Not Good Enough is Just the Starting Point with Bob Reitz

Today’s guest on This Is NuCalm has not only served for our country but is also an avid user of NuCalm. Retired Navy SEAL, Bob Reitz joins David Poole in an inspiring and heartfelt discussion of the trials and tribulations behind SEAL training and the truth about dealing with PTSD.

“You may be able to hold your breath for five minutes, but they want to know how you manage and how you act at five minutes and one second. Do you panic? Do you compete? Do you keep your composure? Do you stay underwater and relax even though you’re a quiet storm inside? All those things matter.”

— Bob Reitz

Tune in to hear Reitz’s personal experience of returning to civilian life and how he has made it his mission to help fellow veterans manage their PTSD.

 

Listen to This Is NuCalm on Apple & Spotify!

 

Bob Reitz, retired U.S, Navy SEAL, spent 23 years in the Navy, with the last 16 years as an officer in the SEAL Teams.

 



Key Takeaways

[1:00] David welcomes a long-time friend, Navy SEAL, hero, all-around awesome human and asks him to share the story of how he came to serve.

 

[5:23] The people who make it to SEAL training need to really want to do it — there is a 75% to 85% drop-out rate! Bob shares some of the grueling trials and training required.

 

[8:31] Bob shares some of his deployments, what they have meant, and the fundamental mission difference between pre- and post-9/11.

 

[13:56] Six to seven months of constant sympathetic drive is not something your body or mind is used to recuperating from, but it’s part of the job. Bob shares the hurdles of hypervigilance experience as well as the hardships of managing the need for control post-deployment.

 

[20:13] Bob shares a personal example of how hypervigilance can show up inappropriately — even backyard camping — in a personal and family relationship setting.

 

[22:11] Growing with a tightly knit unit of brothers at arms and developing this uniquely unshakable bond teaches you that life is really about community. Retirement from this context can lead to a profound feeling of loss and Bob shares how some people find relief from this feeling of emptiness.

 

[30:12] PTSD is ugly. And easy to deny. Bob opens up about his Veteran grandfather.

 

[35:55] To put things into perspective, Bob shares what a day in his life is on deployment 24/7 for seven months at a time — from Djibouti to Afghanistan.

 

[40:32] What does Veteran’s day mean to Bob? He also shares advice on how to come back to civilian life.

 

[48:12] From dying on the vine to Bob figuring out the best coping mechanisms for managing his PTSD — including NuCalm.

 

[52:33] Audience questions start with “How do you share this PTSD experience with others?”

 

[58:05] “Have you customized NuCalm for your own optimal experience?”

 

[1:01:52] “TBI and TMJ are causing grinding. Will NuCalm help with this?”

 

[1:07:04] “Bob’s recommendations for getting — and staying — in the zone.”

 

[1:16:30] David thanks Bob for his service, his experience, and for sharing so much of himself.

 

Continue on your journey and until next time, breathe deep, relax, and keep looking forward.

 

Mentioned in this episode

NuCalm

 

More about NuCalm and the podcast

This is NuCalm, the show for those looking to improve sleep quality, manage stress, and boost recovery. Brought to you by Solace Lifesciences, the makers of NuCalm, the world’s only patented and proven neuroscience technology that works within minutes, without drugs, every time! In over one million medical sessions, NuCalm has helped men and women around the world.

 

NuCalm: stress relief for the way we live today, technology to help you disconnect.


Full Transcript

David Poole
I’m really pleased, very honored, and Bob and I have known each other for several years. He’s been with the company now for over a year. Tonight, what I’d like to do is focus not on Bob’s deployments and the action and all the cool things that we want to know from heroes but really on the reality.

David Poole
One of the hard parts for Bob and we’ll talk about how he got involved with NuCalm, is assimilating back into civilian life and playing that game, especially when you’re trained to do something completely different and you’re equipped to do something different and you’re conditioned over time and you change without even knowing it, and then to get back in and go grocery shopping and take care of the kids, make sure the dishes are done, the laundry is done, and things that we think are important, not necessarily mission critical, become challenging for people like Bob who are not control freaks. They’re conditioned to being in control. Bob is very personal, very private. I’m sure we’ll have questions that he would like to maintain that privacy and we’ll just ask him to say pass.

David Poole
With that, Bob, if you wouldn’t mind, I like to start these conversations by share with us your life journey from the earliest memory to how you became interested in serving and what that was like.

Bob Reitz
I grew up in Southern California. I was an athlete. I played sports my whole life. Went to high school, played football, track, the whole deal. Normal childhood. Spent my time at the beach in Newport Beach and enjoyed my life there.

Bob Reitz
What really focused me in on moving towards the military was my oldest brother Tony, who had a dream to fly jets and never realized it. When I was 20, I was stuck in a job, it was a good job, and they wanted to bring me in. It was at that point I decided I was going to make a change. I joined the Navy and with some goal of getting commissioned and becoming a pilot, of all things, I thought that’s what I wanted to do. Top Gun had just come out and it looked sexy. Then I learned what pilots did and it wasn’t as sexy as it sounded. In fact, the flying got in the way of the day job from what I understand.

Bob Reitz
There was not much in the media or just out there about Seals. It was very quiet. There were never any movies, there were never any discussions. The closest I knew about Seals, the closest thing that I ever heard was one of my best friends had a neighbor who went to Bud’s and he was in training and that was the end of it.

Bob Reitz
It wasn’t until I joined the Navy and was working overseas, I was fixing submarines at the time in the Navy and Seals came off the boat. I was miserable, I didn’t like my job, I got suckered into it, and saw those guys and they seemed like me.

Bob Reitz
I wanted to learn about it. I did. I figured it out. I got a scholarship to college and got a degree and started my path on becoming a Seal. Come to find out, they wanted you to get good grades, they wanted you to be an athlete, they wanted you to be well rounded and be able to make good decisions.

Bob Reitz
At the end of the day, I ended up getting selected, which was a scary thought because you fight, fight, fight to get there and then all of a sudden you’re going and you realize, “I’m going. I have to go to Bud’s and get through this training.”

Bob Reitz
I was lucky enough to get selected and ended up going to training in 1996. It wasn’t perfect for me. A lot of guys get through in six months. I got pneumonia and my lungs bled. I went to the hospital and ended up six days in the hospital and healing and rolled to the next class and ended up on an 11 month journey to get through Bud’s. Then following Bud’s, we ended up going to advanced training, getting through that, going to a Seal team and starting the job.

Bob Reitz
That’s how I got there. I don’t know if you want me to keep going but that’s essentially how I got to the Seal teams and started the journey and got welcomed into the brotherhood of this great community of the Seals.

David Poole
Excellent. That’s a great start. A couple of questions. How many people get invited and how many people make it through generally?

Bob Reitz
It’s not so much that you get invited. We don’t invite anybody. What we’re looking for is the volunteer, we’re looking for somebody who wants to actually do it and has given it thought. There are no invitations. What it is is people apply, they want to come, and, for instance, my class started with 225 people. We graduated 38. On average, that’s the case. It’s about an 75%, 85% drop rate depending. We’ve had whole classes not make it through training. I think there’s one that didn’t make it through training.

Bob Reitz
For the most part, it usually is about 38 guys, 38 to 40 guys no matter what. They’ve done a lot of research on figuring out how to get people through. It’s difficult to pin a finger on it. You might look at the class and think that you’re going to pick guys and that guy will make it, that guy will make it, that guy will make it and you will be wrong every single time. You never know because it’s personal.

David Poole
Can you share with us some of the tests, some of the trials, a little bit of flavor for the Bud’s training?

Bob Reitz
Sure. We talked about this a little bit, Amy, you and I, we talked about … A lot of people think that Seals are these great big, strong guys that can do anything and often times, those are the first guys that quit. Often times it’s because they’ve never been challenged. They’ve never been in a place where they’ve failed. Everything about Seal training is failure. Failure every single day, not measuring up, not being able to satisfy one single instructor. I don’t care if you run a three minute mile, they’ll tell you, “That’s great. I hope you beat it tomorrow.” That’s how training is because that’s what we’re looking for.

Bob Reitz
We talked a little bit about the underwater drills and being a Seal is being comfortable in the water. I told you guys about knot tying and holding your breath and Amy asked me … I see you, Amy, you’re on my page. “How long can you hold your breath?” It doesn’t matter. I was surprised [inaudible 000712] does not matter because in Seal training what they care about is you may be able to hold your breath for five minutes but they want to know how long and how you manage and how you act at five minutes and one second. Do you panic? Do you compete? Do you keep your composure? Do you stay in the water and relax even though you’re a quiet storm inside? All those things matter.

Bob Reitz
That’s really what we care about, we care about how you respond when you’re at failure, when you have reached your limit, and that’s really what we look for in training, as we talked about.

David Poole
That’s scary. We already know that you’re calm under pressure.

Bob Reitz
You heard me yell today.

David Poole
That’s easy. Can you talk a little bit about some of your deployments and what it meant to you?

Bob Reitz
Sure. I come from a … There’s some guys that have come into the Seal teams that have only known war. I entered the Seal teams in 1996 and we weren’t at war. There’s a pre-war and post … Pre-9/11 and post-9/11 deployment. Some of the guys that came in post-9/11 don’t understand and don’t … There was a different mission at the time. It was a foreign internal defense, it was a mission of training other nations, making friends with other nations with the thought of down the road if we ever need to springboard from that nation, we have friends in the neighborhood.

Bob Reitz
There’s pre and post. The pre-9/11 deployments were mostly really just a good deal for the most part. You get to go to a lot of different places. You, essentially, see the world in the Navy. Post-9/11 is different. They’re very long grinds. They can be anywhere between six to 15 months, depending on where you are and who you’re deployed with.

Bob Reitz
For me, personally, pre-9/11, I went all over the world and saw great places, typical Navy career. Post-9/11, you go to not so savory places. Post-9/11, went to Djibouti, Africa, and worked there in a place where we were pretty much the second platoon in country. There was one platoon before us from Seal Team 3, a good friend of mine, classmate managed to go there just before we did but we were tasked with setting up. It turned out we went into Djibouti, Africa to do some training. We were going to shoot [inaudible 001010], communicate, do all the fun stuff and then we stayed and it was difficult. It was a difficult deployment because all my guys wanted to get into Afghanistan. They wanted to go into the fight but we couldn’t. We had to stay where we were.

Bob Reitz
The thing that we talked about earlier was we knew there were terrorists in town, we were deployed right about halftime in the setup to get into Iraq, and so what essentially happened was we trained, trained, trained, we’re supposed to move into Afghanistan but we didn’t. There were terrorists in town from Al Qaeda networks. We knew where they were, we knew that they were surveilling us. We were aware of them but we weren’t allowed to go get them.

Bob Reitz
Part of the conversation of tonight is discussing how I get to where I am personally today from those encounters and those encounters, what they do to you is when you’re in a place like Africa, in Djibouti, for instance, the people are very much peaceful. They’re a nomadic people but they are not our enemies. They’re are enemies in town. The problem is you can’t tell who is who.

Bob Reitz
That really was the impetus for us to constantly stay vigilant. Whenever my guys … We always had to go out in town where literally there was 15 of us … Well, 22 in my platoon and a couple that were in the embassy that were doing comms and we had to live and move amongst the people. If you could imagine, a Seal platoon is 22 guys that look like they’re on a football team and we’re very easy to identify and the bad guys know who we are, they know where we are, they know what we look like. We stand out. We are easy targets.

Bob Reitz
It wasn’t until one of my guys, one of my leadership guys came to me and asked me to write a paper, a letter for him to the VA kind of explaining our situation in Africa. He was my number one guy, he was the guy who ran my boys, he was my LP, what we call a leading petty officer. He was a good, good friend. I’ve known him since the early days of training.

Bob Reitz
He was working with the VA to get the full diagnosis for PTSD. Really, at the end of the day, what we were dealing with was an unknown enemy. We didn’t know who was bad. We didn’t know who was good. We didn’t know if we were going to get shot that day, we were getting blown up that day, we didn’t know anything and what that does to you, at least in that situation, is it puts you on hyper alert. You’re on hyper alert for seven straight months in country.

Bob Reitz
That was that deployment. We went from Djibouti, Africa to the Philippines. The Philippines is a similar country. There are bad guys there. There are assassins. They will shoot you. They have different motives but we’re not allowed to go get them. It makes things difficult. It’s those encounters … I did Djibouti, Philippines, Afghanistan, and all the fun places. It’s not the good places in Philippines. It’s the Muslim [inaudible 001343] where all the fighting happens and occurs.

Bob Reitz
That’s kind of the gist of it. For the bad places.

David Poole
Bob, can you talk a little bit about your personal life pre-deployment? This is one of the things that I think is really important for people to understand is you’re a normal guy, you’re trained to do a job, you want to do a job, you’re willing to serve, you get deployed. You don’t get to choose your deployment. Like you just said, six to seven months of constant sympathetic drive … Not paranoia but paying attention all the time. Then you come home, greet your family, and then what happens?

Bob Reitz
Yeah. Dysfunction. Dysfunction happens. What ends up happening for the guys, and this is anybody, this isn’t just a Seal team. This is everybody in the military, especially folks that are deployed. Everybody is different. We on the teams, we get a lot more training. We’re expected to do a lot more hard stuff and we’re expected to endure a lot more hard stuff.

Bob Reitz
What ends up happening is you’re hyper-vigilant. My guy, who I was just telling you about, Africa, going out, he’s got to go out in town, [inaudible 001502] lots of people, we eat amongst the people because we don’t want to eat MREs every day for 300 straight days. We want to eat food. We risk mad cow. We don’t care. We will eat a steak in town because it’s a steak and it’s not a meal ready to go in a bag.

Bob Reitz
There’s tasks to do, there’s things to do, there’s the embassy to go visit to talk to the ambassador. There’s things that have to be done. That requires us to be in town and to be in town is to not know, to be in town with people that may be terrorists or may not be terrorists is to be hyper-vigilant.

Bob Reitz
That’s the dysfunction. Dysfunction that we deal with is hyper-vigilance. We end up constantly … We always say keep your head on swivel. The guys, they go out, they’re constantly vigilant, they’re always carrying weapons, they’re ready to go at a moment’s notice.

Bob Reitz
Then you come home and when you come home, you come home to a family, if you’re married, and to a wife that is, well, one, managing everything and handling it. You have to, one, be quiet, keep your mouth shut, don’t make any big changes. I got this advice from a Seal chief, which is one of our senior [inaudible 001625], don’t leave a trace when you come home because your wife will have it handled. You don’t want to come home and make big changes or you’ll be out the door again.

Bob Reitz
What ends up happening is you come home and you try to do normal life and what ends up being the case is that you’re hyper-vigilant. You’re hyper-vigilant with children. You’re hyper-vigilant with your family. You’re hyper-vigilant where you go but you don’t need to be but you don’t really have a way to control it or stop it.

Bob Reitz
I talk to a lot of guys about this, that we deal with, and what it transforms into is lack of sleep, trying to control situations. We talked a little bit about this, controlling your surroundings. When you’re in Africa or you’re in Afghanistan or you’re in Philippines or Mexico City, for me, when I traveled there, there’s bad guys all around you, you know they’re watching you, and you can’t do anything about it. You can’t control the situation.

Bob Reitz
When you’re home, you feel less control. You want to control everything. You, I’m sure, can figure out how that goes over. Not very good. Hence, the dysfunction.

David Poole
Give us examples. Today we talked about … When you talked about [inaudible 001750] patrol, what happens in my room, what happens in my kitchen, what happens in my yard, what happens in my garage, what happens in my car, and that becomes your domain and it becomes almost your new obsession.

Bob Reitz
You know, I think the best thing for people to understand is that because we come from a point of no control, you never know what’s going to happen, you never know who is good, who is bad. You never know if the flight you’re on is going to get shot. You never know if you’re going to crash. You never know if you’re going to end up in a bad situation.

Bob Reitz
You try to control everything. For me, it’s always been … It’s an interesting thing because I think about it a lot, having just got divorced in April, again, which is a really significant thing in the Seal teams. We just eat marriages alive, either because of deployments and time away or just the way we act when we come home.

Bob Reitz
It’s about control. For me, you can get paralyzed in doing something. For instance, I’m supposed to make sales. You called me today, “I make sales.” You know, for a guy that’s been through what we’ve been through, that doesn’t have control, will … I’ll look around and, to me, the dishes are in the sink, I’m like, “I got to get those dishes. I got to get the dishes clean. Then I got to clean the house.” Everything is in place and then once it’s in its place, then I can sit down and I feel good because we’re trying to create a safe place for control where we’ve lived in a place for years while on deployment where we don’t have control.

Bob Reitz
That’s really the significant thing and that creates dysfunction in the home when you have a wife that isn’t worried about the dishes and she’s not worried about stuff being thrown around the house. She’s worried about happy children. She’s worried about good encounters and experiences. Where you come home and you’re worried about, “Why aren’t the dishes put away? Why isn’t the house clean?” That creates dysfunction and it creates distress in relationships.

Bob Reitz
If you don’t recognize that, before you know it, you’ll have torn through another one and another one and another one. That’s kind of the difficulties of coming home. I’ll give you an example. I told you this today but I’ll share it.

Bob Reitz
It’s the hyper-vigilance. For us to sleep, to protect the family, we go from being with our platoon mates, who we love and revere and would fight to the death for, to coming home back to our family and it translates and the next thing you know, you’re looking to care for your family and protect your family and that hyper-vigilance gets shifted to a new target.

Bob Reitz
I gave you an example of being in the backyard. My wife and children wanted to camp in the backyard and what do I do? We get the tent setup, we get everything setup, and I live in Colorado and we have bears and we have lions and we have raccoons and bad things that come and will eat you. What do I say to them? Just before we lay down, I say, “Hey, listen, quick brief, when the bear comes, if it comes, I need you guys over here because I’m going to shoot the bear from here.” I’m already going through contingencies of how to handle situations because that’s what we’re taught. We’re taught to go through contingencies. On any mission, on any target, on anything. My wife looks at me like, “Are you crazy?” My children don’t want to camp anymore and I create issues. That’s the kind of thing that gets in the way of normalcy. Yeah.

David Poole
Well, here’s the crazy thing, Bob, that’s perfectly normal for you. [inaudible 002204] really uncomfortable if you didn’t do a quick brief and everybody knew the exit plan if something bad goes down, right?

Bob Reitz
That’s what we do. Yeah.

David Poole
I appreciate you sharing that. I totally understand. With the kids, especially, I’ve got two sons, one of the things that really used to drive me crazy, my older son used to get bullied. There’s not a lot you can do and all I wanted to do was snap necks.

Bob Reitz
Yes.

David Poole
A trail of blood and I’ll solve the problem, it’s real easy, it’ll take me about 30 seconds.

Bob Reitz
Yes.

David Poole
Can you talk for a moment … You mentioned about your brothers in arms and serving with them and we would die for them. Can you talk about giving that up when you come back? No one can relate to the intensity of the experiences you have and then all of a sudden they’re gone and you’re just alone with your crazy thoughts trying to take care of people who don’t recognize you anymore.

Bob Reitz
That’s a really good point. I had a conversation with a customer this afternoon. She is a very Type A athlete and she got a little anxiety when COVID happened. We recognized today during our conversation that we had similarities. I’ll explain those to you.

Bob Reitz
One thing you find out … You never really know what you’re going to get when you become a Seal. You don’t know because it wasn’t a lot out there when I became a Seal. It’s an evolution of learning literally every day, especially … No matter what level you’re at on Seal teams, in that kind of organization, you’re constantly learning. You are responsible and accountable to everyone, even the lowest ranking guy, you’re accountable to each other.

Bob Reitz
What that really is is when you become a Seal, you think one thing, you think, “I’m going to be a Navy Seal. I get this trident and this team and we’re going to go get bad guys.” Then what you learn each day and more and more is that it’s really not about that. It’s about the community. What makes the Seal team so strong is really the community. It’s that brotherhood. It’s those guys that you would lay down and die for, that you would fight to the bitter end for each person next to you and they would do the same for you in a heartbeat.

Bob Reitz
That’s what makes the Seal teams so strong. That’s what makes us such a formidable enemy to the bad guys. What ends up happening is you learn along the way that it really is truly about our community. It’s about the people that we get to be with every single day. It’s about being surrounded by literally the top 1% of overachievers every single moment of your life.

Bob Reitz
As an officer on the Seal teams, which was a full-blown privilege and an honor … I always say I served these guys. You get to know each person, each Seal, each person in your platoon, in your care, in your command, whatever it is, however you’re connected to them, it’s this brotherhood of connection and family that you would literally fight to the death for and they would for you.

Bob Reitz
Fast-forward to retirement and leaving these Seal teams and leaving the Navy … I would argue that this is the same for most everybody in the military. We talked a little bit about your son, Dave, the Marine Corps has no less connection, no less commitment, no less brotherhood. It’s the same. It’s the same in the military. Because we go in harm’s way, I think that there’s a bond that happens with people that is unique and it’s powerful and it’s strong.

Bob Reitz
What happens to us when we leave is we’re lost. I moved to Colorado Springs to do a joint tour and end up retiring out of Colorado Springs. There are very few Seals in Colorado Springs. San Diego and Norfolk, Virginia is where we have our bases and we have our really big concentration of Seals.

Bob Reitz
What ends up happening is you lose sight, you lose connection with the brotherhood, and as soon as you get out, you feel this loss. You feel … I’ll just say from my perspective, there’s an emptiness because on a daily basis on the Seal teams, every day we’d wake up, we’d have officers call, we’d go see the guys, we do a great workout together, it’s all competition, everybody fights to win, and then we go about our job and work with each other and go home and come back and do it again. Five days a week. When we’re on deployment, we do it just about every day.

Bob Reitz
You lose that connection and when you lose that connection, it’s almost like, although, you’re still in the brotherhood, you lose connection to the brotherhood. Guys can get depressed. You feel a little lost. You go to work for companies … Like I said, I worked for the Covert Audio and Video Companies and DOD, they’re contracting military contracting companies, for about seven years before I realized how miserable I was and wanted to quit.

Bob Reitz
You find very few people in those communities that are like-minded where in Seal teams, it’s not every person for themselves. It’s how do I help the team? How do we get stronger? How do we get faster? How are we better? How do we kill more bad guys? That kind of thing is what matters. In the corporate world, it’s a little different.

Bob Reitz
What you find is this loss of the brotherhood, you’ve lost that connection. There is no working out. There is no camaraderie. There is no full-blown competition every single day. It’s actually completely different. That creates depression and it creates a loss and it’s difficult to find a replacement for that. Some guys can find it I think if they do particular sports, if they’re in combat sports like Jiu Jitsu. We have a lot of guys that are in Jiu Jitsu and some of my fondest memories are rolling as a novice with some of our really talented Jiu Jitsu guys. I don’t know [inaudible 002911], great guy, one of my platoon mates, and he and another guy in my platoon would school us in Jiu Jitsu. As you know, Dave, you were a wrestler, it’s a whole different level when you’re dealing with an expert.

Bob Reitz
Those guys that find those communities that have that bond of competition and rigor I think excel and continue to excel but if you don’t have that, like most of our guys getting out of the military, then they suffer. They deal with depression and they deal with trying to control things and things like that.

Bob Reitz
That’s some of the challenges of coming back into civilian world, especially after you get out of the military when you’ve been in this community for so long. It really is a community.

David Poole
Bob, one of the saddest things or ironies is they’re trained to be so tough, they’re taught to be tough, they don’t ask for help. I can tell you from the year we’ve had together, you’re still very much in the brotherhood. You call me all the time and say, “Hey, my buddy, this guy, that guy, he needs help.”

Bob Reitz
Yeah.

David Poole
[inaudible 003022] all these guys. They do need help. I already knew going in they need help [inaudible 003031] holy shit, this guy is in a really bad place. Wow. All they did was serve. All they did was sacrifice. All they did was give up everything they had so we could be safe. It’s tragic in that regard. How do you reach out to people and let them know it’s okay? If they don’t get help, they’re going to be in a purgatory of suffering and hell and isolation and depression.

Bob Reitz
Well, that’s the issue, right? For me, two marriages down and, for me, it’s an interesting thing because I would argue anybody in the soft community, whether you’re Special Force, Navy Seal, PJ, combat controller, we’re all taught a certain way of being strong, being tough. Little things can’t bother you.

Bob Reitz
I retired in 2012. Without getting personal, still communicating and talking with my now-ex-wife, she still remembers to the day, “Well, heck no, I don’t have PTSD. I’m fine. I’m fine.” I never crashed. The [inaudible 003148] never really crashed. It landed hard. We thought we were going to crash but we didn’t crash. The plane never crashed. We never got blown up. Nobody got shot next to me. Nobody got their head blown off.

Bob Reitz
For me, I didn’t believe that I deserved even the conversation of PTSD. I think a lot of guys go through life and it manifests and it shows its place. It shows its ugly face and in your life, but coming from our community, we come from a place that is, “Hey, we’re strong. We’re tough. We’re not supposed to have those feelings. We’re not supposed to show weakness. We’re not supposed to have weakness.”

Bob Reitz
What ends up happening is the dysfunction gets bigger and bigger and bigger. Then you end up having to have a come to Jesus moment that, “Hey, maybe there is something going on. Maybe all that control, maybe it’s not just personally who I am that I need things in their place. Maybe it’s a different thing.”

Bob Reitz
With the guys, often times we don’t know why we’re doing what we’re doing. I don’t know if I told you this but my grandpa was in World War Two. Both my dad’s parents were Marines. Mom and Dad. Poor guy. All I knew of my grandpa was that he was a Marine and he drank a lot and he was hard on my dad and his siblings.

Bob Reitz
It wasn’t until my dad’s sister and he showed me … My aunts gave me all of the memorabilia that my grandmother had put together for my grandpa. He’s a World War Two vet and did the island campaign. To bring this home, he was very hard on my dad, he’s a very hard drunk, mean, nasty drunk. It wasn’t until I read those papers, those things that my grandma had put together, the first Purple Heart, shot on the island campaign in the Marshall Islands, then the second Purple Heart, getting blown up and in a place where it was a whole different kind of warfare. It was a warfare of fixing bayonets and up close and personal and the Japanese were no … They were a difficult and very motivated enemy at the time.

Bob Reitz
I told my dad and his sister, my aunt, I said, “I hope this helps you but Grandpa he had PTSD.” Back in those days, we didn’t recognize it, we didn’t talk about it. They literally went and did their job overseas, they came home, and they were told to go back to work and function. Then you see the dysfunction that happens that came from that for our Baby Boomer generation.

Bob Reitz
I told them, I said, “You know, I kid you not, he got blown up, he got shot, he went right back after he healed both times. There was no break. There was no, ‘Thank you for passing GO.’ It was back to the war effort until its over. Then these people were told to come home and function.”

Bob Reitz
For our guys, even our infantry, our guys that walk through town, they see things, they still deal with their trauma, and then they come home and they think they’re supposed to be okay and then they’re not. Then we deal with the 22 guys a day committing suicide because they don’t know how to function within a society again and they haven’t been brought back and they haven’t dealt with the issues that they’ve created overseas, which is no easy task.

Bob Reitz
That’s where you mentioned … I had a great conversation with a gentleman today. He’s a NuCalm user, his wife is a NuCalm user, but he has a family full of veterans and way back to I think even he said World War One. He did not serve but what he does is he takes care of veterans. He cooks meals for veterans. He does his part. He recognizes what they’ve done where others do not.

Bob Reitz
The difficulty, obviously, is coming back and being normal and recognizing where you don’t recognize where you feel like you don’t deserve … I didn’t feel like I deserved PTSD until finally after this divorce and I had to look at … You point a finger, you got three fingers pointing back at you. You got to do some self-reflection and see is the problem with me? I do take some of those responsibility.

David Poole
Bob, if I may share, when we had a conversation a few months ago … You’ve been blessed with an advocate at the VA who has been a very good companion for you, a very good champion, and is doing great work. She helped you come to that resolution. You said, “Yeah, well, she reminded me of that when she read my report …” You started listing off experiences.

Bob Reitz
[crosstalk 003704].

David Poole
I’m listening and I’m like, “Dude, none of that is normal.” One of those could cause PTSD. You listed 10 and we just started the conversation. You’ve had to suppress and you didn’t think about it until you said, “Oh, yeah. When I was on this deployment, here’s how I need to behave, here’s how my training was” and you just do it, that’s your job.

David Poole
I think it’ll help people too to understand a day in the life of a deployment. [inaudible 003732] spent seven months being constantly vigilant. When do you wake up? When do you get briefed? When do you go do your mission? When do you come back? It’s seven days a week, seven months at a time. I don’t think people understand the intensity.

Bob Reitz
It depends where you are. In Africa, it was different. There’s a massive base in Africa in Djibouti now. When we got there, we stayed at a demining camp. I’m talking about a French demining camp from past wars, past things, where the French Foreign Legion … It’s kind of like the French’s last bastion of hope but the French Foreign Legion were still in Djibouti, Africa, which is a whole other problem for my guys.

Bob Reitz
We deployed to Qatar, to the country Qatar, and then went down to … We were on a split deployment with some Special Forces guys. We were going to rotate through Yemen. That was the plan. We setup a trip to go down to Djibouti, Africa because it’s close. It’s close to that theater, it’s close to Yemen. We were going to train. We hadn’t shot. We wanted to get out and do some shooting and get the guys back on the gun.

Bob Reitz
Well, that turned into a straight seven month deployment and we never left. What ended up happening was there was a large buildup and there was a large … Kind of like I told you, I said there we were deployed during the summer. It was kind of like halftime. 9/11 happened, Afghanistan happened, we deployed in April, April to October, very hot times and for whatever reason, we’re smart, we’re not going to go into Iraq in the dead of summer. We’re going to spare the guys that and plus we got to do some planning.

Bob Reitz
Our deployment was spent training, constantly training. We shot millions of bullets. We trained constantly. We did [inaudible 003940] action drills. We built the base for other forces to come and that was a whole goal and, like I said, we were the first guys there. We were never off. The guys were constantly working, staying strong, we were constantly shooting, moving, communicating, doing things that we’re supposed to do, and then before you know it …

Bob Reitz
During that deployment was a difficult time, it was a frustrating time because we were a very good and solid platoon of Seals ready to go do our job. You’re a fireman, you want to go put out the fire. What ended up happening was decided at a much higher level than us, that due to relationships with the locals, they decided to keep us there and … That particular year was an interesting year. I don’t know if you remember but they put … It was that year that Yasser Arafat was jammed up in his house by the Israelis in his palace and that turned the Muslim world completely upside down. Everything that was supposed to happen for us did not happen because our partners could not be trusted.

Bob Reitz
We didn’t know if we flew across the pond over to the next country to get the bad guy, whether or not we would be shot at the border. Much of that got shut down, which created a lot of frustration so we just kept working, shooting, moving, communicating, waiting for something to happen. It grinds on you. It grinds on the guys. It grinds on … They want to go do their job, you want to go do your job, and it can’t happen. Then there’s guys in country that you want to go get and you can’t because they don’t want to create any unnecessary blips on the radar at the moment. That’s kind of how that deployment went.

Bob Reitz
Afghanistan is a completely different story. Afghanistan was kind of a turn and burn. I was [inaudible 004143] operations position so I was doing a lot of integrating and deconfliction to make sure everybody was safe. It was a different level of deployment. Lots of bad guys were gotten. There’s a lot of pressure on you because people are counting on you to do your job and to prevent things, good guys shooting good guys, and it takes a lot of communication, a lot of vigilance to make sure that that doesn’t happen. Kind of the gist of it.

David Poole
We wanted to do this yesterday but we’ve got our own control issues and we do this every Thursday night but can you talk a little bit about what Veteran’s Day means to you personally?

Bob Reitz
I think Veteran’s Day, I would argue to most guys that were in the military, we think about the guys we’ve lost. Memorial Day is that day but Veteran’s Day is lots of people telling you thank you, thank you for your service. We appreciate that very much.

Bob Reitz
At the end of the day, I think I would argue that most every person in the military loves their job. We love what we do. We feel it’s patriotic, it feels good, it’s hard, it’s a good hard job that you feel like you’re making a difference.

Bob Reitz
Veteran’s Day, to me, is more so remembering my friends, the guys that have given the ultimate sacrifice. I think for most guys in the military, Veteran’s Day and Memorial Day are the same thing. You remember the guys you lost, you remember your best friends, you remember them visiting you in hospital and now they’re dead. That’s the reality of it.

Bob Reitz
We love what we do. We love this job. We love … I miss it. I know you know that. I miss working, I miss being in Seal teams. You make your decisions … I got out because of my family, my little boy and my little girl that was just born. Now she’s eight. Good decision. It was the right decision. That doesn’t mean that you don’t miss every day being with the boys and being in that situation. You wish that you could have it both ways but you can’t. You’re going to miss that family time.

Bob Reitz
Veteran’s Day makes you remember. It makes you think about guys that are across the world and doing the job and that have the watch because you don’t have it anymore. That’s Veteran’s Day.

David Poole
Appreciate that. It’s an important day. Bob, we’ll shift after this but when you think about, say, Austin joined the service and maybe he sees combat and maybe he doesn’t, how would you counsel him and advise him on coming back into civilian life? This could be true for any moms and dads on the phone tonight or spouses. It’d be nice to have a roadmap to say, “Hey, here’s what you’re going to find, here’s what you’re going to see, here’s where you’re going to struggle and here’s where you need to ask for help.”

Bob Reitz
Good question. Everybody’s experience is different. I think I’ve told you a little bit about … I have good friends here in Colorado Springs. There’s a Special Forces group right around the corner from me, about three, four miles away. One of my best friends here is a warrant officer in the Special Forces and I’ve got another major who was in the Special Forces and then the warrant officer is still in.

Bob Reitz
He’s a NuCalm user as well. You know him. You know who this person is. Everybody’s experience is different. For a Special Forces soldier who has seen a lot of damage and action and things like that, they come back and they can’t find normalcy. They can’t find … They don’t feel right. For this guy, for instance, he’s dealing with these emotions that he’s lived and he turns to alcohol because alcohol takes the edge off of the stress and the experience. All he wants to do is get back in country and put on body armor and have a gun and feel normal. That’s normal for him.

Bob Reitz
Really, I think for us … I talk to a lot of guys, some of my really close friends, that I served with, and we all have issues sleeping, we all have issues … Not all of us but most of us have issues with sleeping, some with anger, some with anxiety, and it’s important to recognize it.

Bob Reitz
My view of PTSD while I was in the Seal Teams, completely different from what it is today. My neuroses has to do with control and controlling my surroundings, controlling everything around me because when I feel like things are getting a little bit out of control, I want to put everything into place, feel safe, feel normal and then go back to what I was doing.

Bob Reitz
You have to recognize those things in you, whatever they are. If you’re abusing alcohol, if you’re drinking alcohol, you got to recognize that, that you’re trying to numb that feeling. If you are yelling at your wife because she’s not doing the dishes then that’s a problem too. It’s just a matter of recognizing why you’re doing what you’re doing and understanding that it’s normal. For us, it’s normal. For a lot of guys that I’ve talked to, they’re having a hard time sleeping.

Bob Reitz
I think I told you the other day that I was in the grocery store and two shady dudes walked by and it literally stood my hair on end and I left because I didn’t have a gun, I didn’t feel safe, I just wanted to get out of there. Going to the store on another occasion, a big tanker truck rode by me and I wanted to … I couldn’t, obviously, go through the red light but it wasn’t lost on me that a tanker truck could blow up at any moment. It’s getting those moments of what you’re used to overseas to not equal the same thing here at home because they don’t.

Bob Reitz
A lot of guys that come home from patrolling every day around people that they don’t know whether they’re good or bad is hard to turn that off. It’s important … I think as family members, which I know that I told my wife, I said, “I don’t have PTSD. I’m good to go” and so she took me for my word. The first interview I had with a VA counselor talking about PTSD who asked me how my deployments went, I said, “Not that bad.”

Bob Reitz
Not that bad is very relative depending on who you’re talking to and who did the deployment and where you went and what you did in the military. Not that bad to me might be terrifying to somebody else. But it wasn’t that bad because in my view, everybody came home, they had fingers and toes, they had eyes, they had ears, nobody got blown up and the plane didn’t crash so we were good. That was a good deployment. Everybody came home. It’s like a good landing. Any landing is a good landing.

Bob Reitz
But those things don’t equal the same thing. What I would argue and what I would tell you is that if dysfunction shows its head there may be an issue and it will be worth looking at because it’s going to be different for everybody. A lot of folks turn to alcohol and/or some type of let’s call it a thing that can help them deal with the intensity of what they’re feeling. They want to numb it and they want to turn off that feeling.

Bob Reitz
What I would say is be aware and be vigilant of that. If you’re a caregiver, if you’re a parent, if you’re a wife, recognize it and have sympathy and empathy for it and understand that it’s not something that the person may not even realize why they’re doing it. They’re just doing it because they need to.

David Poole
Bob, if I may ask a personal question, now that you know and understand and respect the diagnosis, what do you think about? What are the coping things you’ve developed to understand, “Hey, I need to snap out of this”? Do you go for a walk? Do you breathing exercises? Do you take a cold shower? Do you do the dishes?

Bob Reitz
Deep breaths.

David Poole
[crosstalk 005054] paper plates and plastic forks.

Bob Reitz
Are you asking me how I don’t kill my 14 year old. Deep breaths. I think, obviously, I work for NuCalm. I was blessed by Dr. Walters, David Walters, one of our guys. We talked about this a little bit. Dave recognized in me … He recognized that I was dying on the vine and Dave came to you long before me. He’s been my doctor since just before retiring out of the Navy. I’m a NuCalm believer. Dave introduced me to NuCalm, introduced me to you.

Bob Reitz
He’s a mentor of mine. He’s a good friend of mine. I care about him very much. He, as you know, gifted me a system about two years ago. I started NuCalm and, as we talked about today, I wasn’t quite sure of the technology, the whole deal had to do more with I was traveling 100,000 miles a year doing this other job.

Bob Reitz
At the end of the day, he ended up calling me down and telling me, “Hey, I need you to do something for me. I need you to tell me how this works for you. Could you please just let me know how it helps you with dealing with the timezones and traveling and all that business?” It changed my life.

Bob Reitz
It’s been a long drive. It’s been a long journey for me figuring out, again, that I have PTSD. I only got diagnosed this year. I thought I was fine. But coping, obviously, exercise and I sit down a lot when I’m angry and when I’m upset. I sit down because I get out of that mode of where I could go and especially with my son. He pushes my every button, as he should. He’s 14. He’s going on 15. For him, he’s going to push every boundary known to man and let me know that it’s okay.

Bob Reitz
For fear of treating him like a team guy, treating him like he’s a Seal, I need to make sure I don’t do that. Often times now, I just sit down. I say, “Son, let’s sit down and talk.” It takes the edge off. Take a deep breath. I’ve been NuCalming quite a bit.

Bob Reitz
The other thing that I did that helped, Dave, is I changed my job. It sounds gratuitous and kind of funny. I was miserable with my last job, which is why I called you. I didn’t call to work for you in a sense. At first, I called you to have you send me systems so that I could send them to people I really cared about.

Bob Reitz
One of those jerks is on the line here. He texted me just before to give me shit, to let me know that he was on, [Casey Tarabolini 005403]. I’m going to say your name. Anyway, he’s a very dear friend of mine and I wanted him to use it, specifically.

Bob Reitz
That’s why I called you. It blossomed into something that was much better and more important, which is bringing me to where I am today. It was, obviously, Dr. Walters who said, “Here, you should try this” and I did and I remember driving home that day not giving a shit about anything. I didn’t care if people passed me, I didn’t care if people cut me off. I just was in this really calm, quiet space and then became a believer.

Bob Reitz
A few things changed in my life. I changed my job. I do more NuCalm. I take deep breaths. I try to sit down before I get angry. That usually helps the situation.

David Poole
When we’re arguing and you sit down, I need to leave the room really quickly.

Bob Reitz
Yes. Definitely.

David Poole
Understood. All right, my friend. Hey, that was amazing. Really appreciate you sharing your insights, your personal stories, and I’d like to open up for questions. Erica will moderate. I know Cheryl had a question. You can go off mute, Cheryl.

Cheryl
I did. Actually, he answered it in his own way. Thank you very much, Bob, for this special time and your service. It’s heartfelt and personally and professionally. [inaudible 005544] therapist and I work, as we say, the issues are in the tissues and have done some intensives with veterans using cranial psychotherapy. I haven’t had the fortunate use … I’ve incorporated NuCalm in my practice. The question that I had, because I put both of them together, and that’s pretty profound as well. David can probably speak on that.

Cheryl
My question is how do you share this with your fellow men?

Bob Reitz
I’ll tell you. One person at a time. I have a very … Part of the isolation here in Colorado Springs, there’s no ocean, there are no Seals. There are now. We’ve got more Seals in town. A dear friend of mine … It’s interesting. I was literally going to my VA appeal appointment to reassess whether I did or did not have PTSD. I called my friend who was a master chief, which is the really senior enlisted Seal who has done about a bazillion more deployments than I have, dealt with more stuff. Our enlisted guys really do carry the weight.

Bob Reitz
I called him to just check. I had a question for another friend I was working with. I said, “Hey, how are you doing?” He’s like, “Well, I’m living in the basement. My wife’s about done with me. I can’t handle the noise. I can’t handle the extra noise. It’s too intense.” I told him, I said, “Okay, I’m going to my appointment. I’ll be at your house and I’m going to have you try something.”

Bob Reitz
I put him on NuCalm, which is really cool. I watched him … I sat down in the basement with him and I could feel the tension in their house. It’s incredible. We decided as a team, we weren’t going to say a word about another modality that they were going to try that was going to all of a sudden fix his PTSD and his issues because he had tried every one.

Bob Reitz
For him, he wouldn’t even do longer than 20 minutes. He felt like he was doing something wrong. I put him on for the 20 minute power nap and I watched him settle into the couch and calm down. It was interesting because from that moment forward, we went outside and his spouse, his wife had left. There was another Seal in the house so there was something, obviously, bad happening.

Bob Reitz
We went outside and the neighbor was shoveling rocks. Just an awesome sound of someone diving in with a metal shovel into rocks. He looked at me and he said, “It’s interesting. I don’t understand what’s happening right now but normally that would make me want to either go across the street and do something bad or go inside and just get away from it.” He said, “It’s really not that bad.”

Bob Reitz
I had him describe it and he said, “It’s just not as intense.” That’s what we talk about with him is the level of intensity that he feels that things that normally irritate him and cause him to explode and make his family want to run away.

Bob Reitz
It’s funny. You just reach out to different guys or they find you and you introduce them, gently, to the product. You say, “Hey, listen. This is an option. Give it a go.” For him, in particular, he’s been NuCalming every day since and things are getting very good for him, they’re getting much better. He doesn’t understand the science. We’ve tried to explain it to him. It doesn’t really matter for him. He’s just happy that it’s working.

Bob Reitz
It’s through conversation. I had a conversation with another customer today. I think I mentioned him earlier. He’s the one that has a long history of family in the military. All he wants to do is take care of vets. We talked about it today and I said, “Hey, listen, what I need from you is I need their name, I need their service, when they were in, what they did” and so we have a simple vetting process and I’m fighting hard to work with 501s and get those systems funded so those vets get those systems.

Bob Reitz
He talked about a friend of his who was in dire straits. I said, “Get his information and send it to me and we’ll get him sorted out. We’ll get him on. No matter what, we’ll get him on and then we’ll sort out the rest later.” That’s how we do it.

Bob Reitz
I work with Dave and Dave’s very supportive. I come to him with people and I say, “I have a hard case and I need help.” He says, “No problem. Let’s get them going and then we’ll sort out the rest later.” That’s how we take care of them. The more word we get out, the better.

David Poole
I say yes to everything, Bob, because I’m scared to death of you.

Bob Reitz
I’m going to come visit you.

David Poole
Don’t.

Erica
Thank you very much, Bob. I just wanted to say thanks for sharing your story. It’s something I’ve never heard. I’ve worked with you a lot over the last year but usually it’s always work stuff and we don’t really dive into the personal too much. Thank you very much on behalf of everyone for joining us tonight.

Erica
To follow-up on the last question you had, there was a question from Bridget and I’ll read it out loud but it goes along about how do you customize NuCalm for these vets that you’re working with. She says, “I have a few friends who are former Seals and they are notorious for not only being extremely picky about the products and tools they surround themselves with because they have to rely on them in life and death situations but they also find ways to customize or improve on these products to fit their needs. I am curious to know if you have come up with ways to customize NuCalm to reach maximum performance?”

Bob Reitz
Yeah. That’s a good question. Dave and I talk a lot about this as we try to get this out to our boys. It’s one thing … We’re talking veterans, we’re talking folks that come home from the military and try to assimilate back into society, their families, and to their normal life, which is difficult as it is.

Bob Reitz
For our guys … Take, for instance, being in Afghanistan. We don’t work normal hours, obviously. We go visit people in the middle of the night. We wake them up. That’s the idea. We go on a completely different schedule. We go on a night time schedule. We wake up, eat breakfast at five o’clock in the evening and we eat dinner after we’re all done for breakfast. That really throws you off, working … Anybody who works nights understands that.

Bob Reitz
What I would argue is for the guys that are going overseas, that are deploying, the Seals that are actually doing work today, I wish I had NuCalm when I was working those types of hours, when I was working the moonlight … We’re usually off during the moon time, we’re usually on when it’s dark and so it would be really nice … You go 14, 15 straight days of missions and working at night.

Bob Reitz
To have NuCalm at the side and to have this product that not only restores you but it creates … You become more awake. Anybody who’s done NuCalm understands you’re more alert, you feel better, you get restored. For those guys, I would argue, when you come home at night to unwind, if you had a really rough night, you can wind down with NuCalm. It’ll take all that adrenaline and it’ll shut it down. Then when you wake up in the morning, you do a quick session, and get focused for the day because you’re trying to wake up as the night begins.

Bob Reitz
It helps you with those rhythms that you’re actually doing the exact opposite of what you’re designed to do. I think that’s where NuCalm really shines. They have to try it. They have to do it. They’ve got to see it to believe it. That’s the idea.

Erica
Yeah. I guess I can ask this to David and Bob but if there are people on this call who do have friends who are vets or they themselves, they can always reach out? Is that okay to say?

Bob Reitz
Of course.

Erica
That helps Bridget.

Bob Reitz
Without question. Sometimes vets don’t want to hear it from anybody. They don’t want to hear it from people that they look at and say, “You don’t get it.” But sometimes they will talk to somebody who has been there and does get it. I don’t care if it’s three in the morning on Sunday night, if somebody needs to call me because they’re hurting, they can. I’ve always said that and I mean it.

Bob Reitz
Especially if it’s somebody who’s hurting and in a dysfunctional place, and I am sure … I know Dave would do the same thing. Any of us would. We’re always available, especially if people are hurting.

Erica
Thank you so much, Bob. I see Sarah has a question that she posted in the chat. Sarah, you can just come off mute and ask Bob your question.

Sarah
Can you hear me?

Bob Reitz
Yes.

Sarah
Okay. Hi, Bob. I’m sorry. I jumped in late. I had another Zoom right before this. I have a TBI from when I was in the Air Force. It is affected a lot … It affects my sleep and things. I’m not combat but I had some other instances happen in the military. I also have TMJ really bad and my doctors and everything think they’re connected. I don’t sleep and I grind like heck. I’m having all sorts of dental problems now because of this.

Sarah
I was wondering if NuCalm works like that because I am trying to get one but I’m trying to go through … The VA needs to research if they’re going to get it. It’s just right now I’m not at a place where I can get one. I know there’s people that are way more [inaudible 010628] than I am and I want them … If they benefit more, then I want them to get it but if there’s a way I can help somebody else too, I want to do that.

Bob Reitz
Let’s start at ground zero first, right? Anybody will tell you, just in any family situation, you will help a lot more people, the sooner you get to a place where you have the bandwidth to help other people. That’s where we’re going to get you first is you’re going to get your bandwidth up to a point and get you to a place where you feel normal again.

Bob Reitz
I grind my teeth. They’re shredded, my teeth. It’s one of my biggest issues. It’s difficult to manage. There’s a lot to it but at the end of the day, you need a mouth guard that helps you from shredding your teeth to pieces. That’s where my stress goes too. It goes to the same place. I grind my teeth every single day and I have to stop myself.

Bob Reitz
TBI-wise, I’m going to leave that to Dave because he has way more experience with that than I do. All I can tell you is is that I’m diagnosed … We have it … Obviously, we have lots of breaching issues that we deal with on Seal Teams. We shoot rockets that are very big and very loud and very concussive. We shoot a lot of them all the time in the Teams. Often times, we shoot them for fun just to get rid of the ordinance because we have to.

Bob Reitz
The TBI is a significant issue. As you know, the VA looks at TBI not as TBI but it looks at your symptoms of TBI. The VA will not at this point … As you said, they’re going to do some research and that’s going to be slow. That’s not the right path that we want to go with you. What we want to do is connect with me and then we can talk about and we’ll sort out how to get you going to try it and see if you find some relief. That’s really at the end of the day how we would do it. That’s how I do it with everybody.

Bob Reitz
If it’s expensive then at this very moment I am working with … I’m figuring out my path and how to work with the 501s and all of the charities, lack of better term. There’s lot of different 501 charities that are out there that are helping veterans. There’s a ton. We are sorting that out as we speak.

Bob Reitz
You’re not alone. They key is don’t sit back and wait. Reach out. I don’t know. I think Erica … I don’t know if my information is there or Dave’s information. Connect with Erica, Erica will connect you, someone in NuCalm will connect you and get you going. That’s the key. Give it a go. I’m confident it will help you but let’s give it a go.

David Poole
[crosstalk 010938].

Sarah
Sorry. Go ahead.

David Poole
It’s a Christmas miracle that you joined the call because I’m looking at Cheryl Larson, who can treat TBI, I’m looking at Erica Robinson, whose dad is a dentist and treats TMJ, no shit, and Che, who builds planes so he can relate to your Air Force experience. Please, reach out to us and we’ll take care of you. I promise.

Sarah
Thank you. If I can help, I’ve got a background in social work and mental health and I’ve done a lot with grant writing. I’ve gotten a few grants approved at the farm I volunteer at. If I can help with grant writing, I’ll happily put my pen to paper.

David Poole
No worries. Like Bob said, we’ll get you in a place where you’ve got bandwidth and then we’ll put you to work for the rest of your life. [crosstalk 011034].

Bob Reitz
That’s how Dave does it.

Sarah
I’m all about giving back. My goal is to open a farm that helps veterans with using rescued horses. That’s why I want to get myself a better bandwidth too.

David Poole
Excellent.

Sarah
Thank you.

Bob Reitz
You bet.

Erica
Thank you, Sarah. Brendan, I see that you’ve also asked to speak so please come off mute and fire away.

Brendan
Thanks, guys. Yeah. I was just wondering. This is not really so much NuCalm-specific but I was wondering, Bob, if there was anything you recommend, like I’m an athlete, for you guys, obviously, getting in the zone and staying in that in combat … Like, for us, if we have a bad play or miss a pass or something like that, we get another chance at it. Obviously, for you guys, it could be way worse consequences. I wondered if there was something that you do, whether it was breath work or something like that that could keep you in that mindset when you were in combat?

Bob Reitz
I’d argue don’t fall in love with a mistake. At the end of the day, we’re not finished until we’re finished. Everybody makes mistakes. We always say to … One of our sayings is that the mission planning is simply point of departure. Nothing in a mission plan goes as ordered. Nothing in a mission plan goes as you would want it to. It literally is a point of departure and so it’s the … What sport do you do?

Brendan
Hockey.

Bob Reitz
Okay. You guys practice incessantly. Dave is a huge hockey player. You’re speaking his language. What I would tell you is is that for us, even if … We always say in the Seal Teams, a bad plan followed and done well is better than a good plan that doesn’t get followed and done well. You know what I’m saying?

Bob Reitz
The point being is if you make a mistake and we all adjust to it, we’re going to adjust to it quickly and we’re going to as a group, adjust to that problem and literally flow through it. Nothing in warfare is planned. It can’t be because you’re dealing with at least one other person that gets a vote. It’s usually more people than that that get a vote and can change the flow of what you thought was going to happen.

Bob Reitz
We don’t get married to any plan per se. We have a direction. We know what we need to do as an end result. We’re not married by any stretch of the imagination to following that to the T. What you might consider a mistake is just a flow problem and the guys accept it, they flow right through it, and they move past it and go on with the objective, with the final objective at hand, which is to win. That’s all we care about is winning. That they pay, not us.

Bob Reitz
In sports, the same rules. You have a problem. If you make a mistake, if you lose the puck, if somebody scores on you, then you adjust, you all get together, and you move through it and you pass it. You get to a point to where you’re succeeding again.

Brendan
Awesome. Thank you.

David Poole
Brendan, we don’t have a lot of time tonight but Bob and I speak all the time and what he’s not telling you is the Bud’s training, the training he does and the deployments he does, he’s been conditioned to live well outside of his comfort zone. He said today, “Hey, Dave, when they said I was going to be running for 20 hours” I was like, “Uh, no. I’m not. Never done that. Maybe you could run a marathon for four hours. I’m not running for 20 hours.” Sure as shit, I ran for 20 hours and so did everybody else who never thought they could.

David Poole
His point, when we talk about this and the conditioning and training, like you said, “Hey, if I can hold my breath for three minutes, they care what I do at 301 and 330 and four minutes.” For you, you’ve got natural talent … We work with a lot of hockey players and it’s not because I love the sport. It’s because they were smart enough to take on NuCalm seven, eight years ago.

David Poole
Trust your instincts, trust your mechanics but you need to have that mindset of quickly forget the mistakes and don’t let that [inaudible 011537] itty bitty shitty committee get inside your head and ratchet it up and go back … That’s what happens in baseball too. I work with a lot of athletes and a lot of baseball players. They’ll go through a rough time at the plate and they’ll call me. I’m like, “Why are you calling me, dude? I’m not your sports psychologist. I’m not your hitting coach.” He’s like, “Yeah, but you’re not judging me.” I’m like, “I’m not judging. What I do know is that you were born to hit baseballs. Better than anybody else on the planet. Shut up, stop complaining, get out there and hit baseballs. It’s that simple.”

David Poole
Same thing for you. Get in there and do the exact same thing you’ve been trained to do and don’t let it get personal and don’t take the blame for something … That doesn’t mean don’t take responsibility. Don’t take the blame for stuff and just move forward.

David Poole
Bob does that every day in every situation. I’ve known he’s had PTSD since I met him. He didn’t admit it. He didn’t know it. But he’s got moves. He cycles through them. We know as a team and as a family that supports Bob and loves him to death, and he can’t do any wrong to us, we just listen. I don’t fight with Bob. He’s in a mood, I listen and say, “Okay, I get it.” Then lo and behold, I don’t know if he sits down and gets better but now I know the trick.

David Poole
Same thing for you. We can take this offline too, bro. I’m happy to connect you with some of the pro players we work with if you want to talk to your peers.

Bob Reitz
Yeah. Brendan, don’t be afraid of failure, right? At the end of the day. One thing that we learned and Dave reminded me, it’s funny because it’s not something that … It isn’t a joke. If you run a four minute mile, nobody cares. The instructors will look at you and say, “Hey, that was great. You better beat it tomorrow.” Right?

Bob Reitz
If you can hold your breath … Some of our guys can really hold their breath long. They don’t care. They’ll wait on the surface for three minutes and then go down. They don’t care if you can do 500 pushups. They want to see what you can do at 501 and 502 and what your attitude is there. That’s why a lot of the big strong guys quit is because they’ve never seen … Because they could always do those pushups and always hold their breath longest, they’ve never been exposed to failure.

Bob Reitz
One thing that our training really introduces you to on a daily basis is not good enough, you’re always failing, you’re never good enough. That’s the strength of our unit is we’re used to failing for each other and as a group and rebounding from that. That’s the key is to rebound and to move forward even though you just got your shit handed to you by an instructor who is not impressed that you ran a 330 mile. He wants to see what you do the next day and the next day and the next day after that.

Bob Reitz
I would tell you so what? Who cares if you made a mistake? Circle back, find it, fix it, forget it, and don’t make a mistake again.

Brendan
Awesome. Thanks, guys. Appreciate that.

Erica
Well, from what I can see in our [crosstalk 011913].

David Poole
Erica, do you have Ken Miller? Speak to Sarah’s … He had a good comment about her grinding. This could help out too.

Erica
Ken says, “People who grind their teeth a lot at night should be tested for obstructive sleep apnea because [inaudible 011928] can be a sign of not getting enough air at night. I may be way off here but it’s something that should be considered.” I would probably, as the daughter of a dentist who does this, I would also second what Ken has just said.

Bob Reitz
[crosstalk 011945].

David Poole
He knows. Yes.

Bob Reitz
I have central sleep apnea.

Erica
Yeah. Sleep apnea is very common. For those in the Mastermind program, you can definitely go back and watch that recording with Dr. Robinson where he does talk about breathing and sleep and stress and your jaw and your bite and how it’s all interconnected.

Erica
I don’t see any other questions here but I just wanted to echo some of the comments that were said on behalf of some of the participants, Bob, from Casey saying, “Bobby, so glad that you found NuCalm, brother. Thanks for your service and thank you for being you, pal.”

Bob Reitz
That’s my guy.

Erica
[crosstalk 012029], which I might butcher, uva uvam vivendo varia fit, which maybe you know it more than I do. I don’t speak [inaudible 012038].

Bob Reitz
Latin.

Erica
Mark, who had to drop off but he says, “Bob, thank you for being on this call today and sharing your story. I resonate with you on several issues, being a retired combat arms Marine. I have to leave the call for another one soon but thanks again and Semper fidelis, brother.”

Bob Reitz
Semper fi. That’s Marine brothers.

Erica
Che says, “Bob, do you always speak this calmly? Especially after you just discharged from [inaudible 012108] is the effect of NuCalm on you.”

Bob Reitz
No. I had a whole glass of vodka. It’s water. Che, you know I’m here for you, buddy. All hours of the night, my Singaporean brother.

Erica
All right. David, do you want to say any final words?

David Poole
Oh, great. Yeah. Let’s wrap it up. Thanks, Bob. Appreciate it. You know how much we love you and appreciate your service. I’m really glad you were willing to share.