Melodic or Magnetic? The Best of Purposeful Music and Why it Works with Dan Selene

On his way to living to be over 120 years old, Dan Selene joins this episode of This Is NuCalm to talk in-depth about longevity and the power behind music. Working as a sound engineer, Selene shares his process behind creating soundscapes for NuCalm and Ignite!

Tune in to find out why the NuCalm soundscapes work and why as well as Dan’s personal long-life optimization program.

 

“Whenever you hear nature sounds, those nature sounds come from 3D holophonic microphones that we had back in the record company days and we recorded a series of nature sounds from exotic locales like Sedona Arizona in a vortex night to get those crickets.”

— Dan Selene

 

Listen to This Is NuCalm on Apple & Spotify!

 

Dan Selene of SoundTonics® began his career as an educator, taught at the Krishnamurti School, and co-founded Higher Octave Music. Dan’s mission is to create audio programs, sound environments, and music to inspire everyone to attain their highest level of performance.

 



Key Takeaways

[1:00] David welcomes Dan Selene, the wonderful sound engineer for NuCalm, and asks him how he came to be where he is today, from teaching in Ashrams in India to entrepreneurship and healing sound engineering.

 

[7:50] Dan speaks to the emotional moment he discovered the healing power of music and the miraculous series of moments that changed his life trajectory and brought him to purposeful music.

 

[12:50] Dan meets NuCalm for the first time and finds that deepest place within, the one he’d only reached a few times with TM.

 

[14:10] A musical program is purposeful and by design, Dan shares part of the process and why he builds music to be magnetic, not melodic as well as the equipment and frequencies that he works with.

 

[21:28] Dan talks about the difference between the NuCalm, Ignite, and Tony Robbins’ NLB work.

 

[23:43] The difference between NuCalm sound and off-the-shelf sounds.

 

[25:06] Dan recommends tracks for specific issues: getting to sleep, Deep Recovery is knocking David out, why?

 

[30:21] Working with ancient instruments is something that Dan has been doing for a long time, he shares how special those can be in terms of frequencies.

 

[31:28] Dan explains how he cured himself of an auto-immune disorder in his thirties which launched his personal longevity project, he shares his program and tools with listeners.

 

[36:36] Dan shares what he listens to when he’s not listening to purposeful music.

 

[38:00] Q1: Do you practice TM or only NuCalm?

 

[39:09] Q2: Can you tell us about the sleep tracks?

 

[41:00] Q3: Will new sounds be added soon?

 

[41:48] Q4: Tracks are massive, can you elaborate on the size of the tracks?

 

[42:49] Q5: Is there a difference between NuCalm and binaural beats?

 

[45:00] Q6: How do you translate physics into sounds?

 

[45:54] Q7: Should we repeat the music daily or change up tracks?

 

[46:42] Q8: I’ve not found a good track to relax this week, any tips?

 

[51:43] Q9: I wake up as soon as I hear the track is over?

 

[54:05] Q10: My mind wanders through the whole session, what should I do?

 

[55:21] Q11: What does Theta state feel like?

 

[58:04] Q12: I use deep recovery for sleep, what track do you recommend?

 

[58:39] David Thanks Dan for sharing all of his experience before signing off until next episode.

 

Continue on your journey and until next time, breathe deep, relax, and keep looking forward.

 

Mentioned in this episode

NuCalm

Jiddu Krishnamurti

Eckhart Tolle

SoundTonics

 

This is NuCalm, the show for those looking to improve sleep quality, manage stress, and boost recovery. Brought to you by Solace Lifesciences, the makers of NuCalm, the world’s only patented and proven neuroscience technology that works within minutes, without drugs, every time! In over one million medical sessions, NuCalm has helped men and women around the world.

 

NuCalm: stress relief for the way we live today, technology to help you disconnect.


Full Transcript

David Poole
It gives me great pleasure to introduce Dan Selene. Dan is an amazing human being. He’s been unbelievably beneficial to us with NuCalm, and I appreciate his talents every single day, because before Dan we had access to four tracks, I was addicted to one. I’ve got my own peculiar OCDs. And now, I mean, Dan’s part of my life every day, I want to do a NuCalm. So tonight we’re going to talk openly about Dan’s passion, Dan’s drive. Another thing that’s interesting about Dan is he’s on a quest to live to be over 120 and I think it’s a layup for him to get there.

David Poole
You can see him on the screen here. He’s a little bit older than I am and he’s in much better shape, so I like his chances. But let’s get started, Dan with your journey through life. What pivots, turns, surprises and walk us through how you got here today.

Dan Selene
Well, thank you for inviting me first of all, and hope I could be helpful to the Mastermind Group. The things we’re going to talk about tonight are things that I have hardly ever think about, which is the past. So I really had to apply myself a little bit and even after I talked to David this afternoon, a few more things came into my mind and I’m thinking, “Oh my God, I totally had forgotten about that and that was such an amazing experience.” But you could say that my journey with music really started 37 years ago, and I have now been doing it for half my life. So I was a late bloomer and I didn’t really find my purpose until a specific day happened in 1984.

Dan Selene
Before that, during my 20s, I always had a bit of a discontent because I grew up in the Midwest and I had a very normal life where I went to college, I became a school teacher. I really enjoyed that, but I knew that that was not my purpose, but I didn’t know what my purpose was. So I started reading books, I just knew that there was something more that existed. So, at a certain point, when I really realized that I wasn’t going to fit in, and this is after about six years of teaching, which I really enjoyed, but then I realized I needed to do something different.

Dan Selene
So as usual, when things got to… before you could make a break through, there’s usually a break down and that’s what happened. And so I basically took off and traveled around the world. I spent two years in my 20s traveling around the world on one trip, which was about over a year. I had a 20 pound pack and it was as late as could be and I took a motorcycle from Amsterdam down to Athens, and I went across Asia over to India. And I was always looking for the purpose in life basically. And I kept all this advice as I was going across Asia.

Dan Selene
And I’d do things like be up all night long on a train in Pakistan, miserable. And it was like I didn’t mind it at all, it was just something I knew I was just going through it. I mean, I was actually very happy, it was a very freeing experience, not to be mowed down by comforts that didn’t even matter to me. And as many people before me, including The Beatles and so many people, I ended up in Rishikesh in Northern India, and I had my own first awakening there. And basically it was that there’s nobody outside of oneself that’s going to give us the answers, that everything’s inside.

Dan Selene
And that directly relates to the programs I’m doing today with NuCalm, which I call in my mind that the inner journey series, really. So I had that experience and I came back after a year. Actually, I think after having just an amazing life in India for three months, I never got sick one day. Then on the last day, when I went into the Nepal, I came down with hepatitis and I was like seven days, I think, into a track and it was one of those things where I could have died there and somehow came through and I remember thinking I was ready to go, if that was it, that was it.

Dan Selene
But I came back and I found one philosopher that I really appreciated, a guy named J. Krishnamurti, who had a similar message to Eckhart Tolle. And I came the first in the first group of teachers at a school he had an Ojai. And it was like an ashram type of a school and we got $500 a month plus room and board. And it was a phenomenal experience and he would come and be there three months a year, we’d have dinner together and things like that. So I did that and then I realized there was a certain point when you get into your 30s as a male, it’s like, “Wait a second.” You start to think about, you do want to get the material question handled.

Dan Selene
And so I thought that something arose in me that, “Okay, I did that.” And it was the highlight of my teaching career, it was my 10th year, I thought I was ready to do something else. So I set off on my next journey, which was to be an entrepreneur and my method was I would get all the sound tools and programs that they had at the time and study those basically. And there were things like what we’re doing now, and it’s very infancy back then, that was in like the late ’70s, early ’80s. So I did that for a period of time, I left the teaching role and it’s very challenging to go from being a teacher to an entrepreneur.

Dan Selene
So I spent four years of pretty intense struggle, it was also great at the same time, but it was kind of a struggle. And then I get to a point where things got very, very difficult and it was almost… in the ’80s we had a big recession, it was almost like now, except I was the only one that was really as affected as I was, which was very disheartening. So I was in that situation and it lasted quite a while and then I got to a point where it became totally intolerable to do any kind of work that was just to get by. I mean, things I didn’t want to be doing, like trying to sell things to people or just things that weren’t in my heart.

Dan Selene
So at one point I just let everything go and I said, “No matter what happens, I’m just not going to do this anymore.” And I just left everything. And that was in 1984, and I went on a trip up to Northern California to Mill Valley and I went to a yoga class, I think it was, and there was a sign there that said, “Expect a miracle,” from of course, the miracles I believe. And I remember saying to myself, because I was really almost like a nervous breakdown type of a thing, where it’s like I really had a difficult period. And I just remember saying to myself, “That’s what I need, is a miracle.”

Dan Selene
And that very afternoon, I went to a used record store in Mill Valley, which was a famous store at the time. And I picked up a couple of albums and one was by Kitaro, what I remember, who was a new age artist in the early ’80s like that. And when I played that music, something shifted inside and I felt like I was plugged into a universal energy. And I had no experience in music before that, I mean, I loved it, but I never would have dreamed I would be doing anything with it. And even when I heard that, I just was enthralled for myself and it was so healing that it was something I just couldn’t take off.

Dan Selene
I would be listening to one album for days. And at the time I lived in Santa Barbara, when I got back to Santa Barbara, I was walking along the beach and listening to the music. And the next thing you know, I met a guy who had a radio program on and it was one of the first new age radio programs on in the country. And he was at the Santa Barbara College, I think. And so we became friends because I was so into the music and he was like an expert. And then in a few months, his wife inherited enough money to buy two houses in Montecito. And so we took 10% and that became the financing for the first thing, which was going to be a syndicated radio program. It was such a miracle, it was amazing.

Dan Selene
Also, when I got back from that trip, I got a call one morning at about eight o’clock in the morning, no one ever called at eight o’clock. And it was a person I used to be the teacher of her kids in Ojai and she said basically, “I’ll pay you whatever you need to live on, if you could help me do such and such.” And she had this project she wanted me to do. And it was the answer to my dreams. It was such a respite from the regular world of how people live that I just felt like I was in an exalted place. And then in six months I met my partner who started the record company, he started the record company, but he was much more experienced in business and had been a management agent in Los Angeles and so forth.

Dan Selene
So that was the origin story of how we started Higher Octave Music, that company. And what’s amazing is that that lasted for 20 years of my life, that experience. And that’s very rare for a record company. And then after the 20 years, then my next step was to be, and I used to say, it’s purposeful music. That’s what I wanted to do. And again, the whole 20 years, I was also listening to every sound tool I could. I was avidly working on things, I would make my own programs, make my own music and all that.

Dan Selene
So then I thought I was prepared to do that after that time. Then after that, I studied another four years studying NLP, hypnotherapy and various other techniques, alternative techniques that I wanted to combine with the music and make these master programs. And my goal was to have a program that someone, no matter how much they needed help, they just put on their headphones and they’d get a relief from that program. And like a glimpse of a real life, which is more of an inspiring scenario, how life really is, which is there’s more than what meets the eye. And there’s more to life than what most people are experiencing.

Dan Selene
So after that four year period, I decided… Oh, then 2008 came and that was another one of those disruptive moments. When your world is destabilized, that’s part of the hero’s journey. It always starts with your world being destabilized and at that time I thought, “I need to do some things now,” because I was in my ’60s, I think. “I want to do some things now that who knows what the world’s going to be like?” That I just want to make sure I get those in. And one of them was, I loved to ski. So I moved here just outside of Park City to ski at Deer Valley and I spent five years doing a ski sabbatical.

Dan Selene
And during that five years, I was out in nature four to six hours a day, every season, because my soul was craving that at the time, just to be in nature. And during that time I made a thousand programs that I still have on my computer today with various types of music and that’s where I come up with the first thing I did with NuCalm, it was one of those programs that I got the idea for the music in those early days. So that was five years more there and a skied about 8,000 miles downhill, I had a GPS with me all the time. And I just loved it.

Dan Selene
I did that because I wanted to do something that I loved so much that I could transition into my third career. I did 10 years as a teacher, 20 years in the record company. I thought, ” I’m going to do 30 years at my next thing and that’s going to be based on what I love to do the most.” Which was doing the purposeful music. So I just kept moving in that direction and then in 2016, when I met Jim and I heard NuCalm for the first time, it was like another moment of… and I told him, I think this is a calling, and that got us to here.

David Poole
Amazing. So walk me through your first experience with NuCalm and how you knew it was one of those special moments for you.

Dan Selene
When I traveled to India, I really was into meditating. And one time I did TM, I did that every day for five years, morning and evening. I loved it, I still love it. But I didn’t keep it up during that part of my life, and so the first day I did NuCalm, I did it in the morning and it was one thing. And then in the evening it was confirmed to me that, that is that place, that deepest place that I had been to, that’s what I was experiencing. I just said, “This is for me. I love it.” I think I’ve done it every day since.

David Poole
Yeah. And you’ve got a very exhaustive habit, NuCalm we appreciate that. So, well, walk us through, Dan everyone on this call and myself including Erica, we’re very curious. I mean, we can’t hear the physics, you can’t hear the algorithm. We listened to the music schematics you build, can you walk us through how you design a track, how you find inspiration? What a program is like?

Dan Selene
Yeah. I think one thing I wanted everyone to know is that what we do, it’s not masking sounds. We’re not masking the science per se. What I’m working on is actually enhancing the science so that the experience is even deeper if possible and we’re always working on improving that. And one of the things is that the music is not melodic, but it’s magnetic. It has to be magnetic not melodic, because if it’s melodic, your mind can get caught in certain loops or certain memories, or brings up certain emotions, and that’s not what we want. It’s more to be clear. So we work on making the music magnetic so that people can still be totally engaged with it until they go into that, maybe they go into the other state. But it doesn’t hook you like a melody hooks one.

Dan Selene
The second thing is that we combined acoustic and electronic instruments, and ancient and futuristic instruments. And we really looked for sounds that people haven’t heard before. And if anyone’s been listening to Deep Recovery, just an example, just in the second three minutes segment, there’s just some resonances and vibrations that are quite unusual. And then in the next section, there’s a Tibetan singing bowl that really carries that segment of that track. Then there’s eight segments altogether, it’s kind of going through this certain journey. And that’s part of keeping it magnetic without having a really strong melody any place, it really hooks you.

Dan Selene
Third is, whatever you hear in nature sounds, those nature sounds come from a 3D holophonic microphone that we had back in the record company days. And we recorded a series of nature sounds from exotic locales, not necessarily exotic, but Sedona, Arizona, like Vortex night to get those crickets, the Big Sur in the morning for the ocean and birds. And we wanted to get really an amazing healing stream, and so we found a stream at a monastery in Japan. One of our producers was there. And so the monks there put the rocks in certain places, so the stream had a certain resonance.

Dan Selene
So those are the types of environments that we put in. And we mix those in sometimes with some of the music. And just as a thing people might not know, but when you hear birds, that’s a signal to the unconscious mind that everything is safe because as hunter and gatherers our brains were always looking for danger. And that was one of the signals that things were clear in nature as the birds are singing.

Dan Selene
And then besides that, the fourth thing we’d do is we put in some universal healing frequencies, and two of them are, really the two now we’re using are, solfeggio of 528, which I’ll describe in a second and a 432 tuning. And both of those really are Dr. Holloway’s recommendations. Even more he really wanted those. And so that was part of what we wanted to do and he said that would really enhance the underlying science.

Dan Selene
So the solfeggio tone, that’s like a note and you can hear that in all of the recovery tracks, all three of them. In the first track, you can pick up that note at the very beginning, actually that’s something people can meditate on and you can just stay focused on that note and it goes to the very end. A lot of times you won’t recognize it, because other things are going on, but it’s there all the way through. And if you really listen, you can hear it. And it’s the very first sound and the last sound. So you know what that sounds like.

Dan Selene
But really the reason it’s there is that tone has been recognized as something that allows the body to relax and heal. It’s called the miracle tone. And there was a study in 2018, when was it? Yeah, 2018 in Japan that said that people could start to release stress within about five minutes with that tone. So there’s studies on it as well, but it’s generally recognized. And you can see for yourself, you can feel that.

Dan Selene
In the second recovery track, the first 15 minutes does not have that tone, but it starts after that in the meditation portion. And then in the third recovery track, it’s actually in the instruments, we have either a vocal or a flute or a violin playing that tone. And it also is the first thing you hear when the track starts and the last thing when the track is over. So that’s one way to actually experience that and not just read about it or hear about it, but feel it for yourself every day or whenever you want to.

Dan Selene
Then the 432 it’s a frequency, that everything is attuned to that frequency. All the 200 albums I did with Higher Octave, the standard frequency is 440, that everything is tuned at. But the 432 has some special properties that are linked to nature and linked to the mathematics of the universe and sacred geometry. So how you can experience that as with the power nap two, and with the new deep recovery track. And so you can see for yourself what that feels like. So with those aspects, those are all built to help accentuate the science and support everything that Dr. Holloway is doing.

David Poole
That’s amazing. Dan it might be nice to, maybe we can catalog some of these things are indicators. I didn’t realize there were a couple of yawns embedded in power nap one until you told me, now I can’t not hear them, right? Like a Where’s Waldo thing. Very interesting. So, how do you come up with these phenomenon, you and your team, what do you-

Dan Selene
First, I’m really into the science myself and often I start listening just to that and seeing what starts to come into my mind. And then I’ve also, of all the years of experience of listening to everything else that’s out there, probably I’m connecting dots from everything I’ve ever done. But there seems to be a vision that comes just even doing other NuCalm sessions. Something comes in that bubbles up that this feels like this would be the right thing for this particular track. And it’s not something you can’t really make happen, it’s got to come to you and it always does. It’s very interesting how that works. The ideas start to flow and then we just start, we work on different sounds that would fit with that and the track just starts to be developed.

David Poole
What about your work with Ignite? Because those are two polar opposite kind of phenomenon. So sometimes when you’re searching for a NuCalm tune and does Ignite kind of pop into your heads like uh, oh.

Dan Selene
Two different things, but I love the Ignite tracks. I mean, I’ve listened to those avidly, the ones we have now, and I’ve got several that we’re putting together. And for the gym and for my skiing and my mountain biking and things like that, I love the Ignite tracks. That was the first thing I did with Jim was to make them an Ignite track. That was one of the tests that I went through when we got started.

David Poole
How’d you like working with Tony’s NLP stuff when we got that catalog?

Dan Selene
The hardest project I’ve done would be the Tony Robbins project with the Golden State Warriors, I think it was, well, both of them. Where in each of those I did 10 straight days, day and night and I loved it because I learned so much, I started to absorb all of the principles and the lessons. So it was phenomenal. And so it wasn’t something that was played all the way through. I picked out the key moments and then put them to the music, because one of the things that happens when you’re reprogramming yourself or transforming your state of mind and so forth is that if you could connect the emotion with the words, that’s when it really goes in and means something.

Dan Selene
And Tony would be the first to say that, then he’s like incantations. And so it’s beyond affirmations, it’s like you really put your energy into it. And so I matched his key words and key teachings with that emotional feeling. And that’s what people can feel when they’re listening to that. And I think I listened to that, I mean, for probably 30, I mean, 30, 50 times, I don’t know, I’ve listened to it so many times from the time I started music, I first did it, and then myself, I used it in the gym and it was phenomenal.

David Poole
Can we talk for a minute about, there’s hundreds, maybe thousands of vinyl beat apps out there, there’s meditation apps. What’s the difference, because we’ve been trying to explain it for years. It used to be a really exciting subject matter for us now it’s really raw and I’m fatigued by it. But how would you best summarize the difference between just getting something off the shelf, listening to natural sounds, White Noise versus what you get with NuCalm?

Dan Selene
Well, the reason I was excited most practically about NuCalm was that I could do the soundtracks, because that’s what I wanted to hear, because I’ve been avidly working with these types of things for years, and they all have their value. I think they all have a value to somebody, people are in different stages of their journey. But for myself, I never heard or felt anything as powerful as when I did the first NuCalm session. And that’s before we had the discs, that was really a different level practically, but it was phenomenal. And I could be listening to anything every day, I’m always looking for great music and great things to get inspired by.

Dan Selene
But I love to spend my time with NuCalm. I try to do one session and try to do one session in the morning, usually just as I’m getting up. A 50-minute session and then a power nap in the afternoon, as a minimum and often another session in the early evening. I’ve never really felt anything else that compares.

David Poole
You want to talk for a minute, we get a lot of these questions all the time. I know Erica does on the front lines a lot, can we talk through some of the algorithms that might make sense for different people at different times. So say I’ve got sleeping issues, very common phenomenon and a big request for us. What track would you recommend for someone who’s trying to go to sleep and stay asleep through the night? So this is a primer to get them into that sleep state. What would you choose?

Dan Selene
Well, I think that usually what’s been recommended that I’ve read from other people is that they don’t use the NuCalm 2.0 at night, which would be the relaxing recovery tracks, because it could keep you up. I’ve not found that myself because I do those sometimes without the disc for sleep, because then they don’t put you into that other state, but they’re still very relaxing and have a certain energy for that. And actually any of those could work for that only because we just finished it, I’ve really been working a lot with the Deep Recovery track these past few weeks. And I’ve found that very powerful for that time and also for the morning.

Dan Selene
As part of what I do now, I work very late because that’s when the energies flows for musicians and I work with other musicians. And so, starting my time, 1000 maybe till midnight or one o’clock, that’s normal for me. And so when I get up in the morning sometimes it’s just, I’m not quite ready. And so I put on the Deep Recovery or one of the other recovery tracks, and that’s a great way to start the day. If I haven’t had a really deep sleep or didn’t have a chance to have the sleep, as long as I wanted to. I would say that maybe you wouldn’t want to do the power naps then because they would be a little, maybe a little disruptive to the sleep.

Dan Selene
But I haven’t had any problem myself with the 2.0, but I’m such an avid user that I wouldn’t necessarily recommend that to somebody else. It’s just my experience. But I would say any of those, Deep Recovery is working for everything for me right now.

David Poole
When do you use the power nap tracks, Dan?

Dan Selene
Late afternoon. I love them for late afternoon. Sometimes if I don’t have time in the morning for a longer track, I would do it in the morning as well. I think it’s very good to maintain that morning in between feel. So you don’t jump into the day with email and with getting back to life as it was, you buy a little space when you have either the power nap or the 2.0, because remember the 2.0 you don’t need to, or the recovery tracks, those can be shorter. Those can be a half hour, you don’t need to have them be the full 15 minutes unless you need that. So I find the nap anytime 20 minutes, anytime I can get that in, I would do that.

David Poole
What’s so new and special about the Deep Recovery? I can’t speak for Erica, but it feels like I’m in a fight with Mike Tyson and get knocked out in the first round. I mean, it’s really potent for me, and I’ve been doing NuCalm for many years.

Dan Selene
Yeah. It could be that your nervous system needs more rest. I mean, it could be that it’s signaling that that’s something that you could let it play out, do it a couple of hours at some point, and just see what that feels like.

David Poole
Interesting.

Dan Selene
One of the reasons it’s so deep is because that was the first one we did during this quarantine, this COVID-19 period. And we were home for, whatever that period of time was. We started it before, but when we finished it, we really did a lot of work on it was during that time. And I just felt like I needed to go deeper, just in light of all that was going on, I just wanted to go as deep as possible. And I think that that’s what was going on there.

Dan Selene
Also, I had that in mind for a sleep program, we were working on which we’re going to be doing in the future. And while I was working on that, I thought, it’s interesting, we’re going to do this and people are going to fall asleep in 15 minutes regardless. And as you can tell, it’s very detailed all the way through every minute. And while I was doing it, I was thinking, “Boy, this is amazing. It just keeps going like this like it needs more and more.” And then at the end I realized it wasn’t supposed to be for sleep, it was supposed to be for that deep recovery.

Dan Selene
And I think that that’s why it became that way. It’s very powerful, but I find it very… because I’ve done it so much, I’ve kind of gone through the stages where I need more rest with that one. And so I come out of it and feel really great.

David Poole
We just got some feedback from someone from the FBI Hostage Rescue Team, and he’d done a 14-hour shift and he did deep recovery for over six hours.

Dan Selene
That’s what I’m saying.

David Poole
Pretty interesting feedback about that recovery side.

Dan Selene
Maybe that’s also the 432 Hertz is in there. The whole thing is too, 432 it’s a good experience for people to know that, that’s part of it. And then part of it is there’s eight segments and it brings you through different, almost different chambers or it goes through different spaces and it is different than any of the tracks we’ve done before actually in that way then it’s so pronounced. So it’s a real journey all the way through. So really you could listen to it a long time because it doesn’t get old because there’s so many different things that are going on, even though a lot of people won’t even recognize that because they’re just in an altered state very quickly, but over time, you’ll see that there’s really a lot there.

David Poole
How do you research and find ancient instruments? You talked about using ancient and kind of futuristic.

Dan Selene
Well, the ancient, it’s just things like the Tanpura, various Indian instruments, things like the sitar. I don’t know if that’s ancient, but the thing with it, in the sitar, there’s, I think 30 strings that aren’t even played, they’re just resonances. And so that’s what we like is when we have those resonances, because that also amplifies the science underneath. And so it’s just something we’ve collected over years and that it could be tuning forks could be anything like that.

Dan Selene
And for the futuristic type sounds, we are always looking for just different sounds. And there are several and Deep Recovery as an example. The idea is we want sounds that people haven’t heard before. And so it’s something that is novel for the novel where they’re going to be feeling as they get into the deeper states, more relaxed states.

David Poole
Let’s shift gears for a moment and just talk about your longevity project. What’s your recipe for optimal health? In fact you’re skiing, let’s say 800 miles a season?

Dan Selene
In five years I did 8,000 miles, but I’ve shifted gears a little bit. What happened to me was at a certain point, I ended up getting my first ever real serious health problem and I had an autoimmune disorder. And it was one of those things where there’s no cure for it, they say you just have to live with it, and make the best of it or whatever. Spondylitis was a back thing and it’s in the genes and all that. So when I heard that, I thought, “Wow, what does that mean?” And so after doing my own research, I realized that the antidote was exercise and I’ve always been into exercise, noticed by the skiing and so forth, but I wasn’t an avid gym goer or anything like that. I was always wanting to be outside.

Dan Selene
However, after that I changed my diet. I took all the classes at the National Association of Sports Medicine, became a personal trainer for myself, also a corrective exercise specialist, senior fitness specialist, nutrition specialist, all the classes that they have. And I applied those to myself and I did that with programs as well. Where I would have words to myself about visualizing myself being in perfect health and having total great posture in my 80s and this whole thing, I had a whole visualization that I put together and basically worked on that. That was I think in 2012. And I actually built myself into better health than I’ve ever had been in my life.

Dan Selene
I stopped doing gluten, so gluten causes inflammation. And so I wanted to get rid of all the inflammation. I started doing what’s called cryotherapy, which you experienced when you were here. And that’s where you go into this chamber with nitrogen, I think it is. And it goes down to about 300 degrees, but it’s not really cold as funny as that is, it’s cold but it’s not cold like being out when it’s 20 below in Minnesota. And so I did that about, I don’t know, over 500 times, over three years. I was doing five days a week of that.

Dan Selene
So that, NuCalm, the right diet and the exercise. Even in my house, I keep a gym in my house downstairs. I’m in movement all during the day. I believe the body needs to be moving, I’ve got an inversion table, so I’m hanging upside down, mini trampoline, so you get the lymph nodes, the lymphs clearing out. Infrared sauna, things like that, tools to have around that are easy to access. And if you don’t have that, just being outdoors and walking, but somehow keeping the body in motion all the time.

Dan Selene
And I really treat my body like a temple. I totally treat it the best I can and to me it’s all fun and interesting. It’s fascinating to see what can be done and try to get better every day and have good habits.

David Poole
What’s your sleep like, how many hours of sleep do you try and get a night?

Dan Selene
I try to get seven and then do NuCalm, the last one to one and a half in the morning. That seems to be ideal. And the sleep is great. It hasn’t always been great. I’d say NuCalm has helped tremendously, I definitely had an issue during part of the time in the last 10 years, but now it’s excellent.

David Poole
So you said that your first job was, first crew is 10 years, your second was 20s, then mid 30s, so that’s four years ago. So you have 26 more years. So how many more tracks are you going to create in 26 years?

Dan Selene
I intend to create as much of a catalog as I can create. That’s my goal for as long as I’m alive, basically. I’d like them to get better and better, deeper and deeper, and try all different kinds of music. As you know, I’m doing not just the meditative music, but the music for Ignite as well. And we’re going to get some outside tracks with license, but also we’re doing some. And that’s such a full spectrum of things to be doing. That’s what makes me probably the happiest is being totally immersed because you’re in the flow in doing that and there’s nothing that compares to that.

Dan Selene
And in the flow like that, you’re also receiving all this inspiration from whatever the sources are, the news that comes in and it’s extremely gratifying and there’s nothing more enjoyable than doing a NuCalm session and having ideas come in and think, “Wow, I’m working right now.” It’s the greatest.

David Poole
Excellent. Let’s do a little bit of exercise here, what do you listen to if you’re not listening to the programs you’ve created? Who’s your favorite pop artist?

Dan Selene
I don’t really look at it that way. What I’ve been really enjoying recently, it’s I go on YouTube and I look for great live performances. And I try to find performances that give me the chills, that I just want to listen to over and over again. And just recently I was listening to, I watched the documentary on Coachella and I saw that there was a Prince performance of the Radiohead song Creep. So I looked that up and that was also aligned and that’s an example of, wow, it was just phenomenal. And it could be any kind of music just across the board, I’ve listened to a lot.

Dan Selene
Even sounds strange, but Folsom Prison Blues by Johnny Cash from that album, there was something about that live album that is it’s just a statement. There’s something that’s there where you just feel that even though you think it’s as far ways, you can think of it in the kind of music I like. But it can be that it can be any of the… I like all the great classic and not so much pop, but the rock artists. So I like music across the board, but I really focus on this stuff we’re doing because that’s my favorite of all.

David Poole
Excellent. Well, let’s move toward some questions here, Dan. So we can get you back to work, because I know your day job starts in a couple hours. Question from Philip, do you still practice TM or NuCalm only?

Dan Selene
Right now, I’m doing NuCalm only, but I still know my mantra. I still appreciate that system. It was a great place to start. But now I love the, I put the headphones on, and also keep in mind I’m working on new things all the time. And so it’s very exciting for me to try new things. And so basically that covers maybe two hours a day of NuCalm, or various aspects of NuCalm. So I don’t really have the time, but I totally respect and appreciate TM definitely. I got a lot out of it, did it for five years, as I said, every day.

David Poole
Did you ever try and use your mantra during an early stage NuCalm?

Dan Selene
That’s a great question because I had never even thought about it, but no, I haven’t. Now I just go, I’m so used to it and it goes very deep, very fast. My whole meditation practice has just taken it to another level. And that’s all I do now with that.

David Poole
Question from Mitch, can you tell us about the sleep tracks, they sound awesome? And tell you Mitch, I was with Dan, Jim and I were out at Dan’s place in January when he first tried trying the new physics, and it’s not new. We’ve had that for 10 years. We move very slowly. And we don’t share anything with anybody and Dan didn’t even know we had it and then he did it and it was a mind bender. But you can give a little sneak preview, the team you have and the people you have on today are mastermind people that are always going to have first access to our new tech, especially in a testing phase.

Dan Selene
Well, you’re going to love it because I remember when I used it the first night and then they came back, then Jim and David came back the next day, I was so inspired that actually that was the inspiration for the deep recovery track originally, before I realized that it really wasn’t for that. So I’ve got plenty of other things for that. But what happens so consistently is after 15 minutes, it goes off and I’m the kind of person where I would play it all night long, but it’s not for all night long, it’s only for going to sleep.

Dan Selene
And so you have to be sure it’s not on auto repeat it, because then it’s really too much. Then you do get groggy if you got it all on which I did all night long all and it didn’t work that well only because of that. But if I wake up in the middle of the night for anything, I put it back on and after about 15 minutes, the next thing you know it’s morning. So I am so excited about that and that’s actually on the agenda for after Ignite next year. And I’ll be working on it until then actually, that’s the great part. I’ve plenty of time and it’s just I’m very excited about everything with that science and that’s really props to Dr. Hollo way, did a brilliant job on that.

David Poole
No. I used it for my son for years and I never thought about it for the consumer. Question from Leslie, will new tracks be added to the lineup soon? I can answer that. Dan is about to embark on a sprint, to put together some unbelievable tracks over the next 10 weeks based on new tech, you can talk a little about the advances if you want, or if you’re just keeping trade secrets, it’s up to you Dan.

Dan Selene
Only the fact that I’m planning on going into a zone really starting about tomorrow because I’ve got things lined up and they’re going to be doing a lot of 432 tracks, and I’m really excited about it. I’ve gotten a lot of new gear, new sounds. I want to have things again that are totally fresh, people haven’t heard before and we’re going to be on it. It’s going to be total immersion for me for a couple of months.

David Poole
A question from Anthony, curious about complexity and size of tracks. I’ve heard a number of times the team discussed the size of tracks being massive 700 megabytes. Yet all tracks download and take up only one gigabyte of space combined, that works out to blah, blah, blah. Can you kindly elaborate on the size of the tracks?

Dan Selene
Well, originally they were in that 700 range because we were using wave files and we were making them that intense. But now we’re doing ACCs and we’re doing some other styles because that was taking up a little bit too much space. But the tracks might have 30 or 40 layers, sometimes more, so that’s part of it.

David Poole
Yeah, Anthony. That was a business decision that I was forced to make a while ago. We had four tracks originally, so four gigabytes is not too invasive as the catalog advanced, 12 gigabyte just for the tracks alone was a little obnoxious for us. So we had to move to a compression algorithm. Alison asked, can you please explain again, what is the difference between NuCalm program and binaural beats?

Dan Selene
There are binaural beats within the NuCalm program, you can’t hear them because they’re under the surface. And Dr. Holloway, I think he’s been on the group, hasn’t he? And he talked about that.

David Poole
Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yep.

Dan Selene
So you don’t hear them because we have the music over those, but they’re there and we actually wrap those and other types of sounds that he thinks would accentuate those and make those even more powerful. So the NuCalm tracks have that built in.

David Poole
And I can expand on a little bit, Tom, Alison. Binaural beats, it goes back to the invention story with Dr. Holloway. If there was something off the shelf, he would have used it, remember, he was trying to resolve acute stress for people suffering from PTSD and addiction. The highest form of anxiety you can have. And binaural beats are interesting and they’re in a native design. The brain develops a tolerance for them very quickly. Your brain has special powers and its primary job is to keep you alive. And it needs to be aware of your environment to do that. So it loves being tricked for moments and it’ll happen. So Dr. Holloway invented the non-linear oscillatory algorithm. It’s delivered in a binaural beat kind of wrapper, but it’s a much more sophisticated.

David Poole
So nonlinear means there’s no pattern to it and the oscillatory piece means we’re always changing it. So that’s what keeps that… and Dan can speak to this, I’ve done NuCalm twice a day for over 10 years now, I’ve never been able to beat it. I have different sessions a lot, this afternoon, I did one for 20 minutes. I just need to read, but I worked it at 400 in the morning and got up early and I was on phone calls all day and it was just kind of coming unglued. And then instead of going for a motorcycle ride, which I probably, I love motorcycle rides are my meditation. I signed NuCalm for about eight or nine minutes I was like… and then I will go 40 minutes later. I mean, it took me for a loop like it always does.

Dan Selene
Yeah. Me too.

David Poole
Got a question from Chi, how you translate we have a non-linear dynamic algorithm pattern into a music track, as in how you visualize and make the music. So the question is, the underlying physics, Dan, how do you take that? Because you say you listened to it and it gives you inspiration and you just try to kind of follow the belief system in that algorithm. How does that work for you?

Dan Selene
Well, I just know where it’s going. And so that’s part of the thing, that was more the early days, but now that I know where we’re going, the destination every time. And so that’s what I start to think about, is what’s most interesting or deepest way we can get to that destination, which is that deep theta state where you go into the autonomic nervous system.

David Poole
Excellent. Got a question from Joloweng, forgive me if I’m not pronouncing your name correctly. Would it be best to repeat the music daily or change the track to get into a deeper relaxation?

Dan Selene
Well, I think it’s good to have some variety. I think if you haven’t tried different things just to try and see what they’re like, that can have a different effect just because of what the music is, but you’ll still go to the same deep place. But usually what happens is people are on one track for a while and then they like that, so they keep on going with that. Because they can be like a signal and they just go with the signal. But if you can try different ones, I think that a variety will make it even more interesting.

David Poole
Excellent. Got a question from Martin. Any tips for getting more out of NuCalm, so far despite daily, he says nuclear, but I know he means NuCalm sessions, Martin, I can see you. In the past few weeks, no track has managed to switch off my mind or get me to a meditative state. My mind still focuses on whatever stressful thought is on my mind.

Dan Selene
And I just like to know, what happens? What is the experience?

David Poole
Martin, you can speak to Dan directly, I just unmuted your line.

Martin
Yeah. I mean, for me, although it’s pleasurable listening to NuCalm, I’m not feeling any of the experiences that you keep talking about. I’m still just very conscious, my mind is still, whatever racing thoughts is going through my mind or whatever problems in the day. So far I’m not getting it and I’m doing at least two hours a day, because I know that I need to. I’ve had some very stressful experiences and I’m using this to help me, but so far I’m just not getting it. I mean, I might as well just be listening to the radio.

Dan Selene
And how long has it been?

Martin
Three weeks I’ve been doing this.

Dan Selene
Three weeks and you’re talking even Deep Recovery you’ve done?

Martin
Yes.

Dan Selene
And you haven’t had a feeling from that, that releases you from your thinking?

Martin
No, absolutely not.

Dan Selene
And what time of the day do you do that?

Martin
I’m mainly doing a session in the morning when I first wake up. I mean, my sleep is disturbed anyway, so that’s another problem. So I use it, I usually do one of the recovery tracks recovery 2 or 3 first thing in the morning. And then I’m using the deep recovery in the afternoon between 200 and 400.

David Poole
So Martin, I can take this one, Dan. I’m very curious, here’s what we do know and everybody’s got their own mental capabilities. There’s something called locus of control and locus of control is your ability to really defend yourself and it doesn’t matter size, gender. But I can promise you after 13,000 subjects of NuCalm and a lot of feedback, we had a lot of people like, “Yeah. It doesn’t work.” Looking at the biomarkers, the ones we care about, HRV, galvanic skin response, QEG and with a 32 CZ markers on your brain, you’re getting into parasympathetic nervous system dominance. Most of our brains don’t shut up, mine just goes into kind of a dream state.

David Poole
There’s definitely times where I can focus for a few minutes longer than I want to. I want it to take me away. But the net outcome of you achieving parasympathetic nervous system dominance and homeostasis never doesn’t work, not one time in 13,000 subjects. So it really doesn’t matter about the actual psychological experience is almost irrelevant. I can promise you, if you’re borrowing a lab and hook you up with the markers, you’re no different than every other subject. And these are subjects with very extreme cases. And we were doing people with six years of reported insomnia, very diseased. So we’ll get you on with Dr. Holloway. We’ll give you some tips and techniques to quiet the monkey mind but keep on doing it too.

Martin
Yeah. I’m just trying to find out how long it would take, because I’ll say by now I would be… I’m just hoping that soon it’ll start to clicking and I’m very committed to the program. I’m not questioning the program in any way.

David Poole
No, no, I totally get that. Trust me-

Martin
For me, it’s just not working.

David Poole
10 years ago was I’m like, “Holy shit, NuCalm doesn’t work. Oh my God, it didn’t work with Martin.” And we were always like that, because we did that. We’d go to your house, Martin, we’d NuCalm and we get your feedback. We say, “Hey, what’d you think?” And you’d be like… Like, “Oh no. Oh dear.” Then it was our friends at Harvard and NASA who started looking at the data and say, “There’s something really interesting here guys. There’s something really… Doesn’t matter the context or the disease state, we can have someone coming on crystal meth and boom they’re in that parasympathetic state in three minutes, like everybody else.”

David Poole
So do know this Martin, and we work with very challenging cases. You’re getting benefit, so that investment you’re putting in, and I can tell you’re committed. Most people would stop after two sessions, like, “It doesn’t work,” and trashed it. Three weeks, twice a day is a rich investment. So keep it up, but we can take it offline and we’ll figure it out. And then we’ll share that with a group, your success story or you’ll disappear quietly in the night and I won’t tell anybody what happened.

Martin
No, it’s gotta be a success story. I am totally committed to this. I want to be one of the best cases that you’ve got. I’ve got a history that needs sorting out. I’m confident in the success.

David Poole
We dig it, we dig it. It’s those cases that are more curious to us than anybody. So that’s why when I talked to Blake, I’ll say, “Okay, great. Let me get Martin’s contact information, I’ve got questions.”

Dan Selene
I would say one more thing is that is you just don’t ever give it up. Don’t give up on it, that’s the main thing. And I’m positive it’s going to come through.

Martin
Yeah. Thank you.

David Poole
Got a question from [inaudible 005515], I’m a newbie to NuCalm just about two weeks, [inaudible 005518] if I lose conscious and as to my guess I fall asleep, but I wake up as soon as they hear the track is over. What do you suggest to then get myself out of bed? I get so relaxed and it’s easier to fall back to sleep. I typically do it at 400 or 500 AM.

Dan Selene
400 or 500 AM. And what purpose do you want? You want to-

David Poole
[inaudible 005544].

Kirsten
Hi.

Dan Selene
Hi.

Kirsten
I’ll get a better light, I just got off the bike. So I’m doing it because I’m definitely not getting a lot of sleep at night, maybe five hours of sleep a night. I’m doing it for recovery, so I’ll wake up at like four o’clock in the morning and do 50 minutes. [crosstalk 005609] I have dirty sleep, I think because of bad mattress and whatever and so I’m trying to get myself that extra sleep.

Dan Selene
What time do you actually want to get up then?

Kirsten
500 AM out of bed.

Dan Selene
You get up at 500.

Kirsten
But I’m up at 400 to do the track.

Dan Selene
I see. You do what, the relax or recovery tracks at four o’clock?

Kirsten
I do a deep recovery or something like that.

Dan Selene
And you only have one hour?

Kirsten
Yeah.

Dan Selene
Okay. I was going to say, because otherwise putting that together with the nap is fantastic because the nap brings you up even more at the end. But that’s 70 minutes, if you can do 70 minutes, I would do Deep Recovery into either of the two power naps.

Kirsten
Okay. Yeah. I love the power naps in the afternoon. They’re awesome.

Dan Selene
Do them as well. But you can do the Deep Recovery, it’s 432 and the power nap too is 432. So those two could go nicely together in the morning, and then do the other power nap in the afternoon.

Kirsten
But I don’t understand, how do I program my phone that way to do one and then the other?

Dan Selene
Do you have a iPhone?

Kirsten
Yeah.

Dan Selene
Put it on iTunes, make a playlist. Wait a second, is it iTunes?

David Poole
No. It’s all after it. And so all you’re doing is to select those tracks and they’re playing in a loop.

Kirsten
In a loop. Okay. And I’ll put the timer on 70 minutes.

Dan Selene
70 minutes. Yeah.

Kirsten
Awesome. Thank you. That’s great. Thank you.

David Poole
Question from Philip, my mind does wander almost the whole session. Do you recommend just letting it continue or center it somehow?

Dan Selene
I think try to center it would be feeding into that. I would just let it go and just go with the music. I try to make the music like a journey and so you could let go into that, especially with thinking deep recovery. I wouldn’t try to do anything. I would just let it go if at all possible.

David Poole
Yeah, I agree. I used to go into NuCalm with an intent and sometimes I’d get frustrated I couldn’t accomplish anything. And now it’s just an escape, I just hit the pause button on life and say, “Hey, this moment kind of sucks. Do I have time to do NuCalm?” I go do it. I don’t try and solve the problems I’m having, I don’t anticipate solving the problems. Just go, get away. And I’m going to get back, I’m usually pretty relaxed and it doesn’t seem so overwhelming to me. And my imagination is incredible, I have the craziest dreams on NuCalm, it’s spectacular. My subconscious is very… I don’t know. [inaudible 005904] it’s mine, I can’t compare to somebody else’s but it’s rich with content.

David Poole
Myrna has the question. What does it feel like to be in theta state? I’m on my third week and I’m not sure if entering theta state. I stack a 50 minute and a power nap, first thing in the morning, most days.

Dan Selene
So what was the question, how does it feel to be in the theta state?

David Poole
Yes.

Dan Selene
The theta is the deep recovery state, that’s where… I know that I have almost like a little click that goes in my mind, I can feel it when I go there. Usually you start to breathe slower, that’s one of the first things that happens, at least that’s how I feel. And then that’s kind of where the mind is really slowing down. And actually the first 15 minutes on a lot of the tracks, that’s kind of getting you there and it kinda meets your mind where it is and then it kind of takes you on this journey, deeper, deeper, deeper, but then after about 15 minutes, you’re kind of there in that state. And what does it feel like? It’s the mind is quiet and it just feels like you’re just breathing and you’re just there.

David Poole
Excellent. Anthony has a question, heard you say sometimes you use without the disc. Can you elaborate on with and without?

Dan Selene
Well, that’s only, someone asked about before going to sleep or using it late at night. That’s only for that. It’s not really a NuCalm session without the disk, but if you’re doing something where you don’t want the full session and you just want something like that relaxing in the background, that’s where it could be used without that. Otherwise, you want the disc for the full effect.

David Poole
I see a comment from Kirsten, “It’s definitely like a good joint. LOL.” I can actually expand on that, it’s legal in Massachusetts. It’s okay to talk about this. But here’s something interesting, if you want to get a more profound experience from a substance, you do NuCalm first because you can balance the autonomic nervous system. You’re going to get a greater yield of anything you take, I don’t care if it’s ibuprofen or marijuana. And we work with a lot of our athletes and a lot of them have habits that are off label habits and that’s how I felt and I say, “Listen you don’t have to smoke 10 hits, you can smoke two and get the exact same effect.

David Poole
And by the way, when you mess up your schedule and you’ve got practice and you’re a little bit unwell, do NuCalm again, it will stabilize and bring you back to kind of your full conscious state. So it’s a nice partner in crime, if you will. A question from Myrna or a comment, “I love the rain stick kind of sound, I think it’s in the Deep Recovery track.”

Dan Selene
The rain stick is actually in the power nap two.

David Poole
Excellent. And Roseanne, “I usually do a NuCalm between 200 and 400 PM deep recovery. I’m using it for better sleep. If I can only do it after 500 PM on a day, what track would you recommend?

Dan Selene
If you can only do it after 500 PM?

David Poole
Yeah.

Dan Selene
Perhaps one of the relaxed tracks after 500 PM. Relax one and relax two.

David Poole
Can you speak for a moment, Dan, about the moment you and Jim had around [Maliva 010236]?

Dan Selene
I mean, that he was using it back in the [crosstalk 010243].

David Poole
And you asked him, “Hey Jim, what kind of music do you like?” And he’s like, “Oh, I’ve been using this guitar track for my girls to put them to sleep at night for about 10 years. It’s not Maliva, and your response was?

Dan Selene
Well, that was our record that we put that out in 1990, basically. And so that was one of the connections that we had.

David Poole
That was a really cool moment. Jim, couldn’t wait to hang up and call me and say, “Holy shit.” And find out Maliva, we think we can get the licensing.

Dan Selene
Yeah.

David Poole
Good.

David Poole
That was fantastic. Well, that’s it my friend. It’s time to get back to work. What time is it? It’s 906, that was a good solid hour. I really appreciate you, Dan, as a friend, [inaudible 010328], your drive, [inaudible 010331] your talent, your groundedness is very cool. People are already recognizing that you’re in great shape too.

Dan Selene
Thanks a lot. I really wish the best-

David Poole
[crosstalk 010342] come to your place. I’ll beat you in a pull-up contest next time.

Dan Selene
Yeah. And I just wish the best to everybody on their NuCalm journey, the Mastermind Group. I hope you’re with us for a long time.

David Poole
Cheers everybody. Thank you.

Dan Selene
Thank you.