic stress, it spreads. Sympathetic post-traumatic stress. I don’t know if you’ve heard that, but that’s a real thing.

Magnus Johnson
And so, there’s a dynamic where a veteran gets better because of all his work and his resources and support from everybody, but the spouses are left behind because they’re not the veterans. So, they’re not the one everyone wants to help, but they’re the ones that have been holding it all together this whole time. And so, there needs to be way more support for the people who support, because they’re, in a lot of ways, kind of elite.

Magnus Johnson
For a while, my wife paid the bills, talked to people, kept things on track, explained things to me because I couldn’t hear or I was having a hard time just being a man, doing what I’m supposed to do. I could work all day. I could do a 15-hour a day’s labor but I found it difficult to talk to the checkout person at Home Depot and then driving traffic and then deal with rude people at the checkout. These things are overwhelming.

Magnus Johnson
And so my wife was sort of … I engaged the world through her, which is not right. And out of love, she was willing to take on that burden and there comes a point in time where I need to take back my responsibility, my role and share that with her and I think a lot of veterans get hung up in these dynamics that we develop because of trauma. And at certain junctures throughout the relationship, we need to renegotiate the roles of our relationships because I’m changing, they’re changing, things are changing. This is a long explanation where the family of a veteran is just as important as the veterans themselves and the likelihood of success of treating a veteran is to treat the entire family or participate with the entire family in a transformational experience.

David Poole
Yeah. You seem like a very serious person. What are you doing for fun that’s just for you?

Magnus Johnson
Yeah. I wrestle with that. So, I like snowboarding. I like running. I did an ultra marathon. I had a bunch more signed up but then they all got canceled. I did one right before the shutdown. I like to rock climb. I liked to lift weights. I like to create things. I like to read. I do have a level of intensity about me. I love it and hate it. It drives me but it also sometimes can pull me.

David Poole
Sure.

Magnus Johnson
And so, I think that I’m at my best and calm and centered outside in the woods, moving through the woods. There’s something about moving and being outside. I’m under less stress under stress.

David Poole
When you grew up in a stressful environment and you had to be resourceful, and like you said, you had to pay attention and you had to grow up fast in that kind of environment. What are you binge watching during the COVID lockdown?

Magnus Johnson
Like TV?

David Poole
Yeah.

Magnus Johnson
Ah, no. No.

David Poole
[crosstalk 004517]. That was a trick question.

Magnus Johnson
Yeah, yeah, yeah. But I do have … So, my wife watches shows, as you know. But then, she’ll get onto my feed like every feed is based on what you watched, it suggests … Mine’s very odd, you know what I mean? There’s weird documentaries and then stupid 80s movies and then things on Gaia and it’s this very weird, odd, fake-

David Poole
Are you a Breakfast Club fan? Is that what you’re watching from the 80s?

Magnus Johnson
Yeah. I’ll watch Waterworld every night. Every night, I watch Waterworld because it brings me comfort. No. I don’t have a show. I’ve had shows. I like Tolkien, Tolkien. I like The Hobbit.

David Poole
Oh, yeah. Sure.

Magnus Johnson
I like that kind of stuff.

David Poole
That’s a lonely three hours. I’m sure your wife is not interested in Hobbits and Middle Earth.

Magnus Johnson
No, but he was friends with Joseph Campbell, I think, or no, was it C.S. Lewis? I don’t know but that whole era, World War One, this great existential change. And so, but yeah, if I’m going to nerd out, it’s definitely going to be Hobbits and Lord of the Rings. I’ll have these mini-Winter depressions and you’ll know because I’ve rewatched The Hobbit.

David Poole
What book are you reading now?

Magnus Johnson
Man! I got a bunch. I’ll get them here. Okay. So, these are the new ones. I kind of went through a batch and now I’m on the new ones. I got The Language of Creation that I’m going to read, The Secret of the Golden Flower, the Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ, written by Maximus the Confessor, Embodied Spirituality in a Sacred World, and Biocentrism.

David Poole
Yeah. Light reading, I see.

Magnus Johnson
Yeah. I mean, this stuff, NuCalm, biohacking, thinking, reading, researching, communicating. I love it. I do it all the time. I do it for fun. I do it for free. I do it for pay. It’s what I do with my kids, with my wife, with myself and yeah, I just, I really, really enjoy it. I think for a fun, I might listen to different podcasts or something. I listen to some different shows on a podcast, it’s probably lighter. But yeah, that’s an extra on the books.

David Poole
Have you thought about teaching as a next career path and adjunct professor and talking to young Millennials who don’t have it figured out?

Magnus Johnson
I don’t think they’d want to talk to me. They do and they don’t. It’s kind of weird. Yeah. One of my old professors reached out to me to ask if I wanted to talk to their class of … I think they’re going to get a master’s in social work. I do like teaching. I do like learning. I don’t know if I like it in the context of academia.

David Poole
Yeah. But even if they don’t want to hear from you, they need to hear from you. I would definitely call them back and say, “Yeah. Give me two hours of these punks.”

Magnus Johnson
I talk about the younger people and there’s things that are frustrating, but I think the human spirit’s the same. You put on layers. You put on ideas. You put on cultures. You put on feelings. You put on perspectives. You put on all these different things, but we want to love, be loved. We want to know the truth and we want to do it in community. And I try to focus on that and we all go through whether it’s existentialism or post-modernism or nihilism or … There’s always a new thing, but at the end of the day, we all agree there’s a problem and we’re all looking for different ways to solve it and it’s awkward and violent and confusing, but this spirit of it is I think that. At least that’s what I believe.

David Poole
Excellent. Well, Magnus, I really appreciate your sharing tonight and I am a big fan of your truth and I admire your intensity and I’m glad I’m not opposing you on the battlefield because I wouldn’t trust my chances, but I’d like to open it up for questions from the audience. I think you should run for office, Magnus.

Magnus Johnson
No way!

David Poole
I honestly do.

Magnus Johnson
There’s no way, man.

David Poole
The Ron Kovic Phenomenon. He didn’t win in New York, but he should have.

Magnus Johnson
No.

David Poole
No questions?

Magnus Johnson
No questions.

Cheryl
I have a question.

Magnus Johnson
Oh, okay.

Jim
Magnus-

Magnus Johnson
Hi, Cheryl.

Cheryl
I have a question. Magnus, how often do you use NuCalm?

Magnus Johnson
I don’t use it every day and there’s a … I want to use it every day. I have a desire to use it every day but I like to use all kind of things every day. And so, I purposely try to build up myself as much as possible to not be co-dependent on anything but to use support when I need them.

Magnus Johnson
So, I use NuCalm today because I didn’t get enough sleep but when it comes to just the habit of using NuCalm, I’d rather develop my own meditation practice literally by the sitting and keeping my back straight and trying to meditate, but depending on my stress levels, flareup of TBI, PTSD, or other things that are going on, I’ll increase the use of NuCalm so that I’m not going off the rails, but when I’m on the rails, I don’t want to keep using it and using it and using it because I think I would end up abusing it a little bit. Not sleeping, using it to rest, supplementing my sleep every day. I think that would be my nature. So, I try to hem myself in a little bit.

Cheryl
So, your trust in NuCalm is within a spectrum that you’re sensing now I’ll use it, now I won’t?

Magnus Johnson
No. I think people should use NuCalm every day. I think it’s good for them. My nature is to abuse things, use things all the time, always, instead of developing my own meditation practice and having my own discipline and learning to engage my diaphragm and building this pyramid of calm focus, being able to have my own power, instead of focusing on building that, I will get the best supplements and then I’ll lift more and I have a hard time with moderation. And so that’s my thing and I moderate even with really great things because I feel that’s what I need to do, but with other people that we, with R+R, I want them to use NuCalm as much as possible.

Cheryl
So, could you reiterate what R+R is? Relax and rejuvenate?

Magnus Johnson
Resiliency and recovery. It’s the program I’ve created for veterans-

Cheryl
Nice.

Magnus Johnson
… on Mission 22. So, I use NuCalm and there’s been periods where I’ve used it a lot and there’s been periods where I’ve used a lot of things a lot to get over, through bad spells, but I want to get to a point where I’m creating everything I need with what I believe to be God and my own body and my own breath and that’s my ultimate goal is to just not need a supplement and not need to do these things just to be free.

Magnus Johnson
Now, is that going to be done? I don’t know, but you could argue that all you need a supplementation because the food itself is devoid of minerals and all these different things. You could argue that because of the internet and the computers and all that, that NuCalm is the thing that you need to do all the time because you can’t ever achieve the parasympathetic like you used to be able to do before the world got so advanced. There’s all the different things to figure out. I just know, for me, I want to use things in moderation and I’ll use them more or less depending on what the other outside stimuli is and what’s going on within me, but I try not to get too rigid on being habitual about certain things because I can be … My habits, my rituals can become not the thing that’s freeing me, but the thing that I’m … It inverses, because I’ll get up at 400. I’ll go on a run. I’ll do NuCalm. I’ll take supplements. I’ll do boom, boom, boom, boom, boom. But, then, if you alter my regimen, I won’t be nice to you, even though I’m doing the regimen so that I’m nicer.

Cheryl
So, how long have you used NuCalm from beginning till now?

Magnus Johnson
I’ve had it and use it for a couple years. I would say about a couple years, wouldn’t you say, David, that I’ve been working with Jim, yeah? About two years?

David Poole
Yeah. I think nearly three years.

Magnus Johnson
Near three? Yeah.

David Poole
Yeah. Last year was [crosstalk 005554], huh?

Jim
Two years, five months.

Magnus Johnson
Yep. Yep. So, and Jim, I’ve asked you for refills quite often.

Jim
I know. Your intensity and demand for it, just like you spoke to. You kind of know when you need it and you know when you don’t.

Magnus Johnson
Yeah, yeah. But, again, that’s for me. But I think that I would be excited to use NuCalm on a daily basis. I would use it on a daily basis. I just know myself that I need to [crosstalk 005625].

David Poole
I wonder, Magnus, if it’s almost the … From our discussion tonight, it’s clear to me that you need to be involved in the process and believe the process. And when you do NuCalm, you’re along for the ride. You’re kind of a passenger going into your subconscious. When you’re in meditation, it’s all about being involved [crosstalk 005643].

Magnus Johnson
I know I need to achieve that theta, that parasympathetic state and sometimes I can’t do it and sometimes I can, but if I don’t practice on achieving it myself, I never will without something, but if I don’t have the support of NuCalm, I might not be able to achieve it either because I’ve got all these other things so to me, it’s something to do in tandem. This is my personal opinion. For me is use NuCalm and develop a meditation practice and link them together.

Erika
Magnus, we have a couple of newbies on the call and Normina is asking, “Could you share what track you use, how long you NuCalm, what time of day you NuCalm?”

Magnus Johnson
Yeah. I’ve been using Rescue and I NuCalm for what I need. Today, I did it. I got up at 300 in the morning today and I NuCalmed at around noon. And when I came to, it was about half an hour. Sometimes, it’s longer. Sometimes, it’s shorter. I try to do what I need. Around noon is sort of when I need it, pre [inaudible 005810] because I can end up sort of just drinking more coffee, but that’s not good. So, I try to do it around noon so that I’m not relying of stimulants that I’ve got the midday type of thing, but it depends on sort of the flow state I’m in because sometimes, I’m working longer hours and I’ll NuCalm more or sometimes I don’t. Life’s pretty simple. I’m not revving it out. I may be … How do I say this? PTSD and TBI can be really bad and overwhelming and I might need it all the time. I need to get into that state because you can never can achieve it naturally. You don’t sleep. When you sleep, your body’s not regenerating. You’re not reaching deep sleep. So, depending on these other variables is when I’ll increase or decrease the NuCalm, so but if I had to say when I will do, it’ll be around noon and be from 30 minutes to 40 minutes so yeah.

Erika
No, that’s very helpful. And we have a question from Brian. “When you served in stressful environments, what mental tactics did you use to stay present and focused?”

Magnus Johnson
This is crazy. I used to put a circle inside a triangle. That’s what I … So, visually in my mind and no one taught me this and I had no idea now that I’ve done some more esoteric reading or whatever. There’s other stuff out there, but in my mind, in combat, bullets start flying, mouth is dry. Scared, fear, tunnel vision, overwhelmed, I would do this sort of internal … It’s like a video game or fighting jet fighter, like the lock-on. I would put a circle inside a triangle and be, and then this is the seat of my soul. I am here. This is happening. But I must be in this centered position, fully accepting what’s happening and be aware of it and look at it.

Magnus Johnson
So, visually, I would breathe, I would accept, I would recommit my life to the task at hand and I would put the circle in the triangle somewhere in my psyche and then I would fully engage what’s happening. I would let go of my life after affirming it. I don’t know if that’s the right thing to do or not. I’m just saying that’s what I did.

Erika
No. I like how you had an answer right away. You knew exactly where you’re going with that.

Magnus Johnson
I do it rock climbing. I tried to do it before this call. It’s like, “Okay.” There’s just something about my soul, my body are integrated, I’m connected, I’m choosing to be here, I’m accepting it, and I’m participating in it, and I’m not in control of everything, but I’m responsible for my part in it, and I can only do it if I’m conscious, engaged, and committed and I let go of fear.

Erika
Yeah.

Magnus Johnson
Yeah.

Erika
Thanks for that. We have another question from Cheryl. She’s asking, “Have you ever integrated both manual therapies and NuCalm together?” I don’t know if that’s personally or in your R+R [crosstalk 010147].

Magnus Johnson
Manual therapy. Are you a counselor? Are you licensed? Yeah.

Jim
Yes.

Cheryl
Trained ecotherapist?

Magnus Johnson
Yeah.

Cheryl
Or whatever [inaudible 010156] that we used.

Magnus Johnson
So, I’ve gone to school. I got a bachelor’s in behavioral science. A lot of my friends are psychologists and counselors. I have some mentors that are psychologists. And I was thinking about including therapy practices in R+R but I’m not quite sure because, again, therapy and coaching are different but they share a sort of a same kind of path. And so with a veteran, it’s a little tricky.

Magnus Johnson
So, how do I say this? So counselors talking to me, I have a different world view, a different belief system, conditioning and things I feel and the things I’ve trained and the way I’ve lived is not exactly the norm, but there are some counselors who work specifically with veterans who get it, who understand it. They know the language. They’re with you but there’s a lot of counselors that are not. They want to be. They hope to be, but they just don’t really understand, because I mean, very few people do.

Magnus Johnson
And so, it would have to be the right counselor with the right intention, the right training, the right background and the right positioning of who they are as a healer, a good listener, not necessarily a … We got veterans that come to us that are on 20 different medications and they got all those medications from doctors and counselors. They’re strung out, they’re addicted, they need medications for other medications and so on and so forth. And I’m not a doctor. I can’t say what they should or they shouldn’t have those medications. All I know is, when people are eating right, in community, telling the truth, being heard, and with a focus and a goal and support on that journey, they tend to need less medications.

Magnus Johnson
So, I think it would take a mature counselor with a lot of experience with lawyers but a desire to help someone, some veteran not shed their warrior identity but fully integrate it and those are special counselors that are hard to find. So, it’s a longer, complicated answer but … Do you understand, Cheryl, or you have a different vernacular than I do with your background?

Cheryl
Oh, I totally respect the words that came out of your mouth. Not everybody can listen to a veteran. If they’re not trained to respect the unconditional and listen within to be in the present with neutralness, you’re not going to get the same outcome and having worked with NuCalm for the last seven years, as a cranial sacral therapist, there’s a deep respect because my resolve to work with veterans and intensives, I find that veterans don’t want to talk about places they’ve been and things that they’ve seen, but they’re in the present left with where they are today and trying to integrate theirselves back into their family, back into the world, back into day-to-day life, still being warriors.

Cheryl
So, what I’ve experienced with NuCalm is that every day that NuCalm gets used, that that brain gets a nice replenishment of cerebral spinal fluid which is insidious when it comes to healing because whether it had been large explosions or concussions or brain and spinal cord trauma or whatever the loudness was in that audio system that was taken in whether visually or auditorily or impacted physically, that body, mind, and spirit needs a daily bath of cerebral spinal fluid and NuCalm is able to do that in three to five minutes.

Cheryl
So, you can supplement all day long, in my opinion, with many things, but when it comes to the issues being in the tissues, which is what a cranial sacral therapist is trained to listen to, putting the two together is profound because it’s not how much one knows. It’s about how much one cares and from here to there, the bottom line is nobody really cares about what I know. They want to know how they’re going to feel at the other end of it, how they going to function, and what is the longevity of that functioning that’s going to come to heart on a daily basis, because when you been through trauma, it’s … I hear a thousand voices screaming and the loudest one is me.

Cheryl
Well, in that essence of trauma, how do we calm down the me and I found that, as a therapist, I’m trained to work with people with somatic emotional issues and being able to facilitate, feel it in the tissues first of all, not have my own agenda but be listening to your inner physician because that’s the doctor on the table. When I have NuCalm on my client while I’m working, it gets their head out of the way. They don’t have to think about the issues. The issues that are flowing to and fro, back and forth in that library of one’s mind. Your inner physician’s going to throw out what’s ringing the loudest.

Cheryl
When you put NuCalm on, you might be seven ways to Sunday in many different places because that’s where life’s got you. A lot of things are happening, but the old memories that are sitting in the background that are still vibrating very loud that tend to trip people up in the trying to come back to everyday life is the one that needs to be quieted down the most. And NuCalm, from what I have experienced both from concussion, post-traumatic stress, sleep disorders, and addictions, personally and profoundly is it’s the therapists that protects us from the rest of the day when it’s included with manual therapy, that issue that’s underlying that nobody wants to talk about or bring back up again is the one that’s lingering the loudest. It’s the trash that never gets emptied but-

Magnus Johnson
Yeah. What you resist, persists.

Cheryl
Exactly. But underlying that proverbial stink from the trash that hasn’t been emptied is still there on a daily, 24-hour basis. People that, if they’re not smelling it, they’re thinking it. If they’re not thinking it, they feel it. If it doesn’t pass by because that emotional vibration is rolling through the tissues is still vibrating very loudly.

Magnus Johnson
Well, it’s literally in the tissue. I read this book, The Body Keeps the Score, and that’s part of our programs. People can read that but it’s literally the trauma’s in ourselves.

Cheryl
The trauma is in the tissue and the brain is the big boss. NuCalm ultimately seduces that big boss down to calm, to neutral and the longer we’re in neutral, the longer we can use our own conscious thought process to say, “Hmm. You know what? I’m not there now. That was then. I have an ability, I have control.” So whether it be addiction or sleep disorders or what have you, NuCalm is that daily dose of this is what you need now because it’s a cumulative and that brain and the glial cells, the neurons and the dendrites are being supplemented with cerebral spinal fluid which is what ends up getting compressed through a huge explosion or an intermittent moment of [inaudible 011028] that happens and every time you use NuCalm, it’s like it just initiates that subtle healing profoundly and it’s a cumulative.

Cheryl
So, with all due respect, your answer was awesome, absolutely awesome. You’re right. Not just anybody can sit down and put their hands on somebody and say, “Oh, well. I can fix this.” It’s not about that. But working with the brain and being able to … and I look at NuCalm as an amazing therapist. As a cranial sacral therapist studying brain and spinal cord trauma, you put NuCalm day to day back to [inaudible 011112] hands on, hands off, and I’m doing the same, but NuCalm is an amazing helper that facilitates that place that says, “You know what? Maybe I didn’t want to sit here and talk about that with my therapist but in my mind’s eye, I’m able to actually feel it, see the flashback while I’m under NuCalm but yet I know I’m safe. I was there then but I’m here now.” And to be able to look at that impact, that sound, that whether it has a shape, a color, an emotion, that vibration to feel it drop down and be facilitated more into neutral helps everybody take that big deep breath and those cells come together back a little bit more to where they were beforehand, allowing everybody to think better, sleep better, do better and to actually just kind of reconnect with the place within themselves that goes, “I’m not there now but I was there then and it felt like that, so what can I do now?”

Cheryl
So, with a deep respect, I was just wondering if your program was recognizing the benefits between NuCalm, manual therapies, because you have spoken of many different, whether it be nutrition supplements or whatnot, to understand the facilitation between a highly trained cranial sacral therapist that works with brain and spinal cord trauma and understands that the issues are in the tissues alongside with NuCalm to help maintain and lock in that forward strength, that foundational build to refocus, to redirect, continue on, feeling safe and strong within yourself.

Magnus Johnson
The potential to create an integrated system that uses tech, different modalities, counseling, coaching, all these … The potential to create this journey, this transformational journey over time with different healers and mentors, practitioners at different points. There’s a lot of potential for that. I can’t scale those people yet, the practitioners at what you just spoke about but with enough funding, enough traction, enough support, enough evidence, then I can.

Magnus Johnson
So, we’re not there yet but once the data, the quantitative and qualitative datas there and people are excited about it and then they want to get a thumbprint on it, that’ll change and there’ll be more to share and more room and more opportunity and more financing and there’ll be more excitement about it. So, it’s not a no. It’s a not yet.

Cheryl
I have a lot of information to add to that. Not yet, but that’s for another day.

Erika Robinson
We had a question from [Chi 01142e] and Chi, feel free to come on if you want to ask.

Chi
Yep. Hi, Magnus. What advice would you give to a new NuCalm user to build that routine and habit especially in a time crunch society like this?

Magnus Johnson
I would advise 14 days in a row. Get a couple weeks, establish a base and get and 14 days in a row. And then I would advise to look at your stress, look at your deep sleep, look at your REM sleep, and get excited about reducing stress and increasing sleep.

Magnus Johnson
So, when I quit smoking, it wasn’t because I was worried about the health consequences. It’s because I got excited about the health benefits. So, I would suggest two weeks solid, right out the gate, and then what we just had with Cheryl. Use as much as you can afford, use as much as you need.

Magnus Johnson
I kind of have this thing inside of me where I feel what I need, like, “Okay. I need more of this.” I’m starting to … I can feel it when I get a big cortisol dump or I can feel it when I’m like, “Okay. I’ve engaged these other systems. I’m going to pay for that,” if I’m too resentful or I get angry, or I’ll lap … I call it flooding.

Magnus Johnson
So, based on what’s your intention? Is it for performance, is it for restoration, is it for trauma, is it for addiction? Are you trying to just perform better at work. So, there’s a lot of different variables but I think it would be safe and prudent and make sense to say to do, start out and establish a habit for two weeks to a month to actually see and notice and measure the changes. That’s my own personal thing, though but I’m sure David and Jim have the science behind what they’ve discovered.

David Poole
No. What [inaudible 011638] Magnus, is if you do it every day for 10 years, you’ll be in good shape.

Magnus Johnson
Right. There you go.

Jim
That’s be a [crosstalk 011643].

David Poole
That’s our science. I don’t know.

Magnus Johnson
Yeah. Well, it’s like how much should you meditate? All the time. How long should you stay in the parasympathetic? It’s like as much as you need to. But I would say a good thing is develop a 14-day to 30-day base, so then you have something to compare and contrast to. That would be my answer. That’s what I’m … The wellness coordinator for our program is requesting that veterans that do our program do a 14-day run initially.

Chi
Thank you Magnus. I’m asking questions mainly because I’m from Singapore. So, in these societies, the people don’t request for support or help when they are under stress. Even though tremendous stress. So, psychiatrists … We don’t go to see psychiatrists. We don’t go to see counselor. We don’t want to see psychologist. Those are out.

Chi
So, even if people use NuCalm, they need to use in private. Using it often and tell people that, “I’m on NuCalm, I have to manage my stress,” is a no-no. So, even 14 days, you will get hard to establish because they can only do it before they go to work or after they come back to work. So, that is a societies, culture perspective that … I can still encourage people to start in the morning, to-

Magnus Johnson
Sure.

Chi
… manage their day is hidden.

Magnus Johnson
I mean, like I said in the beginning of this, what we’re doing, my dad is Welsh. He was in after World War Two, growing up in England and Wales. And that culture, at that time, it was a stiff upper lip, you know what I mean? There’s no crime. There’s no special treatment. None of that and I don’t know what it’s like in Singapore but I can relate to that cultural, like we don’t ask for help. We don’t show weakness. And I lived it and I ended up getting PTSD and TBI and having all these other bad habits because I don’t need help. And so, at my best with what I believe, I ended up being to the point where I had to have a ton of help. So, I get it, I think. I know what it’s like for me and my dad in that culture we came from and it’s tough, because if you show weakness, they’ll eat you up. At least I don’t know where you were, but when I was a kid growing up in Wales with my dad and the way they were. If I was an American and I was being a bit posh or I showed any weakness they would kick my butt relentlessly. Yeah. I mean, I’m sure it’s different today but this was when I was a kid.

Magnus Johnson
So, I think I feel what you’re saying. Yeah, and that’s a whole different thing with the cultural stuff, but maybe get in the bathroom and get in the 20-minute NuCalm session at lunch or something. But I mean you got to do what you got to do to kind of turn the corner. Don’t let them see any weakness and then, once you’ve got around, once you roll, then that weakness can become a strength, maybe, depending on the culture and what’s going on, but that’s definitely something that’s real. At least it was real in my life. Same thing in the military, back when I was in the military. You didn’t talk about PTSD. You don’t do these type of … “Okay. Your non-mission essential. Good job.”

Magnus Johnson
Things are different today. Maybe they’ve gone too far the other way today. Maybe it’s good to talk and it’s good to empathize, but sometimes we need to have a little bit of a standard. So, there’s a balance there, but that cultural stuff, that belief, that idea that I don’t ask for help and we’re not weak. That actually made it worse in the long run. It was a deeper hole to dig out of. I don’t regret it. I’m proud of who I am and where I’m from but there’s pros and cons.

Chi
Yeah. Yeah. I appreciate. I didn’t did it in the bathroom, but I actually did it in the car. I have to [crosstalk 012117].

Magnus Johnson
Maybe the car. Yeah.

Chi
I drive to the lowest of the basements, car parks and I would just-

Magnus Johnson
Yeah!

Chi
… did it in the cars to get myself ready to go back to all the presentations.

Magnus Johnson
Yeah. I mean, it’s funny. We’re all pretending that we’re all super tough but we’re all … There’s a bunch of cars down there in the basement, you know what I mean? I mean, in the military, I used to go into the toilet, just to have a moment alone. I mean, we’re talking in the desert porta potties, plastic. The suns beating down on it all day. It stinks, obviously, because a military’s using it for a bathroom, but I would go in there just for a minute to a moment’s peace and we need that. So, you need to find it where you can get it and I think, at least for me, it’s worth risking a little bit of people making fun of me or whatever so that I can actually enjoy my life, because it goes by so fast. But again, I don’t know your culture, but that was my culture.

Chi
Thank you for sharing.

David Poole
Yeah. I think that’s a wrap. Well, Magnus, appreciate the time tonight. It was really remarkable. Appreciate what you’re doing, appreciate all you’ve done, and I’m looking forward to what you’re doing next.

 

 

What Does It Mean To Create Intimacy?

Magnus Johnson, co-Founder of Mission 22 joins the show to share his journey as a veteran participating in the effort to increase mental health for people who have served.

From his experience in the military to working with cohorts of vets like himself, Magnus talks about the path to integrating warriors into their new worlds.

 

“You might not know the right answers, you might not know what you should or shouldn’t do but you must participate. That statement hit me.”

— Magnus Johnson

 

Tune in next week to This Is NuCalm to hear about Magnus Johnson’s beginnings and how 9/11 propelled him into a entirely different life.

 

More About Magnus Johnson, Former Green Beret

Magnus Johnson is an eight-year army Veteran, former Green Beret, family man, writer, and artist. He completed three combat tours, two in Afghanistan and one in Iraq. As President and Co-Founder of Mission 22, a 501(c)3 organization, Johnson leverages his talents, skills, and understanding of warrior psychology to help solve the suicide epidemic engulfing America’s veterans. He is a visionary leader and excellent at forming individualized solutions to large challenges. Johnson has been awarded a Bronze Star Medal for Combat’s actions and a Congressional Record in the Indiana House of Representatives for Service to Country and Community.

Find out more about Magnus on his LinkedIn

Not Good Enough is Just the Starting Point with Bob Reitz

Today’s guest on This Is NuCalm has not only served for our country but is also an avid user of NuCalm. Retired Navy SEAL, Bob Reitz joins David Poole in an inspiring and heartfelt discussion of the trials and tribulations behind SEAL training and the truth about dealing with PTSD.

“You may be able to hold your breath for five minutes, but they want to know how you manage and how you act at five minutes and one second. Do you panic? Do you compete? Do you keep your composure? Do you stay underwater and relax even though you’re a quiet storm inside? All those things matter.”

— Bob Reitz

Tune in to hear Reitz’s personal experience of returning to civilian life and how he has made it his mission to help fellow veterans manage their PTSD.

 

Listen to This Is NuCalm on Apple & Spotify!

 

Bob Reitz, retired U.S, Navy SEAL, spent 23 years in the Navy, with the last 16 years as an officer in the SEAL Teams.

 



Key Takeaways

[1:00] David welcomes a long-time friend, Navy SEAL, hero, all-around awesome human and asks him to share the story of how he came to serve.

 

[5:23] The people who make it to SEAL training need to really want to do it — there is a 75% to 85% drop-out rate! Bob shares some of the grueling trials and training required.

 

[8:31] Bob shares some of his deployments, what they have meant, and the fundamental mission difference between pre- and post-9/11.

 

[13:56] Six to seven months of constant sympathetic drive is not something your body or mind is used to recuperating from, but it’s part of the job. Bob shares the hurdles of hypervigilance experience as well as the hardships of managing the need for control post-deployment.

 

[20:13] Bob shares a personal example of how hypervigilance can show up inappropriately — even backyard camping — in a personal and family relationship setting.

 

[22:11] Growing with a tightly knit unit of brothers at arms and developing this uniquely unshakable bond teaches you that life is really about community. Retirement from this context can lead to a profound feeling of loss and Bob shares how some people find relief from this feeling of emptiness.

 

[30:12] PTSD is ugly. And easy to deny. Bob opens up about his Veteran grandfather.

 

[35:55] To put things into perspective, Bob shares what a day in his life is on deployment 24/7 for seven months at a time — from Djibouti to Afghanistan.

 

[40:32] What does Veteran’s day mean to Bob? He also shares advice on how to come back to civilian life.

 

[48:12] From dying on the vine to Bob figuring out the best coping mechanisms for managing his PTSD — including NuCalm.

 

[52:33] Audience questions start with “How do you share this PTSD experience with others?”

 

[58:05] “Have you customized NuCalm for your own optimal experience?”

 

[1:01:52] “TBI and TMJ are causing grinding. Will NuCalm help with this?”

 

[1:07:04] “Bob’s recommendations for getting — and staying — in the zone.”

 

[1:16:30] David thanks Bob for his service, his experience, and for sharing so much of himself.

 

Continue on your journey and until next time, breathe deep, relax, and keep looking forward.

 

Mentioned in this episode

NuCalm

 

More about NuCalm and the podcast

This is NuCalm, the show for those looking to improve sleep quality, manage stress, and boost recovery. Brought to you by Solace Lifesciences, the makers of NuCalm, the world’s only patented and proven neuroscience technology that works within minutes, without drugs, every time! In over one million medical sessions, NuCalm has helped men and women around the world.

 

NuCalm: stress relief for the way we live today, technology to help you disconnect.


Full Transcript

David Poole
I’m really pleased, very honored, and Bob and I have known each other for several years. He’s been with the company now for over a year. Tonight, what I’d like to do is focus not on Bob’s deployments and the action and all the cool things that we want to know from heroes but really on the reality.

David Poole
One of the hard parts for Bob and we’ll talk about how he got involved with NuCalm, is assimilating back into civilian life and playing that game, especially when you’re trained to do something completely different and you’re equipped to do something different and you’re conditioned over time and you change without even knowing it, and then to get back in and go grocery shopping and take care of the kids, make sure the dishes are done, the laundry is done, and things that we think are important, not necessarily mission critical, become challenging for people like Bob who are not control freaks. They’re conditioned to being in control. Bob is very personal, very private. I’m sure we’ll have questions that he would like to maintain that privacy and we’ll just ask him to say pass.

David Poole
With that, Bob, if you wouldn’t mind, I like to start these conversations by share with us your life journey from the earliest memory to how you became interested in serving and what that was like.

Bob Reitz
I grew up in Southern California. I was an athlete. I played sports my whole life. Went to high school, played football, track, the whole deal. Normal childhood. Spent my time at the beach in Newport Beach and enjoyed my life there.

Bob Reitz
What really focused me in on moving towards the military was my oldest brother Tony, who had a dream to fly jets and never realized it. When I was 20, I was stuck in a job, it was a good job, and they wanted to bring me in. It was at that point I decided I was going to make a change. I joined the Navy and with some goal of getting commissioned and becoming a pilot, of all things, I thought that’s what I wanted to do. Top Gun had just come out and it looked sexy. Then I learned what pilots did and it wasn’t as sexy as it sounded. In fact, the flying got in the way of the day job from what I understand.

Bob Reitz
There was not much in the media or just out there about Seals. It was very quiet. There were never any movies, there were never any discussions. The closest I knew about Seals, the closest thing that I ever heard was one of my best friends had a neighbor who went to Bud’s and he was in training and that was the end of it.

Bob Reitz
It wasn’t until I joined the Navy and was working overseas, I was fixing submarines at the time in the Navy and Seals came off the boat. I was miserable, I didn’t like my job, I got suckered into it, and saw those guys and they seemed like me.

Bob Reitz
I wanted to learn about it. I did. I figured it out. I got a scholarship to college and got a degree and started my path on becoming a Seal. Come to find out, they wanted you to get good grades, they wanted you to be an athlete, they wanted you to be well rounded and be able to make good decisions.

Bob Reitz
At the end of the day, I ended up getting selected, which was a scary thought because you fight, fight, fight to get there and then all of a sudden you’re going and you realize, “I’m going. I have to go to Bud’s and get through this training.”

Bob Reitz
I was lucky enough to get selected and ended up going to training in 1996. It wasn’t perfect for me. A lot of guys get through in six months. I got pneumonia and my lungs bled. I went to the hospital and ended up six days in the hospital and healing and rolled to the next class and ended up on an 11 month journey to get through Bud’s. Then following Bud’s, we ended up going to advanced training, getting through that, going to a Seal team and starting the job.

Bob Reitz
That’s how I got there. I don’t know if you want me to keep going but that’s essentially how I got to the Seal teams and started the journey and got welcomed into the brotherhood of this great community of the Seals.

David Poole
Excellent. That’s a great start. A couple of questions. How many people get invited and how many people make it through generally?

Bob Reitz
It’s not so much that you get invited. We don’t invite anybody. What we’re looking for is the volunteer, we’re looking for somebody who wants to actually do it and has given it thought. There are no invitations. What it is is people apply, they want to come, and, for instance, my class started with 225 people. We graduated 38. On average, that’s the case. It’s about an 75%, 85% drop rate depending. We’ve had whole classes not make it through training. I think there’s one that didn’t make it through training.

Bob Reitz
For the most part, it usually is about 38 guys, 38 to 40 guys no matter what. They’ve done a lot of research on figuring out how to get people through. It’s difficult to pin a finger on it. You might look at the class and think that you’re going to pick guys and that guy will make it, that guy will make it, that guy will make it and you will be wrong every single time. You never know because it’s personal.

David Poole
Can you share with us some of the tests, some of the trials, a little bit of flavor for the Bud’s training?

Bob Reitz
Sure. We talked about this a little bit, Amy, you and I, we talked about … A lot of people think that Seals are these great big, strong guys that can do anything and often times, those are the first guys that quit. Often times it’s because they’ve never been challenged. They’ve never been in a place where they’ve failed. Everything about Seal training is failure. Failure every single day, not measuring up, not being able to satisfy one single instructor. I don’t care if you run a three minute mile, they’ll tell you, “That’s great. I hope you beat it tomorrow.” That’s how training is because that’s what we’re looking for.

Bob Reitz
We talked a little bit about the underwater drills and being a Seal is being comfortable in the water. I told you guys about knot tying and holding your breath and Amy asked me … I see you, Amy, you’re on my page. “How long can you hold your breath?” It doesn’t matter. I was surprised [inaudible 000712] does not matter because in Seal training what they care about is you may be able to hold your breath for five minutes but they want to know how long and how you manage and how you act at five minutes and one second. Do you panic? Do you compete? Do you keep your composure? Do you stay in the water and relax even though you’re a quiet storm inside? All those things matter.

Bob Reitz
That’s really what we care about, we care about how you respond when you’re at failure, when you have reached your limit, and that’s really what we look for in training, as we talked about.

David Poole
That’s scary. We already know that you’re calm under pressure.

Bob Reitz
You heard me yell today.

David Poole
That’s easy. Can you talk a little bit about some of your deployments and what it meant to you?

Bob Reitz
Sure. I come from a … There’s some guys that have come into the Seal teams that have only known war. I entered the Seal teams in 1996 and we weren’t at war. There’s a pre-war and post … Pre-9/11 and post-9/11 deployment. Some of the guys that came in post-9/11 don’t understand and don’t … There was a different mission at the time. It was a foreign internal defense, it was a mission of training other nations, making friends with other nations with the thought of down the road if we ever need to springboard from that nation, we have friends in the neighborhood.

Bob Reitz
There’s pre and post. The pre-9/11 deployments were mostly really just a good deal for the most part. You get to go to a lot of different places. You, essentially, see the world in the Navy. Post-9/11 is different. They’re very long grinds. They can be anywhere between six to 15 months, depending on where you are and who you’re deployed with.

Bob Reitz
For me, personally, pre-9/11, I went all over the world and saw great places, typical Navy career. Post-9/11, you go to not so savory places. Post-9/11, went to Djibouti, Africa, and worked there in a place where we were pretty much the second platoon in country. There was one platoon before us from Seal Team 3, a good friend of mine, classmate managed to go there just before we did but we were tasked with setting up. It turned out we went into Djibouti, Africa to do some training. We were going to shoot [inaudible 001010], communicate, do all the fun stuff and then we stayed and it was difficult. It was a difficult deployment because all my guys wanted to get into Afghanistan. They wanted to go into the fight but we couldn’t. We had to stay where we were.

Bob Reitz
The thing that we talked about earlier was we knew there were terrorists in town, we were deployed right about halftime in the setup to get into Iraq, and so what essentially happened was we trained, trained, trained, we’re supposed to move into Afghanistan but we didn’t. There were terrorists in town from Al Qaeda networks. We knew where they were, we knew that they were surveilling us. We were aware of them but we weren’t allowed to go get them.

Bob Reitz
Part of the conversation of tonight is discussing how I get to where I am personally today from those encounters and those encounters, what they do to you is when you’re in a place like Africa, in Djibouti, for instance, the people are very much peaceful. They’re a nomadic people but they are not our enemies. They’re are enemies in town. The problem is you can’t tell who is who.

Bob Reitz
That really was the impetus for us to constantly stay vigilant. Whenever my guys … We always had to go out in town where literally there was 15 of us … Well, 22 in my platoon and a couple that were in the embassy that were doing comms and we had to live and move amongst the people. If you could imagine, a Seal platoon is 22 guys that look like they’re on a football team and we’re very easy to identify and the bad guys know who we are, they know where we are, they know what we look like. We stand out. We are easy targets.

Bob Reitz
It wasn’t until one of my guys, one of my leadership guys came to me and asked me to write a paper, a letter for him to the VA kind of explaining our situation in Africa. He was my number one guy, he was the guy who ran my boys, he was my LP, what we call a leading petty officer. He was a good, good friend. I’ve known him since the early days of training.

Bob Reitz
He was working with the VA to get the full diagnosis for PTSD. Really, at the end of the day, what we were dealing with was an unknown enemy. We didn’t know who was bad. We didn’t know who was good. We didn’t know if we were going to get shot that day, we were getting blown up that day, we didn’t know anything and what that does to you, at least in that situation, is it puts you on hyper alert. You’re on hyper alert for seven straight months in country.

Bob Reitz
That was that deployment. We went from Djibouti, Africa to the Philippines. The Philippines is a similar country. There are bad guys there. There are assassins. They will shoot you. They have different motives but we’re not allowed to go get them. It makes things difficult. It’s those encounters … I did Djibouti, Philippines, Afghanistan, and all the fun places. It’s not the good places in Philippines. It’s the Muslim [inaudible 001343] where all the fighting happens and occurs.

Bob Reitz
That’s kind of the gist of it. For the bad places.

David Poole
Bob, can you talk a little bit about your personal life pre-deployment? This is one of the things that I think is really important for people to understand is you’re a normal guy, you’re trained to do a job, you want to do a job, you’re willing to serve, you get deployed. You don’t get to choose your deployment. Like you just said, six to seven months of constant sympathetic drive … Not paranoia but paying attention all the time. Then you come home, greet your family, and then what happens?

Bob Reitz
Yeah. Dysfunction. Dysfunction happens. What ends up happening for the guys, and this is anybody, this isn’t just a Seal team. This is everybody in the military, especially folks that are deployed. Everybody is different. We on the teams, we get a lot more training. We’re expected to do a lot more hard stuff and we’re expected to endure a lot more hard stuff.

Bob Reitz
What ends up happening is you’re hyper-vigilant. My guy, who I was just telling you about, Africa, going out, he’s got to go out in town, [inaudible 001502] lots of people, we eat amongst the people because we don’t want to eat MREs every day for 300 straight days. We want to eat food. We risk mad cow. We don’t care. We will eat a steak in town because it’s a steak and it’s not a meal ready to go in a bag.

Bob Reitz
There’s tasks to do, there’s things to do, there’s the embassy to go visit to talk to the ambassador. There’s things that have to be done. That requires us to be in town and to be in town is to not know, to be in town with people that may be terrorists or may not be terrorists is to be hyper-vigilant.

Bob Reitz
That’s the dysfunction. Dysfunction that we deal with is hyper-vigilance. We end up constantly … We always say keep your head on swivel. The guys, they go out, they’re constantly vigilant, they’re always carrying weapons, they’re ready to go at a moment’s notice.

Bob Reitz
Then you come home and when you come home, you come home to a family, if you’re married, and to a wife that is, well, one, managing everything and handling it. You have to, one, be quiet, keep your mouth shut, don’t make any big changes. I got this advice from a Seal chief, which is one of our senior [inaudible 001625], don’t leave a trace when you come home because your wife will have it handled. You don’t want to come home and make big changes or you’ll be out the door again.

Bob Reitz
What ends up happening is you come home and you try to do normal life and what ends up being the case is that you’re hyper-vigilant. You’re hyper-vigilant with children. You’re hyper-vigilant with your family. You’re hyper-vigilant where you go but you don’t need to be but you don’t really have a way to control it or stop it.

Bob Reitz
I talk to a lot of guys about this, that we deal with, and what it transforms into is lack of sleep, trying to control situations. We talked a little bit about this, controlling your surroundings. When you’re in Africa or you’re in Afghanistan or you’re in Philippines or Mexico City, for me, when I traveled there, there’s bad guys all around you, you know they’re watching you, and you can’t do anything about it. You can’t control the situation.

Bob Reitz
When you’re home, you feel less control. You want to control everything. You, I’m sure, can figure out how that goes over. Not very good. Hence, the dysfunction.

David Poole
Give us examples. Today we talked about … When you talked about [inaudible 001750] patrol, what happens in my room, what happens in my kitchen, what happens in my yard, what happens in my garage, what happens in my car, and that becomes your domain and it becomes almost your new obsession.

Bob Reitz
You know, I think the best thing for people to understand is that because we come from a point of no control, you never know what’s going to happen, you never know who is good, who is bad. You never know if the flight you’re on is going to get shot. You never know if you’re going to crash. You never know if you’re going to end up in a bad situation.

Bob Reitz
You try to control everything. For me, it’s always been … It’s an interesting thing because I think about it a lot, having just got divorced in April, again, which is a really significant thing in the Seal teams. We just eat marriages alive, either because of deployments and time away or just the way we act when we come home.

Bob Reitz
It’s about control. For me, you can get paralyzed in doing something. For instance, I’m supposed to make sales. You called me today, “I make sales.” You know, for a guy that’s been through what we’ve been through, that doesn’t have control, will … I’ll look around and, to me, the dishes are in the sink, I’m like, “I got to get those dishes. I got to get the dishes clean. Then I got to clean the house.” Everything is in place and then once it’s in its place, then I can sit down and I feel good because we’re trying to create a safe place for control where we’ve lived in a place for years while on deployment where we don’t have control.

Bob Reitz
That’s really the significant thing and that creates dysfunction in the home when you have a wife that isn’t worried about the dishes and she’s not worried about stuff being thrown around the house. She’s worried about happy children. She’s worried about good encounters and experiences. Where you come home and you’re worried about, “Why aren’t the dishes put away? Why isn’t the house clean?” That creates dysfunction and it creates distress in relationships.

Bob Reitz
If you don’t recognize that, before you know it, you’ll have torn through another one and another one and another one. That’s kind of the difficulties of coming home. I’ll give you an example. I told you this today but I’ll share it.

Bob Reitz
It’s the hyper-vigilance. For us to sleep, to protect the family, we go from being with our platoon mates, who we love and revere and would fight to the death for, to coming home back to our family and it translates and the next thing you know, you’re looking to care for your family and protect your family and that hyper-vigilance gets shifted to a new target.

Bob Reitz
I gave you an example of being in the backyard. My wife and children wanted to camp in the backyard and what do I do? We get the tent setup, we get everything setup, and I live in Colorado and we have bears and we have lions and we have raccoons and bad things that come and will eat you. What do I say to them? Just before we lay down, I say, “Hey, listen, quick brief, when the bear comes, if it comes, I need you guys over here because I’m going to shoot the bear from here.” I’m already going through contingencies of how to handle situations because that’s what we’re taught. We’re taught to go through contingencies. On any mission, on any target, on anything. My wife looks at me like, “Are you crazy?” My children don’t want to camp anymore and I create issues. That’s the kind of thing that gets in the way of normalcy. Yeah.

David Poole
Well, here’s the crazy thing, Bob, that’s perfectly normal for you. [inaudible 002204] really uncomfortable if you didn’t do a quick brief and everybody knew the exit plan if something bad goes down, right?

Bob Reitz
That’s what we do. Yeah.

David Poole
I appreciate you sharing that. I totally understand. With the kids, especially, I’ve got two sons, one of the things that really used to drive me crazy, my older son used to get bullied. There’s not a lot you can do and all I wanted to do was snap necks.

Bob Reitz
Yes.

David Poole
A trail of blood and I’ll solve the problem, it’s real easy, it’ll take me about 30 seconds.

Bob Reitz
Yes.

David Poole
Can you talk for a moment … You mentioned about your brothers in arms and serving with them and we would die for them. Can you talk about giving that up when you come back? No one can relate to the intensity of the experiences you have and then all of a sudden they’re gone and you’re just alone with your crazy thoughts trying to take care of people who don’t recognize you anymore.

Bob Reitz
That’s a really good point. I had a conversation with a customer this afternoon. She is a very Type A athlete and she got a little anxiety when COVID happened. We recognized today during our conversation that we had similarities. I’ll explain those to you.

Bob Reitz
One thing you find out … You never really know what you’re going to get when you become a Seal. You don’t know because it wasn’t a lot out there when I became a Seal. It’s an evolution of learning literally every day, especially … No matter what level you’re at on Seal teams, in that kind of organization, you’re constantly learning. You are responsible and accountable to everyone, even the lowest ranking guy, you’re accountable to each other.

Bob Reitz
What that really is is when you become a Seal, you think one thing, you think, “I’m going to be a Navy Seal. I get this trident and this team and we’re going to go get bad guys.” Then what you learn each day and more and more is that it’s really not about that. It’s about the community. What makes the Seal team so strong is really the community. It’s that brotherhood. It’s those guys that you would lay down and die for, that you would fight to the bitter end for each person next to you and they would do the same for you in a heartbeat.

Bob Reitz
That’s what makes the Seal teams so strong. That’s what makes us such a formidable enemy to the bad guys. What ends up happening is you learn along the way that it really is truly about our community. It’s about the people that we get to be with every single day. It’s about being surrounded by literally the top 1% of overachievers every single moment of your life.

Bob Reitz
As an officer on the Seal teams, which was a full-blown privilege and an honor … I always say I served these guys. You get to know each person, each Seal, each person in your platoon, in your care, in your command, whatever it is, however you’re connected to them, it’s this brotherhood of connection and family that you would literally fight to the death for and they would for you.

Bob Reitz
Fast-forward to retirement and leaving these Seal teams and leaving the Navy … I would argue that this is the same for most everybody in the military. We talked a little bit about your son, Dave, the Marine Corps has no less connection, no less commitment, no less brotherhood. It’s the same. It’s the same in the military. Because we go in harm’s way, I think that there’s a bond that happens with people that is unique and it’s powerful and it’s strong.

Bob Reitz
What happens to us when we leave is we’re lost. I moved to Colorado Springs to do a joint tour and end up retiring out of Colorado Springs. There are very few Seals in Colorado Springs. San Diego and Norfolk, Virginia is where we have our bases and we have our really big concentration of Seals.

Bob Reitz
What ends up happening is you lose sight, you lose connection with the brotherhood, and as soon as you get out, you feel this loss. You feel … I’ll just say from my perspective, there’s an emptiness because on a daily basis on the Seal teams, every day we’d wake up, we’d have officers call, we’d go see the guys, we do a great workout together, it’s all competition, everybody fights to win, and then we go about our job and work with each other and go home and come back and do it again. Five days a week. When we’re on deployment, we do it just about every day.

Bob Reitz
You lose that connection and when you lose that connection, it’s almost like, although, you’re still in the brotherhood, you lose connection to the brotherhood. Guys can get depressed. You feel a little lost. You go to work for companies … Like I said, I worked for the Covert Audio and Video Companies and DOD, they’re contracting military contracting companies, for about seven years before I realized how miserable I was and wanted to quit.

Bob Reitz
You find very few people in those communities that are like-minded where in Seal teams, it’s not every person for themselves. It’s how do I help the team? How do we get stronger? How do we get faster? How are we better? How do we kill more bad guys? That kind of thing is what matters. In the corporate world, it’s a little different.

Bob Reitz
What you find is this loss of the brotherhood, you’ve lost that connection. There is no working out. There is no camaraderie. There is no full-blown competition every single day. It’s actually completely different. That creates depression and it creates a loss and it’s difficult to find a replacement for that. Some guys can find it I think if they do particular sports, if they’re in combat sports like Jiu Jitsu. We have a lot of guys that are in Jiu Jitsu and some of my fondest memories are rolling as a novice with some of our really talented Jiu Jitsu guys. I don’t know [inaudible 002911], great guy, one of my platoon mates, and he and another guy in my platoon would school us in Jiu Jitsu. As you know, Dave, you were a wrestler, it’s a whole different level when you’re dealing with an expert.

Bob Reitz
Those guys that find those communities that have that bond of competition and rigor I think excel and continue to excel but if you don’t have that, like most of our guys getting out of the military, then they suffer. They deal with depression and they deal with trying to control things and things like that.

Bob Reitz
That’s some of the challenges of coming back into civilian world, especially after you get out of the military when you’ve been in this community for so long. It really is a community.

David Poole
Bob, one of the saddest things or ironies is they’re trained to be so tough, they’re taught to be tough, they don’t ask for help. I can tell you from the year we’ve had together, you’re still very much in the brotherhood. You call me all the time and say, “Hey, my buddy, this guy, that guy, he needs help.”

Bob Reitz
Yeah.

David Poole
[inaudible 003022] all these guys. They do need help. I already knew going in they need help [inaudible 003031] holy shit, this guy is in a really bad place. Wow. All they did was serve. All they did was sacrifice. All they did was give up everything they had so we could be safe. It’s tragic in that regard. How do you reach out to people and let them know it’s okay? If they don’t get help, they’re going to be in a purgatory of suffering and hell and isolation and depression.

Bob Reitz
Well, that’s the issue, right? For me, two marriages down and, for me, it’s an interesting thing because I would argue anybody in the soft community, whether you’re Special Force, Navy Seal, PJ, combat controller, we’re all taught a certain way of being strong, being tough. Little things can’t bother you.

Bob Reitz
I retired in 2012. Without getting personal, still communicating and talking with my now-ex-wife, she still remembers to the day, “Well, heck no, I don’t have PTSD. I’m fine. I’m fine.” I never crashed. The [inaudible 003148] never really crashed. It landed hard. We thought we were going to crash but we didn’t crash. The plane never crashed. We never got blown up. Nobody got shot next to me. Nobody got their head blown off.

Bob Reitz
For me, I didn’t believe that I deserved even the conversation of PTSD. I think a lot of guys go through life and it manifests and it shows its place. It shows its ugly face and in your life, but coming from our community, we come from a place that is, “Hey, we’re strong. We’re tough. We’re not supposed to have those feelings. We’re not supposed to show weakness. We’re not supposed to have weakness.”

Bob Reitz
What ends up happening is the dysfunction gets bigger and bigger and bigger. Then you end up having to have a come to Jesus moment that, “Hey, maybe there is something going on. Maybe all that control, maybe it’s not just personally who I am that I need things in their place. Maybe it’s a different thing.”

Bob Reitz
With the guys, often times we don’t know why we’re doing what we’re doing. I don’t know if I told you this but my grandpa was in World War Two. Both my dad’s parents were Marines. Mom and Dad. Poor guy. All I knew of my grandpa was that he was a Marine and he drank a lot and he was hard on my dad and his siblings.

Bob Reitz
It wasn’t until my dad’s sister and he showed me … My aunts gave me all of the memorabilia that my grandmother had put together for my grandpa. He’s a World War Two vet and did the island campaign. To bring this home, he was very hard on my dad, he’s a very hard drunk, mean, nasty drunk. It wasn’t until I read those papers, those things that my grandma had put together, the first Purple Heart, shot on the island campaign in the Marshall Islands, then the second Purple Heart, getting blown up and in a place where it was a whole different kind of warfare. It was a warfare of fixing bayonets and up close and personal and the Japanese were no … They were a difficult and very motivated enemy at the time.

Bob Reitz
I told my dad and his sister, my aunt, I said, “I hope this helps you but Grandpa he had PTSD.” Back in those days, we didn’t recognize it, we didn’t talk about it. They literally went and did their job overseas, they came home, and they were told to go back to work and function. Then you see the dysfunction that happens that came from that for our Baby Boomer generation.

Bob Reitz
I told them, I said, “You know, I kid you not, he got blown up, he got shot, he went right back after he healed both times. There was no break. There was no, ‘Thank you for passing GO.’ It was back to the war effort until its over. Then these people were told to come home and function.”

Bob Reitz
For our guys, even our infantry, our guys that walk through town, they see things, they still deal with their trauma, and then they come home and they think they’re supposed to be okay and then they’re not. Then we deal with the 22 guys a day committing suicide because they don’t know how to function within a society again and they haven’t been brought back and they haven’t dealt with the issues that they’ve created overseas, which is no easy task.

Bob Reitz
That’s where you mentioned … I had a great conversation with a gentleman today. He’s a NuCalm user, his wife is a NuCalm user, but he has a family full of veterans and way back to I think even he said World War One. He did not serve but what he does is he takes care of veterans. He cooks meals for veterans. He does his part. He recognizes what they’ve done where others do not.

Bob Reitz
The difficulty, obviously, is coming back and being normal and recognizing where you don’t recognize where you feel like you don’t deserve … I didn’t feel like I deserved PTSD until finally after this divorce and I had to look at … You point a finger, you got three fingers pointing back at you. You got to do some self-reflection and see is the problem with me? I do take some of those responsibility.

David Poole
Bob, if I may share, when we had a conversation a few months ago … You’ve been blessed with an advocate at the VA who has been a very good companion for you, a very good champion, and is doing great work. She helped you come to that resolution. You said, “Yeah, well, she reminded me of that when she read my report …” You started listing off experiences.

Bob Reitz
[crosstalk 003704].

David Poole
I’m listening and I’m like, “Dude, none of that is normal.” One of those could cause PTSD. You listed 10 and we just started the conversation. You’ve had to suppress and you didn’t think about it until you said, “Oh, yeah. When I was on this deployment, here’s how I need to behave, here’s how my training was” and you just do it, that’s your job.

David Poole
I think it’ll help people too to understand a day in the life of a deployment. [inaudible 003732] spent seven months being constantly vigilant. When do you wake up? When do you get briefed? When do you go do your mission? When do you come back? It’s seven days a week, seven months at a time. I don’t think people understand the intensity.

Bob Reitz
It depends where you are. In Africa, it was different. There’s a massive base in Africa in Djibouti now. When we got there, we stayed at a demining camp. I’m talking about a French demining camp from past wars, past things, where the French Foreign Legion … It’s kind of like the French’s last bastion of hope but the French Foreign Legion were still in Djibouti, Africa, which is a whole other problem for my guys.

Bob Reitz
We deployed to Qatar, to the country Qatar, and then went down to … We were on a split deployment with some Special Forces guys. We were going to rotate through Yemen. That was the plan. We setup a trip to go down to Djibouti, Africa because it’s close. It’s close to that theater, it’s close to Yemen. We were going to train. We hadn’t shot. We wanted to get out and do some shooting and get the guys back on the gun.

Bob Reitz
Well, that turned into a straight seven month deployment and we never left. What ended up happening was there was a large buildup and there was a large … Kind of like I told you, I said there we were deployed during the summer. It was kind of like halftime. 9/11 happened, Afghanistan happened, we deployed in April, April to October, very hot times and for whatever reason, we’re smart, we’re not going to go into Iraq in the dead of summer. We’re going to spare the guys that and plus we got to do some planning.

Bob Reitz
Our deployment was spent training, constantly training. We shot millions of bullets. We trained constantly. We did [inaudible 003940] action drills. We built the base for other forces to come and that was a whole goal and, like I said, we were the first guys there. We were never off. The guys were constantly working, staying strong, we were constantly shooting, moving, communicating, doing things that we’re supposed to do, and then before you know it …

Bob Reitz
During that deployment was a difficult time, it was a frustrating time because we were a very good and solid platoon of Seals ready to go do our job. You’re a fireman, you want to go put out the fire. What ended up happening was decided at a much higher level than us, that due to relationships with the locals, they decided to keep us there and … That particular year was an interesting year. I don’t know if you remember but they put … It was that year that Yasser Arafat was jammed up in his house by the Israelis in his palace and that turned the Muslim world completely upside down. Everything that was supposed to happen for us did not happen because our partners could not be trusted.

Bob Reitz
We didn’t know if we flew across the pond over to the next country to get the bad guy, whether or not we would be shot at the border. Much of that got shut down, which created a lot of frustration so we just kept working, shooting, moving, communicating, waiting for something to happen. It grinds on you. It grinds on the guys. It grinds on … They want to go do their job, you want to go do your job, and it can’t happen. Then there’s guys in country that you want to go get and you can’t because they don’t want to create any unnecessary blips on the radar at the moment. That’s kind of how that deployment went.

Bob Reitz
Afghanistan is a completely different story. Afghanistan was kind of a turn and burn. I was [inaudible 004143] operations position so I was doing a lot of integrating and deconfliction to make sure everybody was safe. It was a different level of deployment. Lots of bad guys were gotten. There’s a lot of pressure on you because people are counting on you to do your job and to prevent things, good guys shooting good guys, and it takes a lot of communication, a lot of vigilance to make sure that that doesn’t happen. Kind of the gist of it.

David Poole
We wanted to do this yesterday but we’ve got our own control issues and we do this every Thursday night but can you talk a little bit about what Veteran’s Day means to you personally?

Bob Reitz
I think Veteran’s Day, I would argue to most guys that were in the military, we think about the guys we’ve lost. Memorial Day is that day but Veteran’s Day is lots of people telling you thank you, thank you for your service. We appreciate that very much.

Bob Reitz
At the end of the day, I think I would argue that most every person in the military loves their job. We love what we do. We feel it’s patriotic, it feels good, it’s hard, it’s a good hard job that you feel like you’re making a difference.

Bob Reitz
Veteran’s Day, to me, is more so remembering my friends, the guys that have given the ultimate sacrifice. I think for most guys in the military, Veteran’s Day and Memorial Day are the same thing. You remember the guys you lost, you remember your best friends, you remember them visiting you in hospital and now they’re dead. That’s the reality of it.

Bob Reitz
We love what we do. We love this job. We love … I miss it. I know you know that. I miss working, I miss being in Seal teams. You make your decisions … I got out because of my family, my little boy and my little girl that was just born. Now she’s eight. Good decision. It was the right decision. That doesn’t mean that you don’t miss every day being with the boys and being in that situation. You wish that you could have it both ways but you can’t. You’re going to miss that family time.

Bob Reitz
Veteran’s Day makes you remember. It makes you think about guys that are across the world and doing the job and that have the watch because you don’t have it anymore. That’s Veteran’s Day.

David Poole
Appreciate that. It’s an important day. Bob, we’ll shift after this but when you think about, say, Austin joined the service and maybe he sees combat and maybe he doesn’t, how would you counsel him and advise him on coming back into civilian life? This could be true for any moms and dads on the phone tonight or spouses. It’d be nice to have a roadmap to say, “Hey, here’s what you’re going to find, here’s what you’re going to see, here’s where you’re going to struggle and here’s where you need to ask for help.”

Bob Reitz
Good question. Everybody’s experience is different. I think I’ve told you a little bit about … I have good friends here in Colorado Springs. There’s a Special Forces group right around the corner from me, about three, four miles away. One of my best friends here is a warrant officer in the Special Forces and I’ve got another major who was in the Special Forces and then the warrant officer is still in.

Bob Reitz
He’s a NuCalm user as well. You know him. You know who this person is. Everybody’s experience is different. For a Special Forces soldier who has seen a lot of damage and action and things like that, they come back and they can’t find normalcy. They can’t find … They don’t feel right. For this guy, for instance, he’s dealing with these emotions that he’s lived and he turns to alcohol because alcohol takes the edge off of the stress and the experience. All he wants to do is get back in country and put on body armor and have a gun and feel normal. That’s normal for him.

Bob Reitz
Really, I think for us … I talk to a lot of guys, some of my really close friends, that I served with, and we all have issues sleeping, we all have issues … Not all of us but most of us have issues with sleeping, some with anger, some with anxiety, and it’s important to recognize it.

Bob Reitz
My view of PTSD while I was in the Seal Teams, completely different from what it is today. My neuroses has to do with control and controlling my surroundings, controlling everything around me because when I feel like things are getting a little bit out of control, I want to put everything into place, feel safe, feel normal and then go back to what I was doing.

Bob Reitz
You have to recognize those things in you, whatever they are. If you’re abusing alcohol, if you’re drinking alcohol, you got to recognize that, that you’re trying to numb that feeling. If you are yelling at your wife because she’s not doing the dishes then that’s a problem too. It’s just a matter of recognizing why you’re doing what you’re doing and understanding that it’s normal. For us, it’s normal. For a lot of guys that I’ve talked to, they’re having a hard time sleeping.

Bob Reitz
I think I told you the other day that I was in the grocery store and two shady dudes walked by and it literally stood my hair on end and I left because I didn’t have a gun, I didn’t feel safe, I just wanted to get out of there. Going to the store on another occasion, a big tanker truck rode by me and I wanted to … I couldn’t, obviously, go through the red light but it wasn’t lost on me that a tanker truck could blow up at any moment. It’s getting those moments of what you’re used to overseas to not equal the same thing here at home because they don’t.

Bob Reitz
A lot of guys that come home from patrolling every day around people that they don’t know whether they’re good or bad is hard to turn that off. It’s important … I think as family members, which I know that I told my wife, I said, “I don’t have PTSD. I’m good to go” and so she took me for my word. The first interview I had with a VA counselor talking about PTSD who asked me how my deployments went, I said, “Not that bad.”

Bob Reitz
Not that bad is very relative depending on who you’re talking to and who did the deployment and where you went and what you did in the military. Not that bad to me might be terrifying to somebody else. But it wasn’t that bad because in my view, everybody came home, they had fingers and toes, they had eyes, they had ears, nobody got blown up and the plane didn’t crash so we were good. That was a good deployment. Everybody came home. It’s like a good landing. Any landing is a good landing.

Bob Reitz
But those things don’t equal the same thing. What I would argue and what I would tell you is that if dysfunction shows its head there may be an issue and it will be worth looking at because it’s going to be different for everybody. A lot of folks turn to alcohol and/or some type of let’s call it a thing that can help them deal with the intensity of what they’re feeling. They want to numb it and they want to turn off that feeling.

Bob Reitz
What I would say is be aware and be vigilant of that. If you’re a caregiver, if you’re a parent, if you’re a wife, recognize it and have sympathy and empathy for it and understand that it’s not something that the person may not even realize why they’re doing it. They’re just doing it because they need to.

David Poole
Bob, if I may ask a personal question, now that you know and understand and respect the diagnosis, what do you think about? What are the coping things you’ve developed to understand, “Hey, I need to snap out of this”? Do you go for a walk? Do you breathing exercises? Do you take a cold shower? Do you do the dishes?

Bob Reitz
Deep breaths.

David Poole
[crosstalk 005054] paper plates and plastic forks.

Bob Reitz
Are you asking me how I don’t kill my 14 year old. Deep breaths. I think, obviously, I work for NuCalm. I was blessed by Dr. Walters, David Walters, one of our guys. We talked about this a little bit. Dave recognized in me … He recognized that I was dying on the vine and Dave came to you long before me. He’s been my doctor since just before retiring out of the Navy. I’m a NuCalm believer. Dave introduced me to NuCalm, introduced me to you.

Bob Reitz
He’s a mentor of mine. He’s a good friend of mine. I care about him very much. He, as you know, gifted me a system about two years ago. I started NuCalm and, as we talked about today, I wasn’t quite sure of the technology, the whole deal had to do more with I was traveling 100,000 miles a year doing this other job.

Bob Reitz
At the end of the day, he ended up calling me down and telling me, “Hey, I need you to do something for me. I need you to tell me how this works for you. Could you please just let me know how it helps you with dealing with the timezones and traveling and all that business?” It changed my life.

Bob Reitz
It’s been a long drive. It’s been a long journey for me figuring out, again, that I have PTSD. I only got diagnosed this year. I thought I was fine. But coping, obviously, exercise and I sit down a lot when I’m angry and when I’m upset. I sit down because I get out of that mode of where I could go and especially with my son. He pushes my every button, as he should. He’s 14. He’s going on 15. For him, he’s going to push every boundary known to man and let me know that it’s okay.

Bob Reitz
For fear of treating him like a team guy, treating him like he’s a Seal, I need to make sure I don’t do that. Often times now, I just sit down. I say, “Son, let’s sit down and talk.” It takes the edge off. Take a deep breath. I’ve been NuCalming quite a bit.

Bob Reitz
The other thing that I did that helped, Dave, is I changed my job. It sounds gratuitous and kind of funny. I was miserable with my last job, which is why I called you. I didn’t call to work for you in a sense. At first, I called you to have you send me systems so that I could send them to people I really cared about.

Bob Reitz
One of those jerks is on the line here. He texted me just before to give me shit, to let me know that he was on, [Casey Tarabolini 005403]. I’m going to say your name. Anyway, he’s a very dear friend of mine and I wanted him to use it, specifically.

Bob Reitz
That’s why I called you. It blossomed into something that was much better and more important, which is bringing me to where I am today. It was, obviously, Dr. Walters who said, “Here, you should try this” and I did and I remember driving home that day not giving a shit about anything. I didn’t care if people passed me, I didn’t care if people cut me off. I just was in this really calm, quiet space and then became a believer.

Bob Reitz
A few things changed in my life. I changed my job. I do more NuCalm. I take deep breaths. I try to sit down before I get angry. That usually helps the situation.

David Poole
When we’re arguing and you sit down, I need to leave the room really quickly.

Bob Reitz
Yes. Definitely.

David Poole
Understood. All right, my friend. Hey, that was amazing. Really appreciate you sharing your insights, your personal stories, and I’d like to open up for questions. Erica will moderate. I know Cheryl had a question. You can go off mute, Cheryl.

Cheryl
I did. Actually, he answered it in his own way. Thank you very much, Bob, for this special time and your service. It’s heartfelt and personally and professionally. [inaudible 005544] therapist and I work, as we say, the issues are in the tissues and have done some intensives with veterans using cranial psychotherapy. I haven’t had the fortunate use … I’ve incorporated NuCalm in my practice. The question that I had, because I put both of them together, and that’s pretty profound as well. David can probably speak on that.

Cheryl
My question is how do you share this with your fellow men?

Bob Reitz
I’ll tell you. One person at a time. I have a very … Part of the isolation here in Colorado Springs, there’s no ocean, there are no Seals. There are now. We’ve got more Seals in town. A dear friend of mine … It’s interesting. I was literally going to my VA appeal appointment to reassess whether I did or did not have PTSD. I called my friend who was a master chief, which is the really senior enlisted Seal who has done about a bazillion more deployments than I have, dealt with more stuff. Our enlisted guys really do carry the weight.

Bob Reitz
I called him to just check. I had a question for another friend I was working with. I said, “Hey, how are you doing?” He’s like, “Well, I’m living in the basement. My wife’s about done with me. I can’t handle the noise. I can’t handle the extra noise. It’s too intense.” I told him, I said, “Okay, I’m going to my appointment. I’ll be at your house and I’m going to have you try something.”

Bob Reitz
I put him on NuCalm, which is really cool. I watched him … I sat down in the basement with him and I could feel the tension in their house. It’s incredible. We decided as a team, we weren’t going to say a word about another modality that they were going to try that was going to all of a sudden fix his PTSD and his issues because he had tried every one.

Bob Reitz
For him, he wouldn’t even do longer than 20 minutes. He felt like he was doing something wrong. I put him on for the 20 minute power nap and I watched him settle into the couch and calm down. It was interesting because from that moment forward, we went outside and his spouse, his wife had left. There was another Seal in the house so there was something, obviously, bad happening.

Bob Reitz
We went outside and the neighbor was shoveling rocks. Just an awesome sound of someone diving in with a metal shovel into rocks. He looked at me and he said, “It’s interesting. I don’t understand what’s happening right now but normally that would make me want to either go across the street and do something bad or go inside and just get away from it.” He said, “It’s really not that bad.”

Bob Reitz
I had him describe it and he said, “It’s just not as intense.” That’s what we talk about with him is the level of intensity that he feels that things that normally irritate him and cause him to explode and make his family want to run away.

Bob Reitz
It’s funny. You just reach out to different guys or they find you and you introduce them, gently, to the product. You say, “Hey, listen. This is an option. Give it a go.” For him, in particular, he’s been NuCalming every day since and things are getting very good for him, they’re getting much better. He doesn’t understand the science. We’ve tried to explain it to him. It doesn’t really matter for him. He’s just happy that it’s working.

Bob Reitz
It’s through conversation. I had a conversation with another customer today. I think I mentioned him earlier. He’s the one that has a long history of family in the military. All he wants to do is take care of vets. We talked about it today and I said, “Hey, listen, what I need from you is I need their name, I need their service, when they were in, what they did” and so we have a simple vetting process and I’m fighting hard to work with 501s and get those systems funded so those vets get those systems.

Bob Reitz
He talked about a friend of his who was in dire straits. I said, “Get his information and send it to me and we’ll get him sorted out. We’ll get him on. No matter what, we’ll get him on and then we’ll sort out the rest later.” That’s how we do it.

Bob Reitz
I work with Dave and Dave’s very supportive. I come to him with people and I say, “I have a hard case and I need help.” He says, “No problem. Let’s get them going and then we’ll sort out the rest later.” That’s how we take care of them. The more word we get out, the better.

David Poole
I say yes to everything, Bob, because I’m scared to death of you.

Bob Reitz
I’m going to come visit you.

David Poole
Don’t.

Erica
Thank you very much, Bob. I just wanted to say thanks for sharing your story. It’s something I’ve never heard. I’ve worked with you a lot over the last year but usually it’s always work stuff and we don’t really dive into the personal too much. Thank you very much on behalf of everyone for joining us tonight.

Erica
To follow-up on the last question you had, there was a question from Bridget and I’ll read it out loud but it goes along about how do you customize NuCalm for these vets that you’re working with. She says, “I have a few friends who are former Seals and they are notorious for not only being extremely picky about the products and tools they surround themselves with because they have to rely on them in life and death situations but they also find ways to customize or improve on these products to fit their needs. I am curious to know if you have come up with ways to customize NuCalm to reach maximum performance?”

Bob Reitz
Yeah. That’s a good question. Dave and I talk a lot about this as we try to get this out to our boys. It’s one thing … We’re talking veterans, we’re talking folks that come home from the military and try to assimilate back into society, their families, and to their normal life, which is difficult as it is.

Bob Reitz
For our guys … Take, for instance, being in Afghanistan. We don’t work normal hours, obviously. We go visit people in the middle of the night. We wake them up. That’s the idea. We go on a completely different schedule. We go on a night time schedule. We wake up, eat breakfast at five o’clock in the evening and we eat dinner after we’re all done for breakfast. That really throws you off, working … Anybody who works nights understands that.

Bob Reitz
What I would argue is for the guys that are going overseas, that are deploying, the Seals that are actually doing work today, I wish I had NuCalm when I was working those types of hours, when I was working the moonlight … We’re usually off during the moon time, we’re usually on when it’s dark and so it would be really nice … You go 14, 15 straight days of missions and working at night.

Bob Reitz
To have NuCalm at the side and to have this product that not only restores you but it creates … You become more awake. Anybody who’s done NuCalm understands you’re more alert, you feel better, you get restored. For those guys, I would argue, when you come home at night to unwind, if you had a really rough night, you can wind down with NuCalm. It’ll take all that adrenaline and it’ll shut it down. Then when you wake up in the morning, you do a quick session, and get focused for the day because you’re trying to wake up as the night begins.

Bob Reitz
It helps you with those rhythms that you’re actually doing the exact opposite of what you’re designed to do. I think that’s where NuCalm really shines. They have to try it. They have to do it. They’ve got to see it to believe it. That’s the idea.

Erica
Yeah. I guess I can ask this to David and Bob but if there are people on this call who do have friends who are vets or they themselves, they can always reach out? Is that okay to say?

Bob Reitz
Of course.

Erica
That helps Bridget.

Bob Reitz
Without question. Sometimes vets don’t want to hear it from anybody. They don’t want to hear it from people that they look at and say, “You don’t get it.” But sometimes they will talk to somebody who has been there and does get it. I don’t care if it’s three in the morning on Sunday night, if somebody needs to call me because they’re hurting, they can. I’ve always said that and I mean it.

Bob Reitz
Especially if it’s somebody who’s hurting and in a dysfunctional place, and I am sure … I know Dave would do the same thing. Any of us would. We’re always available, especially if people are hurting.

Erica
Thank you so much, Bob. I see Sarah has a question that she posted in the chat. Sarah, you can just come off mute and ask Bob your question.

Sarah
Can you hear me?

Bob Reitz
Yes.

Sarah
Okay. Hi, Bob. I’m sorry. I jumped in late. I had another Zoom right before this. I have a TBI from when I was in the Air Force. It is affected a lot … It affects my sleep and things. I’m not combat but I had some other instances happen in the military. I also have TMJ really bad and my doctors and everything think they’re connected. I don’t sleep and I grind like heck. I’m having all sorts of dental problems now because of this.

Sarah
I was wondering if NuCalm works like that because I am trying to get one but I’m trying to go through … The VA needs to research if they’re going to get it. It’s just right now I’m not at a place where I can get one. I know there’s people that are way more [inaudible 010628] than I am and I want them … If they benefit more, then I want them to get it but if there’s a way I can help somebody else too, I want to do that.

Bob Reitz
Let’s start at ground zero first, right? Anybody will tell you, just in any family situation, you will help a lot more people, the sooner you get to a place where you have the bandwidth to help other people. That’s where we’re going to get you first is you’re going to get your bandwidth up to a point and get you to a place where you feel normal again.

Bob Reitz
I grind my teeth. They’re shredded, my teeth. It’s one of my biggest issues. It’s difficult to manage. There’s a lot to it but at the end of the day, you need a mouth guard that helps you from shredding your teeth to pieces. That’s where my stress goes too. It goes to the same place. I grind my teeth every single day and I have to stop myself.

Bob Reitz
TBI-wise, I’m going to leave that to Dave because he has way more experience with that than I do. All I can tell you is is that I’m diagnosed … We have it … Obviously, we have lots of breaching issues that we deal with on Seal Teams. We shoot rockets that are very big and very loud and very concussive. We shoot a lot of them all the time in the Teams. Often times, we shoot them for fun just to get rid of the ordinance because we have to.

Bob Reitz
The TBI is a significant issue. As you know, the VA looks at TBI not as TBI but it looks at your symptoms of TBI. The VA will not at this point … As you said, they’re going to do some research and that’s going to be slow. That’s not the right path that we want to go with you. What we want to do is connect with me and then we can talk about and we’ll sort out how to get you going to try it and see if you find some relief. That’s really at the end of the day how we would do it. That’s how I do it with everybody.

Bob Reitz
If it’s expensive then at this very moment I am working with … I’m figuring out my path and how to work with the 501s and all of the charities, lack of better term. There’s lot of different 501 charities that are out there that are helping veterans. There’s a ton. We are sorting that out as we speak.

Bob Reitz
You’re not alone. They key is don’t sit back and wait. Reach out. I don’t know. I think Erica … I don’t know if my information is there or Dave’s information. Connect with Erica, Erica will connect you, someone in NuCalm will connect you and get you going. That’s the key. Give it a go. I’m confident it will help you but let’s give it a go.

David Poole
[crosstalk 010938].

Sarah
Sorry. Go ahead.

David Poole
It’s a Christmas miracle that you joined the call because I’m looking at Cheryl Larson, who can treat TBI, I’m looking at Erica Robinson, whose dad is a dentist and treats TMJ, no shit, and Che, who builds planes so he can relate to your Air Force experience. Please, reach out to us and we’ll take care of you. I promise.

Sarah
Thank you. If I can help, I’ve got a background in social work and mental health and I’ve done a lot with grant writing. I’ve gotten a few grants approved at the farm I volunteer at. If I can help with grant writing, I’ll happily put my pen to paper.

David Poole
No worries. Like Bob said, we’ll get you in a place where you’ve got bandwidth and then we’ll put you to work for the rest of your life. [crosstalk 011034].

Bob Reitz
That’s how Dave does it.

Sarah
I’m all about giving back. My goal is to open a farm that helps veterans with using rescued horses. That’s why I want to get myself a better bandwidth too.

David Poole
Excellent.

Sarah
Thank you.

Bob Reitz
You bet.

Erica
Thank you, Sarah. Brendan, I see that you’ve also asked to speak so please come off mute and fire away.

Brendan
Thanks, guys. Yeah. I was just wondering. This is not really so much NuCalm-specific but I was wondering, Bob, if there was anything you recommend, like I’m an athlete, for you guys, obviously, getting in the zone and staying in that in combat … Like, for us, if we have a bad play or miss a pass or something like that, we get another chance at it. Obviously, for you guys, it could be way worse consequences. I wondered if there was something that you do, whether it was breath work or something like that that could keep you in that mindset when you were in combat?

Bob Reitz
I’d argue don’t fall in love with a mistake. At the end of the day, we’re not finished until we’re finished. Everybody makes mistakes. We always say to … One of our sayings is that the mission planning is simply point of departure. Nothing in a mission plan goes as ordered. Nothing in a mission plan goes as you would want it to. It literally is a point of departure and so it’s the … What sport do you do?

Brendan
Hockey.

Bob Reitz
Okay. You guys practice incessantly. Dave is a huge hockey player. You’re speaking his language. What I would tell you is is that for us, even if … We always say in the Seal Teams, a bad plan followed and done well is better than a good plan that doesn’t get followed and done well. You know what I’m saying?

Bob Reitz
The point being is if you make a mistake and we all adjust to it, we’re going to adjust to it quickly and we’re going to as a group, adjust to that problem and literally flow through it. Nothing in warfare is planned. It can’t be because you’re dealing with at least one other person that gets a vote. It’s usually more people than that that get a vote and can change the flow of what you thought was going to happen.

Bob Reitz
We don’t get married to any plan per se. We have a direction. We know what we need to do as an end result. We’re not married by any stretch of the imagination to following that to the T. What you might consider a mistake is just a flow problem and the guys accept it, they flow right through it, and they move past it and go on with the objective, with the final objective at hand, which is to win. That’s all we care about is winning. That they pay, not us.

Bob Reitz
In sports, the same rules. You have a problem. If you make a mistake, if you lose the puck, if somebody scores on you, then you adjust, you all get together, and you move through it and you pass it. You get to a point to where you’re succeeding again.

Brendan
Awesome. Thank you.

David Poole
Brendan, we don’t have a lot of time tonight but Bob and I speak all the time and what he’s not telling you is the Bud’s training, the training he does and the deployments he does, he’s been conditioned to live well outside of his comfort zone. He said today, “Hey, Dave, when they said I was going to be running for 20 hours” I was like, “Uh, no. I’m not. Never done that. Maybe you could run a marathon for four hours. I’m not running for 20 hours.” Sure as shit, I ran for 20 hours and so did everybody else who never thought they could.

David Poole
His point, when we talk about this and the conditioning and training, like you said, “Hey, if I can hold my breath for three minutes, they care what I do at 301 and 330 and four minutes.” For you, you’ve got natural talent … We work with a lot of hockey players and it’s not because I love the sport. It’s because they were smart enough to take on NuCalm seven, eight years ago.

David Poole
Trust your instincts, trust your mechanics but you need to have that mindset of quickly forget the mistakes and don’t let that [inaudible 011537] itty bitty shitty committee get inside your head and ratchet it up and go back … That’s what happens in baseball too. I work with a lot of athletes and a lot of baseball players. They’ll go through a rough time at the plate and they’ll call me. I’m like, “Why are you calling me, dude? I’m not your sports psychologist. I’m not your hitting coach.” He’s like, “Yeah, but you’re not judging me.” I’m like, “I’m not judging. What I do know is that you were born to hit baseballs. Better than anybody else on the planet. Shut up, stop complaining, get out there and hit baseballs. It’s that simple.”

David Poole
Same thing for you. Get in there and do the exact same thing you’ve been trained to do and don’t let it get personal and don’t take the blame for something … That doesn’t mean don’t take responsibility. Don’t take the blame for stuff and just move forward.

David Poole
Bob does that every day in every situation. I’ve known he’s had PTSD since I met him. He didn’t admit it. He didn’t know it. But he’s got moves. He cycles through them. We know as a team and as a family that supports Bob and loves him to death, and he can’t do any wrong to us, we just listen. I don’t fight with Bob. He’s in a mood, I listen and say, “Okay, I get it.” Then lo and behold, I don’t know if he sits down and gets better but now I know the trick.

David Poole
Same thing for you. We can take this offline too, bro. I’m happy to connect you with some of the pro players we work with if you want to talk to your peers.

Bob Reitz
Yeah. Brendan, don’t be afraid of failure, right? At the end of the day. One thing that we learned and Dave reminded me, it’s funny because it’s not something that … It isn’t a joke. If you run a four minute mile, nobody cares. The instructors will look at you and say, “Hey, that was great. You better beat it tomorrow.” Right?

Bob Reitz
If you can hold your breath … Some of our guys can really hold their breath long. They don’t care. They’ll wait on the surface for three minutes and then go down. They don’t care if you can do 500 pushups. They want to see what you can do at 501 and 502 and what your attitude is there. That’s why a lot of the big strong guys quit is because they’ve never seen … Because they could always do those pushups and always hold their breath longest, they’ve never been exposed to failure.

Bob Reitz
One thing that our training really introduces you to on a daily basis is not good enough, you’re always failing, you’re never good enough. That’s the strength of our unit is we’re used to failing for each other and as a group and rebounding from that. That’s the key is to rebound and to move forward even though you just got your shit handed to you by an instructor who is not impressed that you ran a 330 mile. He wants to see what you do the next day and the next day and the next day after that.

Bob Reitz
I would tell you so what? Who cares if you made a mistake? Circle back, find it, fix it, forget it, and don’t make a mistake again.

Brendan
Awesome. Thanks, guys. Appreciate that.

Erica
Well, from what I can see in our [crosstalk 011913].

David Poole
Erica, do you have Ken Miller? Speak to Sarah’s … He had a good comment about her grinding. This could help out too.

Erica
Ken says, “People who grind their teeth a lot at night should be tested for obstructive sleep apnea because [inaudible 011928] can be a sign of not getting enough air at night. I may be way off here but it’s something that should be considered.” I would probably, as the daughter of a dentist who does this, I would also second what Ken has just said.

Bob Reitz
[crosstalk 011945].

David Poole
He knows. Yes.

Bob Reitz
I have central sleep apnea.

Erica
Yeah. Sleep apnea is very common. For those in the Mastermind program, you can definitely go back and watch that recording with Dr. Robinson where he does talk about breathing and sleep and stress and your jaw and your bite and how it’s all interconnected.

Erica
I don’t see any other questions here but I just wanted to echo some of the comments that were said on behalf of some of the participants, Bob, from Casey saying, “Bobby, so glad that you found NuCalm, brother. Thanks for your service and thank you for being you, pal.”

Bob Reitz
That’s my guy.

Erica
[crosstalk 012029], which I might butcher, uva uvam vivendo varia fit, which maybe you know it more than I do. I don’t speak [inaudible 012038].

Bob Reitz
Latin.

Erica
Mark, who had to drop off but he says, “Bob, thank you for being on this call today and sharing your story. I resonate with you on several issues, being a retired combat arms Marine. I have to leave the call for another one soon but thanks again and Semper fidelis, brother.”

Bob Reitz
Semper fi. That’s Marine brothers.

Erica
Che says, “Bob, do you always speak this calmly? Especially after you just discharged from [inaudible 012108] is the effect of NuCalm on you.”

Bob Reitz
No. I had a whole glass of vodka. It’s water. Che, you know I’m here for you, buddy. All hours of the night, my Singaporean brother.

Erica
All right. David, do you want to say any final words?

David Poole
Oh, great. Yeah. Let’s wrap it up. Thanks, Bob. Appreciate it. You know how much we love you and appreciate your service. I’m really glad you were willing to share.

 

Can NuCalm Help With PTSD?

Retired Navy SEAL Bob Reitz joins This Is NuCalm to share how his deployments have shaped civilian life. He elaborates on the coping mechanisms he’s developed in conjunction with NuCalm, to manage his PTSD and hypervigilance.

 

“You may be able to hold your breath for five minutes, but they want to know how you manage and how you act at five minutes and one second. Do you panic? Do you compete? Do you keep your composure? Do you stay underwater and relax even though you’re a quiet storm inside? All those things matter.”

— Bob Reitz

 

Bob Reitz is open and honest in this conversation with David Poole about what it entails to be a SEAL. He shares some of the grueling trials and training required.

 

“Everything about SEAL training is failure.”

— Bob Reitz

 

Tune into this bittersweet and motivational discussion with former Navy SEAL, Bob Reitz on This Is NuCalm! 

 

More About Bob Reitz, Retired U.S. Navy SEAL

Bob joined the Navy in 1988 and served both as an Enlisted Sailor and a Commissioned Officer over his 22 year career.  The first 8 years in the Navy Bob served as a Machinist Mate where he repaired Submarines in Italy and followed by his time in at the University of Arizona where he received his Bachelor’s Degree and Commission; the last 16 years he served as a Commissioned Officer in the US Navy SEAL Teams. Bob was assigned to SEAL Team ONE, SEAL Team FIVE, Special Boat Team TWELVE and also the Naval Postgraduate School where he received his Master’s Degree.  Over his time in the Navy he deployed 6 times for 6-7 months each deployment and served 4 years abroad when he was stationed in Italy and Guam.

After leaving the Navy Bob worked as a Security Contractor with other SEALS protecting the Middle East Maersk Shipping line from Pirating and Kidnapping operations conducted by local criminal elements. He later went into the Defense Contracting Industry where he sold Covert Audio and Video equipment to both DOD and Federal Agencies.  It was during this time that he was introduced to NuCalm by way of a Gifted NuCalm System from Dr. David Walters (Bob’s personal Doctor) to help him with Sleep and Travel.  Because NuCalm had such a profound effect on Bob, he quit his Defense Contracting career and reached out to NuCalm to join the team!