Dr. Blake Holloway — Inventor of NuCalm — On How and Why it Works

Get ready to have any and all questions answered about the power behind NuCalm!

Inventor of NuCalm, Dr. G. Blake Holloway joins David Poole in this episode of This Is NuCalm. Whether it’s our stress response being equivalent to a fire station or our GABA working like an engine coolant in an automobile, in this episode, Dr. Holloway is straightforward when explaining the organic effects of NuCalm.

 

“GABA is like the engine coolant for your automobile, it keeps the whole system from overheating and the other transmitter sites from going into hyper-arousal.”

— Dr. G. Blake Holloway

 

No matter what you’re looking to improve – stress levels or sleep quality – Dr. G. Blake Holloway is transparent about the best way to utilize NuCalm. Whatever questions you have about the benefits of NuCalm, you’ll get your answers during this episode!

 

Listen to This Is NuCalm on Apple & Spotify!

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway was chief science officer and founder of Solace Lifesciences and inventor of NuCalm. He spent 30 years as a researcher in applied and neuro-psychobiology. From his private clinical naturopathy practices, Holloway helped people nationwide with anxiety, trauma, depression, pain, addiction, and circadian disorders.

 



Key Takeaways

[1:00] David welcomes Dr. Blake Holloway — inventor of NuCalm — and asks him to walk us through who he is and how pathological curiosity led him to where he is today.

 

[8:00] Dr. Holloway shares how AMAs were the original inspiration for the NuCalm device. He also touches on the desperately high relapse rate among alcoholics and drug addicts.

 

[11:00] On the cranial electrotherapy stimulation device that led Dr. Holloway down the GABA path and private clinical research.

 

[14:12] Correlating high anxiety with endogenic levels of certain neurotransmitters was a huge step towards the NuCalm system. Dr. Holloway talks about the three methods he used to evoke brain potential.

 

[21:23] The newest version of NuCalm is what Dr. Holloway calls a quantum jump from what it used to be.

 

[23:50] Dr. Holloways explains what the stress response is at the neurological level as well as how NuCalm helps regulate it.

 

[27:00] Your stress response triggers your immune response. Dr. Blake Holloway explains why this is a problem — and how it relates to COVID-19 deaths.

 

[32:02] Listener question #1: What’s the best way to use NuCalm?

 

[35:24] #2 Why do some people get restless leg syndrome during a session?

 

[38:57] #3 Are there benefits to taking amino acids during a session?

 

[40:12] #4 Are there people for whom NuCalm is not effective?

 

[42:58] #5 What about doing NuCalm in the evenings?

 

[47:56] #6 Is there any research on NuCalm and BiPolar disorder?

 

[50:12] #7 Can you focus on the breath while doing NuCalm?

 

[51:45] David thanks Dr. Blake Holloway for all of his contributions as well as his generosity.

 

Continue on your journey and until next time, breathe deep, relax, and keep looking forward.

 

This is NuCalm, the show for those looking to improve sleep quality, manage stress, and boost recovery. Brought to you by Solace Lifesciences, the makers of NuCalm, the world’s only patented and proven neuroscience technology that works within minutes, without drugs, every time! In over one million medical sessions, NuCalm has helped men and women around the world.

 

NuCalm: stress relief for the way we live today, technology to help you disconnect.


Full Transcript

 

David Poole

Introducing Doctor Blake Holloway, the inventor of NuCalm, and we’re going to have a casual conversation tonight. First I would like to start with Doctor Holloway, could you please tell the group a little bit about your background and what inspired you to take on the life you’ve taken on, honestly.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

A little part of my history. I was born with Asperger’s and didn’t really speak until I was four years old. My mother came in my room one day and under my bed we had an extensive library in a multi-generational family home, that probably had 3000 to 4000 books in it. So she looks under my bed and finds all these encyclopedias and reference books, and she asked me, “What are you doing with all those books under your bed?” I said, “I’m reading them,” and my mother passed out. But we had a discussion later, why I wasn’t speaking. I don’t exactly know other than the fact that I taught… after I taught myself to read, I guess I thought I could speak. So those were some formative events that I think shaped me.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

And the other is just something that I was born with, which is… I don’t have any other term for it, other than an absolute pathological curiosity. I was the child you never wanted to leave at home alone because your radios and other appliances might not have been reassembled quite as well as I disassembled them initially. So if I was ever left at home I had to swear a promise that I would not disassemble electronics and reassemble into something that I thought was better. So I think those are a bit of the sort of formative things in my life that led to that. I still have a pathological curiosity, and I have a real annoyance with academic institutions that very much become, in the publisher parish, world or otherwise, becomes like petty, dysfunctional families that have fought inter-generationally.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

I don’t do well in those environments, and if you look at the way various disciplines work in academic environments, there’s a lot of siloing. People are kind of up in their own individual tower, and what I’ve always been driven to do is to look outside of the boxes of my particular disciplines, that there are things to learn from other disciplines also. So I think because of this really intense drive of curiosity I have, I’m oftentimes parsing the research and going through the research of a lot of other disciplines, and when you do that, you start to see how systems and disciplines have very similar operations to them.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

When you start thinking operationally and particularly when you start thinking in terms of quantum mechanics or something, you start to see that there’s more universality among various disciplines than there is a lack of them. So that has been a driving principle for my life. The initial inspirations for NuCalm come out of my background of applied psychobiology and certainly my background of neuroscience, and then also my background in functional medicine. And when you merge those together and start looking through one lens into a content package of another discipline, you really start to view things in a bit of a different way.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So you go, if this principle works in this particular discipline, what happens if we applied that same principle to another discipline, and then all of a sudden you have novel correspondences or you’ve really discovered a principle that in itself, while it’s not innate, it’s there in that particular discipline. I think those particular imprints on me, the historical imprints, some of the genetic imprints and otherwise, are an awful lot of what directs my life, yet today and particularly the way that I approach the field of research.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

One thing we don’t often crow about as a company, but we’re the first company that did translational neuroscience. Translational neuroscience… if you know about translational medicine, all the research in the world is just fine, but if you cannot conduct that research into something that benefits a patient at bedside or chairside, you really don’t have a lot that’s useful. Now, the human genome project took several decades, and now out of all that research, we didn’t really understand it when we first captured all of the genome and otherwise. Now that we understand why, we’re able to take that body of knowledge and we’re able to create molecular medicine that changes some of the misspelled genetic code.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So that’s an illustration of a very powerful application of when the research started… they didn’t even have… the tools were not present to be able to complete a research project that large. So I think that is maybe enough of a orientation of where I’m coming from. Dave, do you want to conduct some questions to me?

 

David Poole

Yes, sure. Yeah, please, Dr Holloway. What was the problem statement? What was the challenge you faced in your clinical practice that inspired you to even think of a solution or try and develop a solution like NuCalm?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Well, I was working in the addictive disease field. I was the executive director of one of the most elite alcohol and drug treatment centers in the country. And one of the real problems, if you’re around the treatment community for very long, are AMAs. Those are people that check themselves into treatment and then they leave four or five days later. AMA means they’re leaving the treatment center against medical advice. However, unless a person is adjudicated incompetent, you can’t keep them there, even if it’s in their interest to be there. One of the dirty little secrets about alcohol and drug abuse treatment is that there is still a profoundly high relapse rate, and one of the problems with this high relapse rate is that there are high numbers… I don’t think this should come as a surprise to anyone. That there are high numbers of drug addicts and alcoholics who have comorbid anxiety disorders.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Now when those people present to treatment, and they begin to detox off whatever their beverage or drugs of choice were, they start to get extremely increased anxiety signaling. And these people are poorly parsed out in intake process. Almost everyone in a treatment center will sit with the psychologist in the intake process, and a primary addiction therapist in the intake process, and once these particular patients start to detox, they’ll come up to nursing and want medication. They will be accused of being drug seeking, and anxiety is the number one trigger for relapse in addictive diseases. You don’t ever see a relapse unless there is a lot of anxiety promoting circumstances and anxiety in the treatment individuals themselves.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

There was a woman in England who was treating a lot of the metal bands successfully for addiction, and she was using a form of cranial electrotherapy stimulation, which is a mild brain stimulation out of a little black box, about the size of a pack of cigarettes. I was familiar with this technology as I spent considerable time at the Pablo Institute in Leningrad, which has changed back to its original name. But I saw that technology. It was invented by Russians. And I took an interest in that technology and started experimenting around it with some private addiction patients that I had. I got some fairly nice results in the experimentation, but not anything that you would want to say, “Here’s the silver bullet for it.”

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

I worked another three years looking at combinations and otherwise, and since I’m particularly interested in the neurotransmitter system within the brain, we knew that one of the principles that made cranial electrotherapy stimulation worked so well for addiction is because it caused a purging of all your neurotransmitters, and then they come back into the neurotransmitter sites in a better state of balance. But I knew enough about biological chemistry of the brain to know you have to have certain raw materials, and these are certain amino acids that are the precursors to your neurotransmitters. GABA is a precursor transmitter to your GABA neurotransmitter. Tyrosine is a precursor amino acid to your dopamine neurotransmitter, and 5-Hydroxytryptophan is a converted amino acid that’s the precursor to your serotonin neurotransmitter. And then inositol tyrosine to your norepinephrine neurotransmitter.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So your neurotransmitters, and there are a couple of broad categories. Catecholamines that are excitatory, and then monoamine, which are inhibitory. So serotonin is an inhibitory neurotransmitter, dopamine is an excitatory neurotransmitter. When you have addiction problems, you’re producing a hyper amount of dopamine, which is a pleasure reward chemical, and that’s what keeps you in a loop. It’s not the alcohol or the other things that make you high. It’s the hyper release of dopamine from the ventral tegmental area of the brain.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

A lab test came out of Germany that made it possible for the first time to look at the body base level of neurotransmitters through looking at organic cations transmitters. Organic cations are the electrical carts that deliver your neurotransmitters to the transmitter sites that they are involved in. So I had the capacity to measure where people’s neurotransmitters were, and when we would take particularly anxiety patients and I would take addiction patients with high anxiety test metrics and we would… There was a particular state I would look at, where the test came back on a lot of anxiety patients, and there were two very opposite polarity conditions involved.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

One would be we would find in an anxious person, an extremely high level of GABA. Well, if they had high levels of GABA, theoretically they should not be having anxiety. GABA is like the engine coolant for your automobile. It keeps the whole system from overheating, and keeps your other transmitter sites from going into hyper-arousal, which is like what will cause seizure disorders. I’ve started doing some testing, and we would find these really strange opposite conditions. That is to say, you would find highly anxious people with some very high amounts of GABA and/or almost no GABA whatsoever. So I sorted this group of high GABA patients out that were still having lots and lots of anxiety, and I exposed them to particular… I built my own cranial electrotherapy stimulator on my electrics bench, and I exposed the patients that took pre-lab samples and then post-lab samples.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

And low and behold, after exposing the individuals that had high levels of GABA, which means those levels of GABA were outside the receptor sites, they weren’t inside the receptor sites, we would get a record back and you wouldn’t see the GABA there. And then when we gave augmenting amino acids to people that showed no GABA there and we would apply cranial electrotherapy stimulation, we would find that their neurotransmitter levels would go up pretty precipitously. So those were two of the basic investigations that I started of something that became the NuCalm system.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

And out of particular interest in another way to evoke potentials in the brain… the electrotherapy stimulator is one. Amino acids supplementation was another. And a third method that we looked at for evoking potentials, for putting the brain into specific electrical frequency ranges, was binaural sound. And we went through individual testing, looking at that, and then when we combined the binaural sound with amino acid supplementation, with cranial electrotherapy stimulation, we got a quantum effect in the increase of the efficacy. And it was at that point that we could actually see that we were affecting a shift in heart rate variability, placing the autonomic nervous system into parasympathetic dominance, which is the restorative state of the autonomic nervous system, where all sorts of androgen balance and body repair and cellular repair take place in that particular set of evoked potentials.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

And then we got a simple achieving, sort of cheat method that I’d arrived out of my [inaudible 001951] readings of brains, which are called quantitative EEGs. If you block light to the eyes, the suprachiasmatic cells and the hypothalamus send different messaging to the back of the brain. The posterior portion of your brain is part of the portion of the brain that creates the pictures. Your eyes do not create pictures. Your brain creates the pictures, visual pictures, you say you see with your eyes. Your eyes only collect light. When you block light from the eyes with a light-blocking mask, you will automatically in just a couple of minutes put the rear portion of the brain into alpha state dominance. It will immediately go into an alpha state.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So you get a 30% jump in the brain without doing anything, just by blocking the light that comes in through the eyes. And when you combine all four of these basic systems, amino acid augmentation, cranial electrotherapy, stimulation, light blocking mask, neuroacoustic sound files, you have a very stable four-legged bench to rest upon and have your important communication systems in your central nervous system, autonomic nervous system and peripheral nervous systems and otherwise go into homeostasis, which is a preferable balance. And that’s kind of the story of the evolution of NuCalm.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

And the new version of NuCalm has quantum jumped in our technology because we have condensed the footprint size of the system into something that’s much easier to use and produces a more robust effect, and that has been achieved through our bioresonance disc of platform and advances in acoustic evocation of specific frequency brain states, through our neuroacoustic programs. We have specialty intellectual property and patents on… we evoked a new methodology that’s much more sophisticated than binaural sound. We still deliver the sound files in alternating between the left and the right ears. However, the method by which we achieved that is proprietary and based on nonlinear dynamics of quantum mechanics and oscillating the sound files in an oscillatory, vibratory pattern, that the brain will continue to listen to.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

On standard binaural files, the brain usually becomes bored within five or 10 minutes, and won’t keep following the instruction of those sounds to evoke certain potentials. And we overcome that problem, and when you look at our QEEGs, our heart rate variability measures today, we’re able to bring them up into ranges that we had never been able to achieve totally with our previous system. So it also is easier to ship and much easier for the end consumer to apply, much easier to travel with. Dave, any more questions coming up in our pocket? Do I need to detail this out anymore?

 

David Poole

I was just going to suggest, if you could, to make it a little more relatable, could you just talk quickly about the human stress response? What happens neuro chemically and how NuCalm interrupts that in the organic way it does?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Yeah. Well, one thing, remember that I said that one of the big systems that have evidence that we can regulate it is the GABA [inaudible 002507] system. Like I say, a good way to conceive of the GABA system in the brain, and the serotonin system in the brain, is that they’re inhibitory. I often call them the engine coolant. You need an engine coolant, particularly in the summer. You need an antifreeze in the winter. And you need to have those operating at the right levels. What’s happening in the human stress response is that the human stress response is part of our survival response, and the human survival response depends very, very much upon being able to assess levels of danger.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So if you’re a low level of danger, you might just have something that’s called generalized anxiety disorder, and that means you just kind of worry a little bit about everything a little bit almost all the time. That’s a generalized anxiety disorder. It used to be called neurosis, which is just a fancy thing of saying things that make you have concern or make you nervous. But what happens in the body, when you start having sustained stress responses, is that you, like in a city when a fire alarm goes off the fire department dispatches equipment to put that fire out, when your body’s threat response goes off, one of the primary systems that is triggered is something called the HPA axis.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

It’s a triangle. The hypothalamus and the pituitary are in the head space in the brain, and then the adrenals are like little English postdoctorate graduation caps that you wear for your graduation, that sit on top of the kidneys, and they produce a number of complex stress hormones that when triggered by the hypothalamus sends a signal to the front of the pituitary and that sends a chemical signal to the adrenal glands, which release norepinephrine, epinephrine, you call it adrenaline, and a cascade of dopamine, a cascade of other stress chemicals, which start to trigger the immunity response.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

The immunity response in the human body is one of the first responses that is triggered for like a virus or a bacterial or otherwise. But what happens when stress starts to trigger the HPA response is the immune system starts sending out all of its targeting capacity to find is there a bacterial infection, is there a viral infection, and then it, to use the military term, painting, it paints that invader. You know when they send military out to paint a building for targeting for missiles or otherwise, they use laser-tagging and they call it painting. They paint the target, and then the software can read the target more accurately and put the drone or the smart bomb down, or the guided bomb from a plane down.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

In the same way, the human immune system has to paint targets, and it usually uses antibodies to do this. But if it cannot find something that is paintable, it will like a fire department… they may send out one truck, and then if the fire goes to two alarms, they’re going to send out another piece of equipment, or if they determine that there are toxic chemicals in the building, they’ll bring other chemicals that can smother the oxygen from the fire base. So your immune system works very much. But for every case where the immune system cannot target an invader, it will start to unleash massive amounts and primarily massive amounts of inflammatory chemicals.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So when you look at the respiratory viruses that people die from, the common flu and now we have what’s called corona 19, it’s really not the virus that does the killing. It’s the cytokine storm that is triggered by the immune system. If you have a weak immune system, you’re at a disadvantage. You can also be at a disadvantage if you have a highly strong immune system. If you remember when the MERS and SARS and H1N1 virus came about, lots of younger people died from that virus because they had really strong robust immune systems, and their immune system would go into a cytokine storm.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

The system that NuCalm now is able to communicate to and bring into balance is like cranial nerve 10, which is the vagus nerve, which is the master way that the autonomic nervous system operates and sends its messaging out through. So we can now balance the vagus nerve better. Now the things that our cranial electric stimulator went out to operate on, all of that operation is now carried by the bioresonance disc. The cranial electrotherapy stimulator was helping the ligand gates, these are the receptor sites for amino acids to go in to be created into a neurotransmitter, and now we’re able to directly modulate the organic cation transport carts. These are the little electrical carts that take the neurotransmitter into the brain, and we’re able to up regulate those with the bioresonance disc without having to use the cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

We also were able to create the molecular analogs for all of the amino acids that were in our amino acid cream or tablets, and those are also carried and those frequencies are delivered into the brain through the bioresonance disc. And we have many other modulating signals that help bring about homeostasis into the vagus system, and also into balancing the hypothalamus before it fires off the top signal in the HPA triangle.

 

David Poole

Thank you, Blake. Listen, we’ve got a couple of questions. We’ve got one from Mathu, that’s what’s the best way for us to use NuCalm?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Well, one of the ways I think that’s really useful for using NuCalm is to… if you’ve been a meditator or mindfulness person or anything, set your clock 45 minutes before everyone else gets up in the house, and set your day with doing a NuCalm restore… one of the restore files. I don’t have a particular special file. It depends on the thing, but the Restore 2 is a really robust restoration file. And that gets you going for the thing. Your highest level of cortisol in the mornings starts early in the AM and peaks up around 600 to 700, something like that. That’s why if you look at heart attack, mortality rates, the early morning is one of the biggest areas in which people have fatal heart attacks, because they already have heart issues, and they’re pumping a lot of cortisol that’s running the heart at dysrhythmias that are not good for it.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So I think doing the NuCalm to get you in the right level of tuning to start your day, and then if you have afternoon [inaudible 003530], do a 10 minute power nap, that we have as selections, and that’s just across the board thing that could do something for everyone. That algorithm is a good algorithm through the day.

 

David Poole

Excellent, thank you Blake. We’ve got another question about the disc, and I think we should do a separate conversation entirely. It’s a very complex subject matter.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Mm-hmm.

 

David Poole

So I think maybe next week, same time, we’ll spend a considerable amount of time on that one.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Yeah. And we will be able to give you analogs and other things. We will not be able to give you any technical trade secrets that leave insights to this. It took me five years of development to get this. It was challenging, it was exciting. It’s possibly the most frustrating number of negative results that I ever got, and only in the last year and a half did we start getting… we would get what I think were more like false positives, but we did get it together and it still stands up, and it has really energized what people, I think, know about our company. But yeah, we can spend additional time on the disc if you want to do that.

 

David Poole

Yeah, got a couple more questions here. One from Pablo, why do you get anxiety while using the system? I’ve gotten it once. You get like restless legs, not exactly anxiety. I could not go through the entire track.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

I don’t know if he has restless leg syndrome. Sometimes people, if their restless leg syndrome is a part of the sleep disorder, and if your dopamine is on the edge of not being quite right, and you have that, you could actually drop into a place in low beta, like on one of our restore files, and you would actually get that restless leg, because you had actually dropped into the sleep zone. Now-

 

David Poole

What about the anxiety piece? We’ve certainly seen this over the course of 10 years. Sometimes the first few exposures to NuCalm can trigger what seems to be…

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

That is true. There’s an interesting thing called a laterality disorder. The part of your brain that connects to right and left hemispheres is called the corpus callosum, and it’s a big bridge. It’s actually thicker in women than it is in men. That’s why I always advise that you’re going to have life and death decisions made on a panel, make sure you have some women there, because they have a little bit of the bridge advantage in processing information across the corpus callosum. But you have a laterality disorder, things that should work one way in your body will work in another. For example, let’s say you have a laterality disorder and you drink a cup of coffee and you get really sleepy and want a nap. Well, that’s a paradoxical effect. Non-decaf coffee should make you feel more aroused. It should not make you feel sleepy.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So generally, people with laterality disorders will have an opposite effect to some things. That being said, because of the way NuCalm works, once your brain gets some training, that laterality will begin to abate, because I have frequencies in the neuroacoustic software to help those laterality issues be modulated in a more positive direction. People that have laterality disorders are the biggest group of people that have a real low tolerance to toxicities. There are actually communities around the United States where people that have what we call these environmental illnesses, they park their car at the road and electric golf cart takes them down to their house. I haven’t found all that many people that if they will stick with NuCalm, that will usually come to pass. I would particularly recommend that individual using the NuCalm Pro part of the bio disc.

 

David Poole

Got you. Another question, Dr Holloway, from Carla. Any benefits in taking essential amino acids during a session?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

No. The essential amino acids that you need for the session are encoded in the bioresonance disc. So all of the amino acids that were in the original version of NuCalm, your GABA, your tyrosine, your magnesium, your other [inaudible 004155], amino acid, those are all in there. So you will not be in there at a sustained delivery level immediately to the brain, so you would not be achieving any advantage to orally supplement with amino acids, because we have them there in all the correct balanced ratios, and we have them there in a more powerful form than was actually present in the cream and the tablets.

 

David Poole

Thank you, Blake. Question from George. Are there people for whom NuCalm is not effective?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

There are some genes that people have, either you can… there’s some, you can actually have a genetic misspelling that makes it difficult for you not to be anxious. However, I’ve not done broad broad genetic tests. I’ve done enough genetic tests with some anxious people with those genetic misspellings, and once you can get the GABA in the receptive site of even people with that genetic misspelling. Now, that being said, if you were an unlucky genetic card of the draw person, there are four different genes, if memory gets me correctly, four different genes that could put you in a real difficult period of time. One of those would be for the GABA receptor gene, which I have the organic cation transport mechanism for that, up regulated pretty high up.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

But if that person, to answer the question, if that person had all of the genetic misspellings, that would be a difficult case to manage. But right now, we do have some people when they start with NuCalm, it may take them a couple of weeks to come in to balance. But it’s a pretty rare occasion that people don’t do that. I won’t say that there aren’t occasions where there will be people that won’t do so well, because there’s a wide variance among genetics. But we’ve worked on this for well over two decades now and continue to evolve the platform, and every time we evolve the platform, we get better solutions to more people for what we’re trying to drive forward in people for their wellness and wellbeing.

 

David Poole

Yeah. Dr Holloway, another question from Kim Hirsh. How does using NuCalm in the evening work? Is there a better track that will give you rest but not prevent you from going to sleep? Or how about a routine prior to going to sleep to get better sleep?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

You certainly, in my book, you don’t want to use NuCalm after 400 PM. Your body starts doing a lot of things to prepare you for sleep. Your best algorithm if you’re not doing it is to… you can make up about two hours or a little more in lost sleep with a power nap. With a 10 minute power lap you can restore… It’s almost impossible to restore a sleep deficit, but we have some metrics that certainly indicate that you can restore some lost sleep with that. The biggest thing you need to watch in the evenings with NuCalm and stuff is keep your bright blue light exposure down as much as you can. Blue light from LED lights and everything signals to your eyes and to your hypothalamus that it’s high noon, and that means your melatonin will not bind to your serotonin. So-

 

David Poole

So, Dr Holloway, if you have a sleep disorder and the moment of truth, going to bed every night, causes some anxiety, and is obviously going to disrupt your sleep, and you were going to use NuCalm to really feather the nest and make you more available for sleep, what track would you recommend?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Well, I think probably one of the restore tracks. Now I have some shift workers of probably… I have quite a few nurses. For seem reason, I have nurses in my functional medicine practice. But I think it’s because I’ve trained a lot of nurses in EEG work and for their bio feedback certification in EEG. But shift workers can use NuCalm a little bit differently than non-shift workers do, and with shift workers, I have had them use a whole restore track or something when they come into get themselves de-linked from work because you usually can’t just stride home from work and get into bed. That, I give a little bit different advice, and then in people that are not shift workers.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

I haven’t found it effective to use the longer-term file late in the day for people that are insomniacs or not sleeping well. You’re better to start tuning your body in the morning, and over a period of time that will catch up to… because it has to train your brain. I tell people if you’re going to catch the sleep train, you have to be in the right departure lounge. And that right departure lounge is a narrow range of electrical frequency in the brain. NuCalm’s not always a single silver bullet, an immediate event. It’s a little bit like plowing a field before planting. You plow the planting rows and get them in good shape. You then drop the seeds in and rake the dirt back over the seed, and then something begins to happen.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

So it’s important to understand that NuCalm is also a teaching tool for the brain to entrain the brain, guide the brain just like you would guide a plane up to the jet way. There’s a fellow on the ground with two bright orange reflective paddles, leading the airplane up to the jet way. So if you can’t get in the right departure lounge, or get off in the right departure lounge, you’re not going to get to the destination. So one of the things NuCalm is doing is it’s a device that evokes potentials, and then trains those potentials so they become the preferable pathways in the brain and the nervous system.

 

David Poole

Got you. Dr Holloway, two more questions, and then we’ll break for the night. One, is there any research on NuCalm with bipolar disorder?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

No, we had an article published last year in the Journal of Anxiety and Depression that was done by Dr Ileo Conte at the University of Rome. He is one of the leading bio-signaling specialists using advanced quantum math to pick out. He did an article that was published in the journal of anxiety and depression. I think I have seen… I’ve not seen bipolar depression remitted with NuCalm. I have certainly seen it augment to lower the arousal rate, because once again, the autonomic nervous system goes into sympathetic dominance, which is your fight or flight response.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

I will also say this. There are lots of people, particularly women, that have bipolar disorder… they actually have post-traumatic stress disorder, and it’s misdiagnosed, because when you start looking at an EEG that is going into seizure, it’s real easy to misread that. Unless you’re extremely skillful, you can misread that as bipolar. And sometimes some people even use gabapentin which is a seizure medication that up-regulates the GABA potential in the GABA receptor sites. So you will find that. I’ve seen it augment it. We’ve not done an exclusive study. There are a lot of different ranges in bipolar, so that’s of the reasons it makes it rather difficult.

 

David Poole

Okay, last question from Ross. I occasionally find myself running through my head for the whole 50 minutes. Is it counterintuitive to try to focus on the breath or something similar in order to quiet down?

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

No, it’s absolutely intuitive. One of the things is to shift the placement of your attention, and shifting the placement of your attention is… well, it’s one of the things that’s used in medical hypnosis. Now, I’m talking about a depth of hypnosis where you could rearrange the bones in a person’s hand surgically under medical hypnosis, not anesthesia. There’s not a concrete separate evidence on the bipolar thing, but the systems that we are able to manage would certainly… Some bipolars absolutely I think I the reticular activating system, that’s your sleep cycle. Your reticular system calms down in the evening to go to sleep. It arouses in the morning to wake you up. If you have narcolepsy your reticular system is out of order because it doesn’t stay tonified at one level. It falls out of tone when you’re not expecting it.

 

David Poole

All right folks, well that’s a wrap. A lot of great questions, a lot of great engagement. Thank you, Dr Holloway, for many things.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

You’re welcome.

 

David Poole

NuCalm of course, but the continued pursuit of excellence and efficiency. The next time we talk, we’ll focus a lot on the bio-signal processing disc. It’s a huge curiosity factor. It’s a very fascinating science. It’s very complex too. But also on some of the other therapies and modalities you’ve been involved in over the last 10 years that are quite interesting.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Sure.

 

David Poole

We’ll make this available for download, and keep on NuCalming everybody. Have a great evening.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Okay, yeah. Thanks for being part of our explorer team.

 

David Poole

Indeed. Cheers.

 

Dr. G. Blake Holloway

Thank you.